Cases reported "Testicular Neoplasms"

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1/157. Metastatic testicular teratoma of the nasal cavity: a rare cause of severe intractable epistaxis.

    Malignant neoplasms of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses are uncommon. choriocarcinoma is a highly malignant germ cell tumour occurring in the reproductive organs. Metastasis may be principally by the lymphatic route as in other germ cell tumours but choriocarcinoma is also known to spread haematogenously. We present a rare case of metastatic choriocarcinoma to the nasal cavity from testicular teratoma presenting with intractable epistaxis in a 32-year-old Caucasian male, who ultimately succumbed to this disease.
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ranking = 1
keywords = cell tumour
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2/157. carney complex: in a patient with multiple blue naevi and lentigines, suspect cardiac myxoma.

    carney complex is characterized by spotty pigmentation (blue naevi and lentigines), myxomas (cardiac, cutaneous, mammary), endocrine over-activity (Cushing's syndrome, acromegaly), testicular tumours, and schwannomas. We report a male with multiple blue naevi, lentigines, testicular large cell calcifying Sertoli-cell tumour and four cardiac myxomas. The myxomas caused two cerebrovascular accidents and a myocardial infarction. All patients with multiple blue naevi or lentigines should be investigated for the life-threatening association of cardiac myxomas.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = cell tumour
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3/157. A lesson in the management of testicular cancer in a patient with a solitary testis.

    Five per cent of patients with germ cell tumours of the testis will develop a further tumour in the contralateral testis. Standard treatment in such cases is a second orchidectomy, resulting in infertility, hormone replacement, and psychological morbidity. In this case report we explore the role of testis conservation in these patients and also show that there is a risk of removing a potentially normal testis if a histological diagnosis is not sought prior to orchidectomy.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = cell tumour
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4/157. Conversion of multiple solid testicular teratoma metastases to fatty and cystic liver masses following chemotherapy: CT evidence of "maturation".

    Testicular germ cell tumour metastases may undergo "retroconversion" to mature differentiated teratoma following chemotherapy or irradiation. We report a patient with testicular germ cell liver metastases in whom computed tomography (CT) scans following chemotherapy demonstrated a reduction in CT attenuation of the liver lesions to that of cystic and fatty density. This is believed to represent CT evidence of liver metastasis "retroconversion", which offers the potential for non-invasive monitoring of histological progression.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = cell tumour
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5/157. Clinics in diagnostic imaging (44). Testicular tumour with retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy and inferior vena cava thrombosis.

    A 20-year-old Indian man presented with a two week history of non-specific abdominal pain. Abdominal ultrasonograpy incidentally detected a thrombus in the inferior vena cava (IVC). Computed tomography revealed the presence of extensive para-aortic lymph node disease as well as a filling defect in the IVC. Scrotal ultrasonography located a heterogeneous intra-testicular tumour in an otherwise palpably-normal testis. The extent of the IVC thrombus was evaluated by the use of magnetic resonance imaging. Inguinal orchidectomy was performed and histology revealed a non-seminomatous germ cell tumour. Combination chemotherapy led to complete resolution of lymph node disease and IVC thrombus. The patient remained well 9 months after diagnosis. The causes of IVC obstruction, role of imaging in investigating IVC obstruction and the management of tumour involvement of the IVC are discussed.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = cell tumour
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6/157. Large-cell calcifying Sertoli cell tumour of the testis: associated organ anomalies.

    A case is reported of unilateral, focal large-cell calcifying Sertoli cell tumour (LCCSCT) of the testis associated with complex endocrine disorders and cardiac myxomas. It is believed that there are two distinct groups of patients with this tumour: those who have complex dysplastic syndromes and bilateral and multifocal tumours; and those without any syndromes but who have unilateral and focal tumours. The presented case differs in that, although the patient has a unilateral focal tumour, unique organ anomalies, such as renal agenesis and inferior vena cava duplication, are also present. These anomalies with LCCSCT have not been reported before.
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ranking = 2.5
keywords = cell tumour
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7/157. granulosa cell tumor of the adult type: a case report and review of the literature of a very rare testicular tumor.

    We report a case of testicular granulosa cell tumor of the adult type in a 48-year-old man. Microscopically, the tumor consisted of round to ovoid cells with grooved nuclei that were arranged in several patterns, including microfollicular, macrofollicular, insular, trabecular, gyriform, solid, and pseudosarcomatous. These cells demonstrated strong immunopositivity with MIC2 (O13) antibody, vimentin, and smooth muscle actin and focal positivity with cytokeratin. Although this type of sex cord-stromal tumor is relatively common in the ovaries, it is still extremely unusual in the testis, and it probably represents the rarest type of testicular sex cord-stromal tumor.
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ranking = 0.92954824953448
keywords = granulosa cell, granulosa
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8/157. Isolated central nervous system relapse of non-seminomatous germ cell tumour of the testis. A case report and review of the literature.

    Isolated central nervous system (CNS) relapse of non-seminomatous germ cell tumour (NSGCT) of the testis has been reported in only 12 patients previously. We report a patient with an isolated CNS relapse of NSGCT, following a prior systemic relapse. From a review of previous cases, isolated CNS relapse appears to be more common in patients with embryonal cell histology (alone or mixed with other elements) and occurred after a median of 8.5 months following initial presentation. Long-term survival appears possible using multi-modal treatment with whole-brain radiotherapy, surgery and/or chemotherapy. However, the optimal treatment of isolated CNS relapse remains undefined.
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ranking = 2.5
keywords = cell tumour
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9/157. Spontaneous acute tumour lysis syndrome in patients with metastatic germ cell tumours. Report of two cases.

    Acute tumour lysis syndrome (TLS), a condition resulting from rapid destruction of tumour cells with massive release of cellular breakdown products, has been described following the treatment of various malignancies. However, spontaneous TLS has been described only rarely. Germ cell tumours (GCT) have a rapid cell turnover and often present with bulky metastatic disease. We report two cases of patients with metastatic GCT presenting with acute renal failure attributable to spontaneous TLS. All clinical and biochemical features of the syndrome were present. Both patients were treated with haemodialysis and intravenous administration of single-agent etoposide between dialysis sessions, resulting in recovery of renal function and marked decrease in tumour bulk within the first week after presentation. These cases are the first reported instances of spontaneous TLS in poor-risk metastatic GCT. Successful treatment with dialysis and chemotherapy is possible, and prophylactic vigorous hydration and allopurinol may be warranted in this setting.
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ranking = 2.5
keywords = cell tumour
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10/157. granulosa cell tumor of scrotal tunics: a case report.

    We report a case of adult granulosa cell tumor arising in the scrotal tunics. The patient was a 34-year-old man who presented with right scrotal swelling, first noticed four months previously. Under the initial clinical impression of epididymoorchitis, antibiotic treatment was instituted but there was no response. The paratesticular nodules revealed by ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging mimicked intratesticular lesion, and radical orchiectomy was performed. Although several cases of adult testicular granulosa cell tumor, have been reported, the occurrence of this entity in the paratesticular area has not, as far as we are aware, been previously described.
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ranking = 1.859096499069
keywords = granulosa cell, granulosa
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