Cases reported "Tachycardia, Ventricular"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

21/108. Efficacy of long duration resuscitation and magnesium sulphate treatment in amitriptyline poisoning.

    A single dose of cyclic antidepressants leads to death in childhood. Myocardial depression and ventricular arrhythmia are the severe side effects in cyclic antidepressant overdose. A 23-month-old boy was brought to hospital because 36 mg/kg of amitriptyline had been taken. cardiopulmonary resuscitation was applied for 70 minutes due to cardiac and respiratory arrest. Circulation was restored after resuscitative efforts. However, ventricular tachycardia was detected which did not respond to lidocaine, bicarbonate and cardioversion treatment. magnesium sulphate treatment was started and cardiac rhythm normalized. No side effects were observed. The duration of resuscitation should be extended in cases of cardiopulmonary arrest secondary to tricyclic antidepressants intoxication. It should be continued at least for 1 hour. magnesium sulphate was found to be extremely effective in a case of amitriptyline intoxication refractory to treatment.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = death
(Clic here for more details about this article)

22/108. Radiofrequency ablation of sustained ventricular tachycardia related to the mitral isthmus in Chagas' disease.

    This case report describes the electrophysiological findings of a 62-year-old patient with chronic Chagas' disease and two distinct morphologies of sustained ventricular tachycardia that involved a mitral isthmus. Multiple RF applications were necessary to obtain a bidirectional conduction block in the mitral isthmus that was related to the interruption of both tachycardias. After the procedure, the patient presented massive cerebral infarction that progressed to coma and death. autopsy showed acute and old lesions at the mitral isthmus and recent mitral annulus thrombosis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = death
(Clic here for more details about this article)

23/108. Ventricular assist device support for management of sustained ventricular arrhythmias.

    We describe herein the cases of 2 patients who had ventricular arrhythmias. In one, a short-term biventricular assist device, the ABIOMED BVS 5000, was placed because the patient had sustained ventricular tachycardia and could not be weaned from cardiopulmonary bypass. Excellent hemodynamic support was maintained for several days while the antiarrhythmic therapy was maximized. Sinus rhythm was restored, and the patient was successfully weaned from the ventricular assist device. However, the substrate for the arrhythmia persisted, and a recurrence, 1 week later, resulted in the patient's death. In the 2nd patient, the use of an implantable left ventricular assist device was successful in temporarily alleviating the ventricular tachycardia associated with ischemic cardiomyopathy. However, after 2 days of device assistance, the patient experienced a recurrence of the tachycardia, which degenerated into ventricular fibrillation with a marked deterioration in the patient's hemodynamics. The arrhythmia persisted despite multiple attempts at external cardioversion, and internal cardioversion and placement of an automatic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator were necessary. This treatment, along with repeated boluses of amiodarone, led to successful suppression of the arrhythmias, and the patient eventually underwent transplantation. The mechanical hemodynamic support of the circulation by ventricular assist devices was effective in supporting these 2 patients who had sustained ventricular arrhythmias.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = death
(Clic here for more details about this article)

24/108. Sexual activity as a trigger for ventricular tachycardia in a patient with implantable cardioverter defibrillator.

    Occurrence of life threatening arrhythmias and sudden death during or following sexual activity is infrequent. We describe a patient with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator who developed increased ventricular ectopic activity followed by sustained ventricular tachycardia during extramarital coitus. A review of literature and management is discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = death
(Clic here for more details about this article)

25/108. Ventricular tachycardia in congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    Severe hyperkalaemia in patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia in association with aggravating factors such as acidosis and hypocalcaemia can cause life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. Treatment of the underlying cause may be the only modality required in such cases. We report a 20-day-old male presenting with ventricular tachycardia due to electrolyte abnormalities in salt-losing congenital adrenal hyperplasia. Sudden cardiac deaths reported earlier in such cases thus gain credence.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = death
(Clic here for more details about this article)

26/108. brugada syndrome: an unusual cause of convulsive syncope.

    A patient who presented with a new apparent seizure was found to have abnormal electrocardiographic findings, with classic features of the brugada syndrome. He had spontaneous episodes of nonsustained ventricular tachycardia, easily inducible ventricular fibrillation at electrophysiological study in the absence of structural heart disease, and a negative neurological evaluation. These findings suggested that sustained ventricular arrhythmias known to be associated with the brugada syndrome and resultant cerebral hypoperfusion, rather than a primary seizure disorder, were responsible for the event. patients with the brugada syndrome often present with sudden death or with syncope resulting from ventricular arrhythmias. In consideration of its variability in presentation sometimes mimicking other disorders, primary care physicians and internists should be aware of its often transient electrocardiographic features.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = death
(Clic here for more details about this article)

27/108. A case of secondary myocardial lymphoma presenting with ventricular tachycardia.

    Malignant lymphoma can involve the cardiac cavity or myocardium as a mass. Clinical symptoms of its cardiac involvement are usually absent or nonspecific, making the diagnosis of the cardiac involvement very difficult before death. We experienced a patient with secondary myocardial non-Hodgkin's lymphoma presenting with sustained ventricular tachycardia (VT) as a primary clinical problem. A 39-yr-old woman visited our hospital because of dyspnea and palpitation for 7 days. physical examination revealed rapid heart beat with variable intensity of the first heart sound and soft mass in the lower abdomen. VT with a cycle length of 480 msec was recorded in resting 12-lead electrocardiogram. Two well-circumscribed hypo-echogenic round masses were demonstrated in the interventricular septum and left ventricular posterior wall. Cytological examination of aspirated pericardial fluid and percutaneous needle biopsy of the abdominal mass revealed a diffuse large cell type non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Myocardial masses and ventricular tachycardia resolved with chemotherapy using cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, vincristine and prednisone regimen. To our best knowledge, the same case as ours has not been reported previously.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = death
(Clic here for more details about this article)

28/108. exercise-induced bidirectional ventricular tachycardia with alternating right and left bundle branch block-type patterns--a case report.

    exercise-induced ventricular tachycardia in young adults may occur with various structural heart diseases or with structurally normal heart. The structural heart diseases reported to cause exercise-induced ventricular tachycardia in this patient population include arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, myocarditis, congenital heart disease, and myocardial ischemia. The conditions well identified to cause exercise-induced ventricular tachycardia with structurally normal heart are congenital long-QT syndrome and familial polymorphic ventricular tachycardia. exercise-induced ventricular tachycardia may display polymorphic, monomorphic, or bidirectional morphologies. A case of exercise-induced catecholamine-sensitive bidirectional ventricular tachycardia with alternating right and left bundle branch block patterns is reported in a young boy in the absence of structural heart disease, the conditions causing bidirectional ventricular tachycardia, and family history of such an event or sudden cardiac death. The bidirectional tachycardia typically displays right bundle branch block in right precordial leads with alternating polarity of the QRS-complex in frontal plane leads but in this case the bidirectional morphology of tachycardia was caused by alternating right and left bundle branch block-type patterns. The conditions causing bidirectional ventricular tachycardia are digoxin toxicity, ischemic heart disease, hypokalemia, myocarditis, and familial polymorphic ventricular tachycardia syndrome but the exact cause in this patient remained obscure, and the possibility of an underlying electrical or ion channel disease of the heart could not be ruled out.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = death
(Clic here for more details about this article)

29/108. Sudden death caused by cardiac sarcoidosis in childhood.

    This report describes an adolescent who presented with ventricular tachycardia (VT) originating from the right ventricular apex, with no apparent underlying cause. Cardiac sarcoidosis was identified only at postmortem examination after sudden death. There must be a high index of suspicion for subtle forms of primary myocardial abnormalities in such cases. Investigation for VT should include specific investigations for cardiac sarcoidosis when no other pathology has been identified and there are persistent conduction abnormalities on resting ECG.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = death
(Clic here for more details about this article)

30/108. brugada syndrome with ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation related to hypokalemia.

    A 60-year-old man with asymptomatic brugada syndrome and neither a history of syncope nor family history of sudden death was admitted because of bronchial asthma. serum potassium concentration was 3.8 mmol/L on admission, and decreased to 3.1 mmol/L on the 6th day, probably as a side effect of steroid therapy. The patient was found unconscious on the 7th day, and his serum potassium concentration was 3.4 mmol/L immediately after the episode. On the 8th day, the patient was again found unconscious, and polymorphic ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation (VT/VF) was documented on electrocardiographic (ECG) monitoring. The coved type of ST-segment elevation in leads V(1-3) was observed on the ECG after spontaneous recovery of sinus rhythm, and VT/VF associated with brugada syndrome was diagnosed. The serum potassium concentration decreased to 2.9 mmol/L immediately after the episode, but QT prolongation was not observed during the clinical course. After the correcting the serum potassium concentration, there was no further recurrence of the malignant ventricular arrhythmia and syncope. An implantable cardioverter defibrillator was inserted to prevent sudden death. hypokalemia that does not induce QT prolongation may contribute to the occurrence of VT/VF in brugada syndrome.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = death
(Clic here for more details about this article)
<- Previous || Next ->


Leave a message about 'Tachycardia, Ventricular'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.