Cases reported "Takayasu Arteritis"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

11/127. Intramural haemorrhage of the colon.

    Two cases of acute abdominal crisis due to intramural haemorrhage of the colon are presented with a review of the literature. One was a 10-year-old Nigerian boy; the haemorrhage occurred in the caecum and ascending colon. The other was a 69-year-old Caucasian woman with a haemorrhage in the colonic splenic flexure and descending colon. Both had a one-stage resection with anastomosis. The child survived; the woman died two days after the operation. The preoperative diagnosis of bleeding colonic lesions remains difficult especially when facilities for investigation are scarce. It is re-emphasized that in patients with acute abdomen it is not necessary to insist on accurate preoperative diagnosis before offering appropriate treatment.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

12/127. adult Wilms' tumor presenting as acute abdomen with elevated serum lactate dehydrogenase-4 and -5 isoenzymes: case report.

    Wilms' tumor, an embryonic neoplasm, is the most frequent renal tumor in childhood but is rare in adults. The prognosis of adult Wilms' tumor is worse than pediatric Wilms' tumor. The preoperative diagnosis of adult Wilms' tumor is extremely difficult to make because diagnostic imaging techniques, such as intravenous pyelography, computed tomography, ultrasound, renal angiography, and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, only confirm the presence of a renal mass. diagnosis usually depends on histological characteristics, such as the presence of blastemic, epithelial, and mesenchymal components. A 27-year-old female presented with acute abdomen and with elevated serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) at 212 U/l (normal range: 47-140), and 2 of 5 LDH isoenzymes, namely LDH-4 at 13.6% (normal range: 6.8%-10.2%) and LDH-5 at 20% (normal range: 6.5%-9.7%). In this patient, stage I Wilms' tumor was managed by radical nephrectomy. The levels of LDH returned to its normal range. In conclusion, in cases of acute abdomen with a renal mass in young adults, the possibility of Wilms' tumor should be considered. serum LDH and its isoenzymes, LDH-4 and LDH-5, could be used as tumor markers for either differential diagnosis or monitoring the response of treatment.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

13/127. Laparoscopic diagnosis and treatment of an acute epiploic appendagitis with torsion and necrosis causing an acute abdomen.

    Acute epiploic appendagitis is not as rare as previously thought; but, since the presenting signs and symptoms are not specific, preoperative diagnosis has been rarely made. At the present time, a laparoscopic exploration of the peritoneal cavity will establish the correct diagnosis, and the treatment can be provided during the same procedure. Herein, a case of a 63-year-old female patient with acute abdominal syndrome caused by a necrotic epiploic appendix that was successfully diagnosed and treated laparoscopically is described. A review of the literature is made, as well.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

14/127. Spontaneous uterine perforation of pyometra. A report of three cases.

    BACKGROUND: Spontaneous perforation of pyometra is a rare cause of generalized peritonitis; only 17 cases have been reported. CASES: Three cases of spontaneous perforation of pyometra occurred; two were associated with carcinoma of the cervix. All were treated with exploratory laparotomy and drainage. The first patient died of recurrent carcinoma of the cervix five months after laparotomy. The second patient died of septic shock shortly after the operation. The third patient made a good postoperative recovery. CONCLUSION: pyometra is a serious medical condition, because of both its association with malignant disease and the danger of spontaneous perforation, which carries significant morbidity and mortality. Although rare, ruptured pyometra should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute abdomen in elderly women, especially those with malignant disorders of the genital tract. The treatment of pyometra rupture is immediate laparotomy, peritoneal lavage and drainage, or simple hysterectomy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

15/127. Amyand's hernia: prospective CT diagnosis.

    We report two cases of Amyand's hernia, which is the development of acute appendicitis within an inguinal hernia. Both patients were clinically thought to have incarcerated inguinal hernias, but were correctly prospectively diagnosed as having Amyand's hernia on the basis of preoperative computed tomography (CT) examinations. Our cases again show the utility of CT of the acute abdomen and pelvis in revealing a previously unsuspected diagnosis and rapidly triaging patients to the appropriate management.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

16/127. A new etiology of acute abdominal emergencies in cirrhotic patient: secondary pneumococcal peritonitis with jejunitis.

    We report the first case of secondary pneumococcal peritonitis associated with acute jejunitis in a 52-year-old homeless child-Pugh C cirrhotic man without ascitis. The patient was admitted with clinical signs of peritonitis, and jaundice. Morphologic examination was unremarkable. A laparotomy revealed a diffuse peritonitis, and an acute jejunitis with prenecrotic lesion. The lesion was located within the first centimeters of the jejunum, immediately after the duodeno-jejunal angle, extented on 15 cm. A resection of the first 15 cm of the jejunum was performed with duodeno-jejunal side-to-side manual anastomosis. Gram-stain and cultures of blood, peritoneal pus, and jejunal mucosa revealed a penicillin-sensitive streptococcus pneumoniae. Appropriate parenteral antibiotic treatment was initiated (aminopenicillin). The postoperative course was marked by a transient hepatic failure associated with an ascitis controlled by diuretics. The patient was discharged on the 26th day after surgery. This case reports a new etiology of acute abdominal emergencies in cirrhotic patients.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

17/127. Pneumonia presenting as acute abdomen in children: a report of three cases.

    From 10th September 1998 till 5th June 1999, the Paediatric and Cardiothoracic Surgery Units of Sultanah Aminah Hospital Johor Bahru managed three children with lung collapse secondary to pneumonia. The dominant initial clinical presentation in all three cases was acute abdominal pain. Basal pneumonia was diagnosed in two cases post-operatively after surgical contributory causes were excluded intra-operatively. thoracotomy, evacuation of infected debris and decortication of the collapsed lung was done in all three cases. In children presenting with acute abdominal pain, basal pneumonia should be considered as a possible contributory cause.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

18/127. Primary segmental infarction of the greater omentum: a rare cause of RLQ syndrome: laparoscopic resection.

    The authors report a rare case of a patient with a primary segmental infarction of the greater omentum who reported acute abdominal pain. Despite preoperative clinical studies and imaging evaluation, an etiologic diagnosis could not be determined. The diagnosis of this uncommon disease was determined after initial laparoscopic exploration. A laparoscopic resection was performed. The patient had an uneventful recovery and was discharged within 12 hours. The differential diagnosis of the right lower quadrant syndrome includes several disorders, of which the primary segmental infarction of the greater omentum is not frequent. The authors emphasize the usefulness of routine laparoscopic exploration in patients with RLQ syndrome because it adds the possibility of mini-invasive treatment to the initial diagnosis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

19/127. Laparoscopic management of colonoscopic perforations.

    Colonic perforation is a dangerous complication of colonoscopy, both diagnostic and therapeutic, and its management has become controversial. The question of conservative vs operative treatment is still under debate. Despite the recent expansion and wide acceptance of laparoscopy by surgeons, the feasibility of this technique as a means of treating abdominal emergencies has also been questioned. Of 575 patients admitted to our institution for abdominal emergencies between 1993 and 1998, 365 were treated via a laparoscopic approach. Two of these patients were treated for colonoscopic perforations, one after a diagnostic procedure and one after an operative procedure. Our technique employs an open umbilical approach with two other trocars introduced in the right iliac fossa and left flank. In the first case, a diverticular perforation of the subperitoneal rectum was suspected. The abdomen was copiously irrigated with saline solution and a drain was left in the pelvis. In the second patient, localized peritonitis was found in the left iliac fossa due to a microperforation of the sigmoid colon. It was repaired with a single absorbable suture. The postoperative course was unremarkable in both cases. In patients with an emergency abdomen due to a postcolonoscopy perforation, we consider the laparoscopic approach feasible and safe in experienced hands. It allowed us to avoid an unnecessary laparotomy and other time-consuming and expensive diagnostic investigations. This approach represents an excellent means of managing this type of emergency abdominal situation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.5
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

20/127. Ruptured true aneurysm of the splenic artery: an unusual cause of haemoperitoneum.

    True aneurysm of the splenic artery is rare. Two cases of ruptured true splenic artery aneurysms are presented. The first patient was a 62-year-old female who presented within 6 hours of the onset of symptoms. The other was a 27-year-old non-alcoholic male patient who was admitted in a state of shock after 2 days of observation in a peripheral hospital. Both patients had haemoperitoneum and were subjected to exploratory laparotomy. Aneurysmectomy was performed in both the patients in addition to left splenopancreatectomy in the first case and splenectomy in the second. However, due to the prolonged preoperative shock, the second patient succumbed on the third postoperative day.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)
<- Previous || Next ->



We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.