Cases reported "Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome"

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1/43. Anterior entrapment syndromes.

    The anterior tarsal tunnel syndrome is best described as a chronic irritation or compression of the deep peroneal nerve. The pathogenesis, etiology, and diagnostic features of the anterior tarsal tunnel as it effects the foot are discussed with its complexities. Case histories are presented.
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2/43. Anterior tarsal tunnel syndrome: case report.

    Anterior tarsal tunnel syndrome is a rare entrapment neuropathy involving the deep peroneal nerve beneath the inferior extensor retinaculum of the ankle and foot. This syndrome may be a clinically under-recognized entity, thus making a missed diagnosis and delayed treatment likely. We present the case of a 53-year-old woman who for many years had experienced the clinical symptoms of anterior tarsal tunnel syndrome, including pain in the dorsum of the right foot with numbness radiating to the first web space. Roentgenograms of the foot revealed osteophytes on the dorsum of the talus as it articulated with the navicular bone. During surgery, the osteophytes were found to be irritating the deep peroneal nerve. After surgical decompression of the anterior tarsal tunnel, the patient had a significant reduction of symptoms. One year later, she was noted to be asymptomatic with normal physical findings. We believe that this case points to the necessity of more thoughtful attention to this syndrome and its diagnosis. That is to say, a thorough knowledge of the pathogenesis and a comprehensive physical examination are the prerequisites for correct diagnosis and appropriate treatment.
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3/43. The accessory soleus and recurrent tarsal tunnel syndrome: case report of a new surgical approach.

    The accessory soleus muscle is a rare anatomic variant, which presents as a mass in the posteromedial aspect of the ankle. This anomaly has been linked with compression neuropathy of the posterior tibial nerve. The authors present a case of tarsal tunnel syndrome in which the presence of an accessory soleus was unrecognized at the time of the original procedure, but was utilized during the revisional operation to provide safe coverage of the posterior tibial nerve.
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4/43. tarsal tunnel syndrome: ultrasonographic and MRI features.

    tarsal tunnel syndrome is a well-known but rare entrapment neuropathy involving the posterior tibial nerve in the tarsal tunnel, a fibro-osseous channel extending from the medial aspect of the ankle to the midfoot. Posttraumatic fibrosis, ganglion cyst, tenosynovitis, tumor of the nerves or other structures, dilated or tortuous veins can cause significant nerve compression in this anatomic region. Herein, we present the typical ultrasonographic and magnetic resonance features of this disorder in patient with a ganglion cyst.
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5/43. tarsal tunnel syndrome secondary to neurilemoma--a case report.

    Peripheral nerve entrapment syndromes in the foot include those symptom complexes that are primarily neurologic in origin and result from embarrassment to any of the peripheral nerve trunks or branches of the foot. tarsal tunnel syndrome usually is precipitated by compression of the tibial nerve posterior and distal to the medial malleolus. A neurilemoma is relatively uncommon in the foot. It is usually a solitary tumor that is almost exclusively benign and can be removed without jeopardizing the integrity of the nerve. diagnosis is based on a thorough history and clinical pictures. Certain diagnostic modalities, ultrasound and MRI, have been employed to aid in diagnosis. Surgical excision of the tumor remains the treatment of choice.
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6/43. Acute tarsal tunnel syndrome following partial avulsion of the flexor hallucis longus muscle: a case report.

    An acute posterior tibial nerve compression from a partially ruptured flexor hallucis longus (FHL) muscle is reported. This etiology for acute tarsal tunnel syndrome has not been previously described. A 17-year-old male sustained multiple injuries in a motor vehicle accident, including a tibial shaft fracture and a posterior medial right ankle laceration of the same limb. The injured limb had no sensation on the plantar aspect of the foot and heel, decreased active great toe flexion, and associated leg pain. Exploration of the posterior tibial nerve for presumed laceration revealed the nerve to be intact, but compressed in a tense tarsal tunnel from a retracted partially ruptured flexor hallucis longus tendon. decompression of the tunnel and resection of the devascularized muscle resulted in complete neurologic recovery.
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7/43. An unusual presentation of tarsal tunnel syndrome caused by an inflatable ice hockey skate.

    BACKGROUND: tarsal tunnel syndrome is a rare form of entrapment neuropathy. In athletes, it is usually the result of repetitive activity, local injury or a space-occupying lesion. Rarely, athletic footwear has been described as the primary cause of this syndrome. methods: A 37-year-old male recreational hockey player was examined clinically and electrophysiologically because of spreading numbness in the toes of his left foot while playing hockey and wearing inflatable ice hockey skates designed to promote a better fit. RESULTS: Clinical and electrophysiological studies revealed evidence of left medial and lateral plantar nerve involvement. Reduced amplitudes of mixed and motor plantar nerve responses with fibrillation potentials and positive sharp waves and no evidence of conduction block suggest that the primary pathology was axonal loss. Follow-up examination showed significant clinical and electrophysiological improvement after the patient stopped wearing his inflatable ice hockey skates. CONCLUSION: We report an unusual case of tarsal tunnel syndrome caused by an inflatable ice hockey skate. The patient improved clinically and electrophysiologically when he stopped wearing the boot.
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8/43. Anterior tarsal tunnel syndrome.

    Anterior tarsal tunnel syndrome is a rarely reported entrapment neuropathy of the deep peroneal nerve under the extensor retinaculum at the ankle. The roof of the tunnel is the inferior extensor retinaculum. The floor is the fascia overlying the talus and navicular. Within the tunnel are four tendons, an artery, a vein, and the deep peroneal nerve. Two patients with foot pain and dysesthesias had prolonged peroneal distal latencies with reduced amplitudes from the extensor digitorum brevis (EDB). Electromyographic (EMG) abnormalities were confined to the EDB. Both patients underwent surgical decompression of the anterior tarsal tunnel with reduction of their pain and dysesthesias. If present, an accessory peroneal nerve, which does not go through the tunnel, can mask EMG findings in the EDB. Diagnosing anterior tarsal tunnel syndrome can also be difficult if there is a tendency to assume that fibrillation potentials in the EDB are due to shoe wear and prolonged peroneal latencies to cool extremities.
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9/43. tarsal tunnel syndrome caused by epineural ganglion of the posterior tibial nerve: report of 2 cases and review of the literature.

    ganglia within the posterior tibial nerve is a rare condition. The authors report 2 cases of epineural ganglion of the posterior tibial nerve, causing tarsal tunnel syndrome. Both cases presented with numbness on the plantar surface of the foot. magnetic resonance imaging showed the presence of the cyst within the tarsal tunnel. During surgery, these cysts were found within the epineurium of the posterior tibial nerve and were successfully removed without damage to nerve fibers. Both patients were free of symptoms after surgery. ganglion cysts in the peripheral nerve are either intrafascicular or epineural. Intrafascicular ganglia present beneath the epineurium and involve the nerve fibers, whereas epineural ganglia are located in the epineurium and do not involve the nerve fibers. A review of the literature discusses these concepts. The authors suggest that epineural ganglion should be clinically distinctive from an intrafascicular ganglion because of the differences in surgical treatment, postoperative nerve function, and the recurrence rate.
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10/43. fibromyalgia and Tinel's sign in the foot.

    In the physical examination of the patient suspected of having tarsal tunnel syndrome, the podiatric physician relies on Tinel's sign: tapping the posterior tibial nerve in the tarsal tunnel should produce a distally radiating sensation if the nerve is pathologically compressed at this location. The American College of rheumatology recognizes fibromyalgia as a condition characterized by multiple "tender points" on physical examination. This report compares the locations of the 18 critical diagnostic fibromyalgia points with known sites of anatomical entrapment of peripheral nerves in the lower extremity. We also describe a patient with both fibromyalgia and tarsal tunnel syndrome. Tinel's sign in the lower extremity is a valid technique for assessing peripheral nerve compression in the patient with fibromyalgia.
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