Cases reported "Tachycardia, Ventricular"

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1/115. safety of antiarrhythmics during pregnancy: case report and review of the literature.

    A young woman is reported with intractable sustained ventricular tachycardia thought to originate in the right ventricle, which was treated successfully with encainide after failure to respond to beta-blockers and several class IA antiarrhythmic agents. She became pregnant twice while on encainide and gave birth to two healthy children. This is the first report of pregnancy during treatment with encainide. A literature review showed no other reported case of encainide taken during pregnancy, but several reports of the safe use of flecainide, a similar class IC drug, during pregnancy. Other antiarrhythmics are also reviewed.
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2/115. Radiofrequency catheter ablation as primary therapy for symptomatic ventricular tachycardia.

    Most applications of radiofrequency (RF) catheter ablation for treatment of ventricular tachycardia (VT) have been as a treatment of last resort. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy and safety of RF catheter ablation as the primary treatment for symptomatic single morphology VT. Eleven of 81 patients (14%) with inducible sustained monomorphic VT underwent RF ablation as the primary treatment. One of these 11 patients had successful RF ablation of bundle branch reentry VT and was excluded from this series. The remaining 10 patients had a mean age of 58 /- 19 years (range 20 to 73 years), were mostly men (7 of 10 patients), and all presented with documented evidence of symptomatic sustained monomorphic VT, at a mean cycle length of 340 /- 60 milliseconds (ms) (range 250 to 430 ms). Six patients had coronary artery disease (CAD), one had surgical repair for tetralogy of fallot, one had surgical repair of a ventricular septal defect, and two had a normal cardiac substrate. The VT origin was mapped using a combination of activation mapping, mid-diastolic potentials, pace mapping, and concealed entrainment. A mean of 5 /- 3 (range 2 to 11) RF applications were administered to the putative VT foci. Eight of 10 (80%) clinical VTs were successfully ablated. There were no serious complications. patients with VT originating from the left ventricle were offered implantable cardioverter-defibrillator back-up; however, only one patient accepted this option. At a mean follow-up of 12 /- 7 months, only one patient had a possible arrhythmia recurrence.
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3/115. Radiofrequency catheter ablation of coexistent atrioventricular reciprocating tachycardia and left ventricular tachycardia originating in the left anterior fascicle.

    Coexistence of supraventricular tachycardia and ventricular tachycardia is rare. A patient with no structural heart disease and wide QRS complex tachycardia with a right bundle block configuration and right-axis deviation underwent electrophysiological examination. A concealed left atrioventricular pathway (AP) was found, and atrioventricular reciprocating tachycardia (AVRT) and left ventricular tachycardia (VT) originating in or close to the anterior fascicle of the left ventricle were both induced. Radiofrequency (RF) catheter ablation of the concealed left AP was successfully performed. Ten months later, VT recurred and was successfully ablated using a local Purkinje potential as a guide. Coexistent AVRT and idiopathic VT originating from within or near the left anterior fascicle were successfully ablated.
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4/115. Transient complete atrioventricular block provoked by ventricular pacing in a patient with nonsustained ventricular tachycardia.

    A 75-year-old woman with complete left bundle branch block underwent electrophysiological study (EPS) to assess the conduction in the His-Purkinje conduction system and to further investigate the electrical instability in the ventricle, which was suggestive by the findings of nonsustained ventricular tachycardia in ambulatory monitoring. Transient complete atrioventricular (AV) block was provoked by ventricular pacing, and the intracardiac recordings proved that the site of AV block was distal to the His bundle. This phenomenon was not related to the rate or the duration of the ventricular pacing. The transient impairment of the conduction appeared to be due to the fatigue phenomenon in the His-Purkinje system.
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5/115. Idiopathic verapamil-sensitive left ventricular tachycardia complicated by right ventricular outflow tract ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation.

    Idiopathic ventricular tachycardias (VTs) are generally divided into those arising from the right ventricle and those arising from the left ventricle. There has been few reports of two morphologically distinct VT occurring in patients with no apparent structural heart disease. We report a patient with verapamil-sensitive left VT with a right bundle branch block pattern that spontaneously changed to VT with a left bundle branch block pattern. Ventricular fibrillation was induced by the application of programmed stimulation. Although it is unclear if our patient with pleomorphic VT has ventricular vulnerability, it is necessary to investigate further and follow him carefully.
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6/115. A young man with recurrent syncopes, right bundle branch block and ST segment elevation.

    We report on the case of a 33-year-old man with recurrent syncopes appearing suddenly due to sustained monomorphic ventricular tachycardias. The electrocardiogram (ECG) showed a right bundle branch block pattern and ST segment elevation in the precordial leads V1 to V2, not explained by ischemia, electrolyte disturbances, toxic ingestion, or structural heart disease (coronary and right ventricle angiograms as well as biopsies of the right ventricle were normal). ECG image was compatible with the so-called brugada syndrome, first described in 1992. This entity is very rare. Missed diagnosis can be disastrous because life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias often develop in patients.
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7/115. tachycardia-dependent right bundle-branch block with supernormal conduction.

    This paper reports the case of a 76-year-old man in whom atrial flutter with varying atrioventricular block and intermittent right bundle-branch block was found. This is the first report on tachycardia-dependent right bundle-branch block associated with supernormal conduction in a case of atrial flutter. When an impulse is conducted to the ventricles beyond 0.72 s after a QRS complex of right bundle-branch block configuration, the impulse falls after the abnormally long effective refractor period of the right bundle branch and passes through the right bundle branch. When the conducted impulse occurs within 0.72 s after a QRS complex of right bundle-branch block configuration, the impulse usually falls in the refractory period and is blocked in the right bundle branch; however, only when the impulse occurs 0.48 or 0.49 s after that does it fall in the supernormal period and passes through the right bundle branch. The findings in the present report strengthen our previous suggestion that the presence of supernormal conduction plays an important role in the initiation of reentrant ventricular tachycardia.
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8/115. Ventricular tachycardia as a complication of atrial flutter ablation.

    A 61-year-old woman with dilated cardiomyopathy, who previously underwent successful radiofrequency catheter ablation for atrial flutter, developed monomorphic ventricular tachycardia (VT). The site of VT origin was the inferobasal right ventricle adjacent to the previous atrial isthmus ablation area. The most likely mechanism for the VT was scar-related reentry, the scar being the result of previous radiofrequency lesions in the atrial isthmus. The VT was successfully ablated.
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9/115. Radiofrequency catheter ablation of ventricular tachycardia from the anterobasal left ventricle.

    Ventricular tachycardia (VT) in coronary artery disease arises mostly from endocardial sites. However, little is known about the site of origin in other diseases. We report two patients who had VT originating from an anterior aspect of the left ventricle just below the mitral annulus, adjacent to the left ventricular outflow tract. The QRS configuration of VT showed an inferior axis and monophasic R waves in all the precordial leads. Radiofrequency current delivered to this site from the endocardial site successfully ablated the tachycardia in both.
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10/115. Successful radiofrequency catheter ablation of incessant ventricular tachycardia with a delta wave-like beginning of the QRS complex.

    Ventricular tachycardia with a delta wave-like beginning of the QRS complex is considered to be refractory to endocardial catheter ablation because it originates from the epicardial region. A 45-year-old woman had incessant ventricular tachycardia with a delta wave-like beginning of the QRS complex which was resistant to several antiarrhythmic drugs. The origin of the arrhythmia was at the mitral annulus on the antero-lateral left ventricular wall. The earliest endocardial activation preceded the QRS complex by 18 msec. After 7 sec of endocardial radiofrequency application ventricular tachycardia was terminated. During a 2 year follow-up ventricular tachycardia did not recur and only small numbers of premature ventricular contractions (< 100/day) were noted. VT with delta wave-like QRS morphology which originates from the basal region of the ventricle may be treated successfully with radiofrequency catheter ablation using an endocardial approach.
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