Cases reported "Tendon Injuries"

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1/86. Fibular nonunion and equinovarus deformity secondary to posterior tibial tendon incarceration in the syndesmosis: a case report after a bimalleolar fracture-dislocation.

    A 39-year-old woman sustained a grade II open bimalleolar fracture-dislocation of the left ankle. Six months after an ORIF of these fractures was performed, she presented with a nonunion of the distal fibula fracture and with a fixed hindfoot equinovarus and forefoot adduction deformity. At surgery for repair of the fibular nonunion, the posterior tibial tendon (PTT) was found to be entrapped in the posterior tibiotalar joint, with a portion of the tendon interposed between the tibia and the fibula in the area of the posterior syndesmosis. After extrication of the PTT, the hindfoot varus and forefoot adduction deformity were corrected. To our knowledge, this is the first case report in the English literature of a missed PTT syndesmotic entrapment that resulted in a fibular nonunion and in a fixed foot deformity after an open bimalleolar ankle fracture dislocation.
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2/86. Checkrein deformity--an unusual complication associated with a closed Salter-Harris Type II ankle fracture: a case report.

    This article presents a case of tethering of the flexor hallucis longus (FHL) tendon (checkrein deformity) and rupture of the posterior tibialis tendon after a closed Salter-Harris Type II ankle fracture. Delayed repair was affected by tenolysis of the FHL and flexor digitorum longus tendons and tenodesis of the posterior tibialis to the flexor digitorum longus tendon. This case represents the first such report of concomitant entrapment of the FHL tendon and rupture of the posterior tibialis tendon after a closed ankle fracture.
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3/86. rotator cuff tears of the hip.

    pain over the lateral aspect of the hip commonly is attributed to trochanteric bursitis. Typical findings include local tenderness and weakness of hip abduction. When conservative measures fail to relieve symptoms, surgical release of the iliotibial band over the greater trochanter has been recommended. In the management of seven such patients, an unusual finding was encountered: partial tear of the gluteus medius tendon at its attachment to the greater trochanter. Each patient presented with increasing hip pain of duration of months to years. There were no diagnostic findings on physical examination. magnetic resonance imaging showed an abnormal signal within the tendon of gluteus medius and fluid within the trochanteric bursa. The disrupted tendons were reattached to bone with heavy nonabsorbable suture. At a median followup of 45 months (range, 21-60 months), all patients were free of pain.
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4/86. The use of magnetic resonance imaging in posterior tibial tendon dysfunction.

    The role of magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of the patient with posterior tibial tendon dysfunction is discussed. Considerations for the proper positioning of the patient and optimal technique to obtain appropriate images of the posterior tibial tendon and associated joint abnormalities are highlighted. Cases are presented to show the effectiveness of magnetic resonance imaging in different clinical situations. The treatment algorithm for posterior tibial tendon dysfunction should include magnetic resonance imaging as a diagnostic tool when appropriate.
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5/86. Traumatic rupture of the tibialis posterior tendon after ankle fracture: a case report.

    Degenerative tears of the posterior tibial tendon associated with chronic disease are well documented in the literature. Traumatic ruptures of this tendon, however, are much less common and consequently have received little attention. An association has been shown between pronation-external rotation ankle fractures and tears of the tendons that cross the medial aspect of the ankle, most commonly the posterior tibial tendon. In the present case report, we share our unique experience of an open-ankle fracture associated with the traumatic rupture of the posterior tibial tendon. This injury illustrates that soft-tissue injury must always be suspected concomitantly in the treatment of certain fractures on the basis of both mechanism of injury and fracture pattern.
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6/86. rupture of the tibialis anterior tendon.

    Closed rupture of the tendon of tibialis anterior is an infrequently reported entity. A thorough review of the literature was performed with 49 reported cases of this condition identified. Those patients who were treated conservatively experienced late sequelae, including continued slapping of the foot, mild to moderate flatfoot deformity, and ankle arthrosis. Low morbidity associated with surgical reconstruction should preclude only the most sedentary of patients from operative treatment.
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7/86. 'Fat fracture'--a physical sign mimicking tendon rupture.

    The imaging techniques available to aid the diagnosis of ruptures of tendo Achillis, the rotator cuff and the tendon of tibialis posterior in rheumatoid patients are well described. However, ruptures of tendon or muscle at other sites are uncommon and may be overlooked. diagnosis is often made by localised tenderness, swelling and a lack of active movement associated with a palpable defect. Clinical examination may be inconclusive and can be aided by imaging studies. We report two cases in which ruptures of a tendon were suspected, and ultrasound imaging demonstrated the palpable defect to be a cleavage plane in the subcutaneous fat--a 'fat fracture'.
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8/86. Split biceps femoris tendon reconstruction for proximal tibiofibular joint instability.

    Recurrent instability of the proximal tibiofibular joint is an infrequently diagnosed abnormality. We present a new technique for reconstructing the joint using a split biceps femoris tendon passed through a bone tunnel in both the proximal tibial metaphysis and fibular head. The case report is also presented. The procedure offers an anatomic reconstruction and firm stabilization. It allows normal motion of the proximal tibiofibular joint and preserves the normal mechanics of the ankle. This procedure is an excellent alternative to resection of the fibular head, transarticular arthrodesis, or pseudoarthrosis focus at the fibular head.
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9/86. Neglected ruptures of the patellar tendon. A case series of four patients.

    We describe a series of four patients treated for chronic ruptures of the patellar tendon (more than 6 months old). The proximally retracted patella was brought back to its anatomic position, and the tendon stumps were repaired and protected with multiple strands of strong circlage wire, in a figure-of-8 pattern, from the quadriceps tendon to the tibial tubercle. Postoperatively, immediate mobilization without the use of a brace was initiated. The patients averaged 29 months (range, 8 to 80) from the time of injury until definitive treatment and were observed for an average of 27 months (range, 11 to 40) after treatment. Before treatment, all patients had an extensor lag of at least 20 degrees. At initial follow-up, all patients had full active extension with no extensor lag, and this did not deteriorate postoperatively or after wire removal. At the last follow-up, the average flexion was 0 degrees to 112 degrees. This technique avoids the use of autograft or allograft tissue and does not require lengthening of the quadriceps tendon.
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keywords = tibia
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10/86. Closed rupture of the anterior tibial tendon. A case report and review of the literature.

    Closed rupture of the anterior tibial tendon is an unusual injury. It occurs in middle-aged to elderly males following forced plantar flexion of the ankle. A case is presented of a 69-year-old man with spondylolisthesis whose tendon ruptured during a physical examination. The injury was thought initially to represent an acute L5 root compression secondary to a herniated intervertebral disc at the level of his spondylolisthesis. The correct diagnosis was made after admission to the hospital. Surgical repair of the tendon resulted in normal ankle motion and strength. A review of the 12 previously reported cases indicates that treatment has been either surgical repair or conservative management. All patients recovered a normal gait but those treated surgically had more motion and dorsiflexion strength. This condition emphasizes the importance of exact history taking and thorough physical examination.
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