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1/3. Features and treatment of skeletal class III malocclusion with severe lateral mandibular shift and asymmetric vertical dimension.

    AIM: To highlight the effectiveness of orthodontic treatment and bilateral equalization of the vertical occlusal dimension, along with the correction of asymmetric cervical and masticatory muscle activities in patients with Class III malocclusion with lateral deviation of the mandible and severely asymmetric condyle and ramus. methods: Two normally growing and one nongrowing Japanese patients with severe lateral deviation of the mandible, asymmetric vertical occlusal dimension, and severely asymmetric temporomandibular joints are discussed. In addition to orthodontic treatment, all patients received physiotherapy of the cervical muscles and gum-chewing training for elimination of the masticatory muscular imbalance. patients also had postural training during treatment. All patients were treated with a bite plate to equalize the bilateral posterior vertical dimension, followed by full multi-bracketed treatment to establish a stable form of occlusion and to improve facial esthetics. RESULTS: This interdisciplinary treatment approach resulted in normalization of stomatognathic function, elimination of temporomandibular joint dysfunction symptoms, and improvement of facial appearance and posture. In growing patients, the significant response of the fossa, condyle, and ramus on the affected side during and after occlusal correction contributed to the improvement of cervical muscle activity. In contrast, less improvement was observed in the growing patient who did not receive physiotherapy of the neck muscles, postural training, or masticatory habit training during the posttreatment period. The nongrowing patient showed little morphologic improvement of the cervical spine, condyle, and fossa during treatment and after retention, even with physiotherapy of the neck muscles and attention to posture and masticatory habits. CONCLUSION: Based on these results, early occlusal improvement, combined with physiotherapy to achieve muscular balance of the neck and masticatory muscles, was found to be effective. It is important to assess the morphology and function of the neck muscles and cervical spine prior to occlusal therapy in patients with an asymmetric vertical dimension, lateral deviation of the mandible, and asymmetric temporomandibular joint structures. Therapy should correlate orthopedic and surgical patient management as needed.
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ranking = 1
keywords = stomatognathic
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2/3. Evaluation of stomatognathic function in orthodontic treatment.

    AIM: To evaluate changes in stomatognathic function related to orthodontic treatment in 4 patients with various types of dysfunction of the stomatognathic system present prior to orthodontic treatment. methods: Four patients who visited the Orthodontic Clinic at tokyo Medical and Dental University Hospital and whose active orthodontic treatment was complete were analyzed both morphologically and functionally. To analyze stomatognathic function, electromyographic activity of the masticatory muscles and mandibular movements was recorded. RESULTS: In all 4 patients, changes in stomatognathic function were observed following improvements in craniofacial structural and interocclusal relationships. Many of these changes consisted of elimination of functional disharmony, although the cause-effect relationship between these functional changes and orthodontic treatment is unclear. CONCLUSION: Functional analysis during orthodontic treatment can provide useful information concerning the relationship between craniofacial structures and stomatognathic function.
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ranking = 9
keywords = stomatognathic
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3/3. Characteristics of condylar movements during mastication in stomatognathic dysfunction.

    In this investigation of the relationship between mastication and TMJ abnormalities, the movements of the incisal point and condyles during mastication were analyzed in two normal subjects and six patients with unilateral TMJ abnormalities. The path of the nonworking condyle was shorter than that of the working condyle when patients chewed on the side of the normal TMJ, causing the mandible to deviate to the abnormal side at the point of transition from opening to closing. Also, the mobility of the abnormal condyle influenced the convexity of the opening path, and posterior dislocation of the condyle resulted in a crossover chewing pattern.
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ranking = 4
keywords = stomatognathic
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