Cases reported "Tachycardia"

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1/296. Failure of right atrial premature beats to reset atriofascicular tachycardia.

    A patient with a right atriofascicular (Mahaim) tachycardia was found to have inducible antidromic supraventricular tachycardia, but atrial premature beats from the right atrial free wall failed to reset the tachycardia. An interesting transition from AV nodal reentry tachycardia to Mahaim tachycardia is also presented.
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ranking = 1
keywords = supraventricular
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2/296. Wide QRS complex tachycardia: ECG differential diagnosis.

    Wide QRS complex tachycardias (WCT) present significant diagnostic and therapeutic challenges to the emergency physician. WCT may represent a supraventricular tachycardia with aberrant ventricular conduction; alternatively, such a rhythm presentation may be caused by ventricular tachycardia. Other clinical syndromes may also demonstrate WCT, such as tricyclic antidepressant toxicity and hyperkalemia. Patient age and history may assist in rhythm diagnosis, especially when coupled with electrocardiographic (ECG) evidence. Numerous ECG features have been suggested as potential clues to origin of the WCT, including ventricular rate, frontal axis, QRS complex width, and QRS morphology, as well as the presence of other characteristics such as atrioventricular dissociation and fusion/capture beats. Differentiation between ventricular tachycardia and supraventricular tachycardia with aberrant conduction frequently is difficult despite this clinical and electrocardiographic information, particularly in the early stages of evaluation with an unstable patient. When the rhythm diagnosis is in question, resuscitative therapy should be directed toward ventricular tachycardia.
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ranking = 2.0012739229096
keywords = supraventricular, complex
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3/296. Treatment of the bradycardia-tachycardia syndrome with permanent demand pacing.

    The bradycardia-tachycardia syndrome (paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia alternating with sinus bradycardia and episodes of sinus node arrest) has previously presented a complicated therapeutic dilemma when excitatory and suppressive drugs have been utilized. A patient with this syndrome successfully treated with a permanent ventricular transvenous demand pacemaker is presented. Various aspects of this syndrome as well as facets of diagnosis and treatment have been reviewed and discussed. Significant underlying cardiac disease was ruled out in this patient by the usual diagnostic methods including left heart catheterization and coronary angiography. An interesting possibility of the relationship of vagal stimulation secondary to hiatus hernia as an etiologic factor in this syndrome has been discussed. The opinion is expressed that the currently preferred method of treatment is the insertion of a permanent transvenous pacemaker alone or in conjunction with antiarrhythmic drugs, preferably digitalis and propranolol.
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ranking = 1
keywords = supraventricular
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4/296. electrocardiography in the patient with the wolff-parkinson-white syndrome: diagnostic and initial therapeutic issues.

    The wolff-parkinson-white syndrome (WPW), estimated to occur in approximately 0.1% to 3% of the general population, is a form of ventricular preexcitation involving an accessory conduction pathway. The definition of WPW relies on the following electrocardiographic features: (1) a PR interval less than 0.12 seconds (2) with a slurring of the initial segment of the QRS complex, known as a delta wave, (3) a QRS complex widening with a total duration greater than 0.12 seconds, and (4) secondary repolarization changes reflected in ST segment-T wave changes that are generally directed opposite (discordant) to the major delta wave and QRS complex changes. The accessory pathway bypasses the atrioventricular (AV) node, creating a direct electrical connection between the atria and ventricles. The majority of patients with preexcitation syndromes remain asymptomatic throughout their lives. When symptoms do occur they are usually secondary to tachyarrhythmias; the importance of recognizing this syndrome is that these patients may be at risk to develop a variety of supraventricular tachyarrhythmias which cause disabling symptoms and, in the extreme, sudden cardiac death. The tachyarrhythmias encountered in the WPW patient include paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (both the narrow QRS and wide QRS complex varieties), atrial fibrillation, atrial flutter, and ventricular fibrillation. Diagnostic and urgent, initial therapeutic issues based on initial electrocardiographic information are presented via 5 illustrative cases.
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ranking = 2.0008492819397
keywords = supraventricular, complex
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5/296. Fetal hydrops due to a tachyarrhythmia progressing to organic pulmonary stenosis.

    We discovered supraventricular tachycardia with advanced hydrops in the setting of normal cardiac anatomy at 26 weeks of gestation which resolved successfully following administration of digoxin and flecainide to the mother. A female baby was born after a premature rupture of the membranes at 30.6 weeks. The neonate was in sinus rhythm, showed a progressive regression of right ventricular insufficiency, but developed signs of acquired pulmonary valvar and subvalvar stenosis at 2 months of age.
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ranking = 1
keywords = supraventricular
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6/296. The diagnosis or ventricular tachycardia with ventriculo-atrial conduction.

    A 57 year old man developed recurrent tachycardia with QRS complexes of 0.13 second in duration at a rate of 140 beats per minute. Inverted P waves appeared to follow each QRS complex in the electrocardiographic leads II, III and aVF. The differentiation between ventricular tachycardia with1 : 1 V-A conduction and supraventricular tachycardia with aberrant ventricular conduction was difficult to make from the surface electrocardiogram. This differentiation is important for selection of appropriate therapy. The diagnosis of ventricular tachycardia with 1 : 1 V-A conduction was clearly established in this case on simultaneous recording of surface electrocardiogram, His bundle electrogram and high right atrial electrogram.
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ranking = 1.0004246409699
keywords = supraventricular, complex
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7/296. Bidirectional tachycardia a study of five cases.

    Five patients with bidirectional tachycardia due to digitalis toxicity associated with severe organic heart disease were studied. The origin of the abnormal rhythm was established with the aid of His bundle recordings in three cases and by indirect clues in the others two. In three cases the origin of bidirectional tachycardia was suprahisian while in two patients it was infrahisian. In one patient the transition from junctional to ventricular tachycardia could be observed. Bidirectional tachycardia appears to be a complex arrhythmia in which similar electrocardiographic configuration can be due to different mechanism. digitalis toxicity was often a causal factor.
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ranking = 0.0002123204849292
keywords = complex
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8/296. tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy secondary to thyrotoxicosis: a young man with previously unrecognized Graves' disease.

    A young man with previously unrecognized Graves' disease presented with atrial fibrillation and severe low-output heart failure due to dilated cardiomyopathy. The patient's cardiomyopathy resolved and cardiac function recovered shortly after hyperthyroidism and tachycardia were treated during hospitalization. The temporal relationship between heart rate and cardiac function during the recovery period suggests that chronic tachycardia may have been an important cause of his cardiac dysfunction. thyrotoxicosis seemed to be directly responsible for the development of sustained supraventricular tachycardia in this patient, which then led to tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy causing severe low-output heart failure. Although relatively infrequent, this etiology should not be overlooked in patients thyrotoxicosis and heart failure. This is the first case in which the time course and the temporal relationship between the control of heart rate and the recovery of cardiac function are illustrated in a thyrotoxic patient.
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ranking = 1
keywords = supraventricular
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9/296. lidocaine-induced conduction disturbance in patients with systemic hyperkalemia.

    We report 2 cases in which lidocaine, given for wide-complex tachycardia in the presence of hyperkalemia, precipitated profound conduction disturbance and asystole. The electrophysiologic effects of hyperkalemia and its interaction with lidocaine are reviewed. In patients with known hyperkalemia and wide-complex tachycardia, treatment should be directed at hyperkalemia, rather than following treatment algorithms for wide-complex tachycardia.
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ranking = 0.0006369614547876
keywords = complex
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10/296. Concealed accessory pathway with long conduction times and incremental properties: a case report.

    Concealed AP with Slow and Incremental Conduction. We report a peculiar form of permanent junctional reciprocating tachycardia that occurs only during daytime and physical activity. ECG obtained during tachycardia showed an unusual progressive shortening of the ventriculoatrial (VA) interval that was maximal at the first complex and shortest at the last one before block occurred, always at the accessory pathway level. This phenomenon has not been previously described and appears to be a reverse type of Wenckebach block. It was observed during salvos of spontaneous tachycardia and could be reproduced by right ventricular pacing. The accessory pathway was ablated successfully at the right posteroseptal region, close to the coronary sinus ostium. After ablation, there was no VA conduction, and tachycardia did not recur during a 9-month follow-up period.
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ranking = 0.0002123204849292
keywords = complex
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