Cases reported "Teratoma"

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1/13. Germ cell neoplasms in three intersex patients with 46,XY karyotype.

    This report presents 3 cases with gonadoblastoma mixed with other germ cell tumours in intersex patients, all with a 46,XY karyotype. One 11-year-old patient was a true hermaphrodite, the others, aged 13 and 18, respectively, had both gonadal dysgenesis. Different clinical courses have been noted. Two patients had gonadoblastoma combined with dysgerminoma; in one of them a teratoma was also found. In the third case gonadoblastoma was transformed into teratocarcinoma. The malignant degeneration was more serious in the 2 pubertal patients. Thus, we recommend early and prophylactic gonadectomy.
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2/13. Growing teratoma syndrome vs chemotherapeutic retroconversion: case report and review of the literature.

    BACKGROUND: Immature ovarian teratoma is the third most common germ cell tumor (GCT) following dysgerminoma and endodermal sinus tumor. The treatment of choice during childbearing age for immature teratoma composes of unilateral oophorectomy and in case of metastatic disease postoperative chemotherapy (BEP). Finding a solid mass in the peritoneal or chest cavity during routine follow up raises the suspicion of distance recurrence. DiSaia was the first to describe the appearance of benign distant metastasis during routine follow up. He termed this phenomenon "chemotherapeutic retroconversion". Latter, Logothetis described what seems to be a similar phenomenon in testicular non-seminomatous germ cell tumor (NSGCT) that he called the "growing teratoma syndrome". CASE: We present a case of a 12-year-old girl treated for growing teratoma syndrome after primary ovarian GCT. CONCLUSION: review of the literature shows that this syndrome and the "chemotherapeutic retroconversion" are probably the same phenomenon.
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3/13. Familial female and male germ cell cancer. A new syndrome?

    BACKGROUND: A small percentage of germ cell tumors is known to be familial. There are several reports describing familial cases of testicular germ cell tumors; however, there are only a few of them reporting germ cell tumors that occurred in both males and females of the same family. CASE: We present a family with three children, two females and one male, previously healthy, who all developed germ cell malignancies. The first sibling was diagnosed with malignant teratoma of the ovary, the second one with dysgerminoma involving both ovaries, and the male one with both embryonal carcinoma and seminoma of the testicle. CONCLUSION: Our case report suggests that the possibility of an association between germ cell tumors of both ovaries and testis should be considered.
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4/13. Twisted mixed germ cell tumor of the ovary in a child.

    We report an 8-year-old female patient with a mixed germ cell stromal tumor MGCT of the left ovary. Exploration revealed that the tumor had been twisted around its pedicle. These ovarian tumors are classified among interesting type of tumors due to the variability of neoplastic tissues in the same tumor mass, in the twisted ovarian tumor. Four histological types of tumor tissues were found: well-differentiated adenocarcinoma, dysgerminoma, immature teratoma, and focus of papillary serous cyst adenoma as well. During our review of the literature, this reported case of MGCT of the ovary was among the extremely rare cases, which had been reported. Mixed germ cell tumor is well documented in the literature since 1950.
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5/13. Mixed germ cell tumor of the ovary with pure choriocarcinoma metastasis.

    A case report of a 30-month disease-free survival in a ten-year-old girl with ovarian mixed germ cell tumor consisting of dysgerminoma, choriocarcinoma, and immature teratoma with pure choriocarcinoma paraaortic lymph node metastasis is presented. To prevent resistant cell colonies, the noncross-resistant combination of vinblastine-Adriamycin and vinblastine-actinomycin D-cytoxan were added to the initial four courses of vinblastine-cisplatin-bleomycin. There are no previously reported survivals in ovarian mixed germ cell tumors with pure choriocarcinoma metastasis.
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keywords = dysgerminoma
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6/13. A chromosome study of three ovarian tumors.

    The cytogenetic results of three different types of malignant ovarian tumors are reported. Their chromosomes were studied indirectly by using either peritoneal washings or ascitic fluids. Detected in the peritoneal washings from a treated case of serous cystadenocarcinoma with papillary involvement, stage III, was a clone of pseudodiploid cells. They were found after 12 months of chemotherapy. No supporting evidence of malignancy was found cytologically. Relatively simple karyotypes were obtained from metaphases found in the ascitic fluid of a patient surgically treated for an immature teratoma, stage II, grade 3. Consistent abnormalities found were trisomy 2, del(3)(p14), and der(5)t(5;8)(q33;q11). Of prime interest in a case of dysgerminoma, stage IV, was the finding of the isochromosome i(12p), a recognized nonrandom abnormality of malignant testicular tumors [1-5].
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7/13. Ovarian dysgerminoma with embryonal carcinoma: A case report.

    The association of an ovarian dysgerminoma with embryonal carcinoma in a 19-year-old woman is described. This is a highly malignant combination resulting in very rapid tumour growth and dissemination. A case report is presented and the aetiology, malignant potential and subsequent management of this most unusual tumour are discussed.
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keywords = dysgerminoma
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8/13. The deduction of tumor histogenesis, with special reference to teratomas and ovarian tumors.

    The secure deduction of tumor histogenesis in vivo is notoriously difficult, owing to the retrospective form of the inquiry, which implies that no histogenetic theory makes certain-enough predictions. Deduction of a tumor's parent tissue currently relies on 1) its location relative to that of small early tumors, 2) correlation of its relative availability with tumor frequency, 3) its resemblance to the tumor tissue in various respects, and 4) its microscopic continuity with the tumor through transitional forms. Each of these criteria has pitfalls, owing to possible failure of the relevant factor to persist or to subsequent mimicry of it by other processes. This makes reliance on only one or two criteria undesirable. The application of these criteria to teratomas shows that there are no convincing data provided by the fourth. A dysgerminoma containing multiple small teratoid foci, which was studied in detail, is described, and the origin of the second tissue from the first is argued. The apparently somatic origin of some of the mesenchyma and the role of the mesenchyma in promoting teratoma development and segregation are discussed.
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9/13. Benign clinical behavior of immature mediastinal teratoma in infancy and childhood: report of two cases and review of the literature.

    Germ cell tumors of the mediastinum can be divided into three categories: 1) mature teratomas which have all elements at a mature level; 2) immature teratomas which are similar to the mature teratomas, but also contain immature epithelial or mesenchymal elements or blastema; and 3) embryonal tumors which contains elements which are recognized as dysgerminoma, embryonal carcinoma with or without yolk sac elements, and choriocarcinoma. Immature teratomas are the rarest type, accounting for only about 1% of mediastinal teratomas. Two cases of immature teratoma of the mediastinum occurring in infants are reported. One tumor was completely excised. The child is well without evidence of disease two years later. The other immature teratoma was unresectable. biopsy showed it to be similar to the teratoma that was excised. No postoperative treatment was given. The tumor has not changed appreciably in size, but the child has grown normally for six years so that the tumor mass, which initially filled his chest, is now evidenced as mediastinal widening. A review of the reported cases of immature teratomas in the mediastinum shows that the prognostic value of the histologic appearance of these tumors has not been developed to the same degree as it has for teratomas in the ovary or the sacrococcygeal region. The immature teratomas that occur in infants behave as mass lesions as do the mature teratomas. Immature teratomas in the mediastinum of children in their late teens and in young adults behave as highly malignant tumors similar to the embryonal carcinomas.
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keywords = dysgerminoma
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10/13. Malignant teratoma arising in a dysgenetic gonad.

    A case of malignant teratoma arising within a dysgenetic gonad in a 21-year-old phenotypic female with a 46 XY karyotype is presented. Admixtures of dysgerminoma, yolk sac tumor in close juxtaposition to embryoid bodies and elements of choriocarcinoma were also present. The contralateral gonad was an unidentifiable fibrovascular streak. Neither gonadoblastoma nor coarse calcifications (such as commonly found in gonadoblastoma) could be identified. We believe that the present case arose de novo in a dysgenetic gonad and, uncharacteristically, was not associated with a gonadoblastoma.
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keywords = dysgerminoma
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