Cases reported "Tenosynovitis"

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1/14. Flexor tenosynovitis in the hand caused by Mycobacterium terrae.

    The authors describe an uncommon case of flexor tenosynovitis caused by Mycobacterium terrae, an atypical mycobacterium generally considered nonpathogenic in humans. A prolonged delay in diagnosis and various ineffective therapies led to synovial biopsy and culture. After confirming the diagnosis of M. terrae, appropriate antimycobacterial chemotherapy resolved the synovitis. For chronic tenosynovitis without a clear etiology, limited synovectomy and culture are essential in establishing a diagnosis and in initiating treatment for this atypical mycobacterial infection.
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2/14. mycobacterium marinum causing tenosynovitis. 'Fish tank finger'.

    mycobacterium marinum is an unusual atypical mycobacterium with low pathogenicity for humans in comparison with mycobacterium tuberculosis. Among the non-tuberculous mycobacterial pathogens, mycobacterium marinum is the most common pathogen to cause skin infections. mycobacterium marinum infection causes chronic cutaneous lesions and in some cases deeper infections such as tenosynovitis, septic arthritis and rarely osteomyelitis. We report the case of a male patient presenting with tenosynovitis of the distal upper extremity secondary to mycobacterium marinum infection.
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3/14. Mycobacterium heckeshornense tenosynovitis.

    We describe the first case of tenosynovitis due to Mycobacterium heckeshornense, a mycobacterium characterized in 2000 and only incriminated in a few previous cases of infections. Molecular identification of this pathogen included 16S rRNA and hsp65 gene sequencing. M. heckeshornense may cause a wide spectrum of human infectious diseases and may be underestimated due to its phenotypic relatedness with mycobacterium xenopi.
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4/14. Atypical mycobacterium soft-tissue infection of the dorsal radial wrist: a possible complication of steroid injection for de Quervain's disease.

    Corticosteroid injection into the first dorsal compartment for acute de Quervain's tenosynovitis is an accepted form of therapy. Potential side effects include soft-tissue atrophy, tendon attrition, postinjection neuritis of the superficial radial nerve, systemic reactions, and infection. We present a patient with a Mycobacterium chelonei infection localized to the soft tissue overlying the first dorsal compartment, occurring 3 years after a triamcinolone injection into this area. Histological examination with the polarizing microscope revealed persistent steroid granules in the involved tissue. Successful treatment consisted of complete excision of the involved skin and subcutaneous tissue followed by delayed closure. Systemic antibiotics were not used.
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keywords = mycobacterium
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5/14. Mycobacterium terrae tenosynovitis.

    Atypical mycobacteria causing extra-pulmonary disease in man are well documented. These infections are manifested by the presence of ulcers, abscesses and lymphadenitis. mycobacterium marinum is particularly noted for infections involving the synovium, tendon sheaths, bursae and bone. Of lesser note is Mycobacterium terrae (radish bacillus), a nonchromogen also associated with tenosynovitis. We are not aware of any previous report of the association of M. terrae with synovitis in australia. This case report describes a culture-proven case of tenosynovitis caused by M. terrae.
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ranking = 0.032821116503892
keywords = bacillus
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6/14. Chronic tenosynovitis caused by actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    This is the first report of a patient with a history of painless chronic flexor tenosynovitis caused by actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. The slow growth of the organism on culture makes early identification difficult. Flexor tenosynovitis along with proper antibiotic treatment resulted in complete resolution in this patient.
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ranking = 0.16410558251946
keywords = bacillus
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7/14. The clinicopathological spectrum of non-tuberculous mycobacterial osteoarticular infections.

    We studied the clinicopathological features of eight patients in whom a non-tuberculous mycobacterium was unexpectedly isolated from osteoarticular material obtained at operation. Three distinct types of infection with non-tuberculous mycobacteria were found: tenosynovitis, synovitis, and osteomyelitis. Tissue specimens from these sites showed a spectrum of pathological findings, including (1) virtually no inflammation, (2) mild to severe non-specific chronic inflammation, (3) granulomas without necrosis, and (4) caseating epithelioid granulomas that were indistinguishable from those of tuberculosis. In six patients the infection responded well to adequate surgical excision alone. In the remaining two the infection responded to surgical intervention and antituberculous therapy.
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8/14. tenosynovitis of the forearm due to Mycobacterium terrae (radish bacillus).

    A patient had tenosynovitis of the forearm due to Mycobacterium terrae complex. The condition responded well to the combination of surgery and antituberculous chemotherapy.
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ranking = 0.13128446601557
keywords = bacillus
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9/14. Tuberculoid tenosynovitis and carpal tunnel syndrome caused by Mycobacterium szulgai.

    Mycobacterium szulgai, a scotochromogenic mycobacterium, is a newly recognized pathogen of man and has been reported to cause pulmonary infections, olecranon bursitis and cervical adenitis. We isolated M. szulfai from granulomatous tissue removed at surgery from a young florist with the carpal tunnel syndrome. The organism was susceptible to ethambutol and rifampin but resistant to isoniazid. Cure was achieved by debridement and chemotherapy with ethambutol and rifampin. Neither the source in our patient nor the natural habitat of M. szulgai is known. Because it resembles M. gordonae and M. flavescens, common scotochromogenic mycobacteria in tapwater, care must be taken to avoid dismissing M. szulgai as a contaminant when it is isolated from tissue.
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keywords = mycobacterium
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10/14. Sausage digit due to radish bacillus.

    We wish to draw attention to a very characteristic but little known syndrome. An elderly woman presented with a 'sausage finger', rheumatological jargon used to describe diffuse swelling of the digit. This proved to be a proliferative tenosynovitis caused by an atypical mycobacterium, Mycobacterium terrae, or the radish bacillus.
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ranking = 1.1641055825195
keywords = mycobacterium, bacillus
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