Cases reported "Tetralogy of Fallot"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/70. cyanosis due to diastolic right-to-left shunting across a ventricular septal defect in a patient with repaired tetralogy of fallot and pulmonary atresia.

    cyanosis as a result of right-to-left shunting across a ventricular septal defect is commonly encountered in patients with congenital heart disease when systolic pressure in the right ventricle exceeds that in the left ventricle. Reported is the case of a child who remained cyanosed after surgical correction of pulmonary atresia despite right ventricular systolic pressure being lower than left ventricular pressure. Colour-flow Doppler showed a residual ventricular septal defect, with right-to-left shunting in diastole alone.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = ventricle
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/70. Pathologic finding of restenosis in stent-implemented right ventricle-pulmonary artery extracardiac conduit.

    We describe an excised specimen of a stent-implanted valved equine pericardial extracardiac conduit in the right heart. It appears from careful pathologic examination that the stent acted as a nidus for thrombus formation followed by thick neo-intimal development over the stent, which caused restenosis. Restenosis occurred despite anticoagulation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = ventricle
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/70. Intracerebral haematomas with agenesis of the internal carotid artery and tetralogy of fallot.

    We report a rare case with tetralogy of fallot (TOF) and agenesis of the internal carotid artery (ICA) who presented serious intracerebral haematomas. In the literature, this is the first documented case having these complications simultaneously. Extreme hypoxic insults followed by recovery were detected by O2 saturation monitor before two bleeds. Chronic brain hypoxia could make the vasculature weak, which was shown in the histological examination. A 2-year-old girl was transferred to us with a general convulsion due to intracerebral haematoma. She had been showing general cyanosis from birth due to TOF. Repeated intracerebral haemorrhages ended her life. Histological study showed dilated vascular channels in the subarachnoid space and necrotizing vasculature obstructed by fibrinous thrombi adjacent to the haematoma. fibrosis of the vessel wall with infiltration of macrophages suggested subacute or chronic lesions rather than acute necrosis due to the multiple haemorrhages. The intracerebral haematomas and agenesis of the ICA were observed as unilateral hemispheric vascular complications of TOF. Chronic brain hypoxia could play an important role in weakening the vessel wall and erythrocytosis caused obstructing thrombi. We speculate these factors generated the intracerebral haematomas.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.045500610598443
keywords = cerebral
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/70. Unexpected cardiac arrest in patients after surgical correction of tetralogy of fallot.

    Four of 220 patients without bifasicular block (complete right bundle branch block and left anterior hemiblock) or transient complete heart block immediately after surgery had an unexpected cardiac arrest one to 15 years after satisfactory surgical repair of tetralogy of fallot. The postoperative electrocardiograms (ECG) revealed complete right bundle branch block in two patients and no intraventricle conduction abnormality in two patients. Each of the four patients had premature ventricular contractions on previous postoperative ECG. The cardiac arrest occurred during normal activity in three patients and mild exercise in one. Following the cardiac arrest, three patients died and one patient survived. Eighteen months before the cardiac arrest, the survivor had a stress test which revealed multifocal premature ventricular contractions with short bursts of ventricular tachycardia after exercise. This ventricular arrhythmia was suppressed with quinidine therapy. Although complete heart block cannot be excluded in these four patients, we reasoned that the cardiac arrests were probably preceded by ventricular tachyarrhythmia. Because of this experience, we believe that any patient who has had intraventricular surgery should be evaluated for ventricular arrhythmia. If frequent premature ventricular contractions or serious ventricular arrhythmias are documented, we seriously consider antiarrhythmic therapy in an attempt to prevent ventricular tachyarrhythmias and sudden death.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = ventricle
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/70. Primitive ventricle with acquired subpulmonary stenosis.

    The course and natural history of two children aged 1 yr and 5 yr with primitive ventricle with outlet chamber and normally related great arteries are described. They initially presented as ventricular septal defect with increased pulmonary blood flow and subsequently developed 'cyanotic attacks', chronic cyanosis and diminished pulmonary flow by acquiring subpulmonary obstruction of the bulboventricular foramen. Both had successful surgical treatment utilizing their own normal pulmonary valves by connecting the right atrium to the right ventricular outflow, with a Dacron conduit in one, and in the other by detaching the pulmonary artery and valve from the rudimentary outflow chamber and anastomosing it directly to the right atrial appendage. Changing morphology and its effect on function are discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2.5
keywords = ventricle
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/70. A method of outflow tract reconstruction in tetralogy of fallot with anomalous anterior descending coronary artery.

    An anomalous anterior descending coronary artery that arises from the right coronary and crosses the right ventricle outflow tract can compromise corrective operations for tetralogy of fallot. The only safe method of outflow tract reconstruction reported until now is the use of a tubular graft from the right ventricle to the pulmonary artery. We report successful reconstruction of the outflow tract by placing a standard fabric path under the mobilized anomalous coronary artery. This technique should avoid the late complications of tubular conduits by preserving the natural posterior wall of the outflow tract for growth.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = ventricle
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/70. Rastelli type repair using Freestyle valved conduit for a 69-year-old woman with tetralogy of fallot.

    A 69-year-old woman visited our hospital with general fatigue and shortness of breath on effort as the chief complaints. She was diagnosed as having tetralogy of fallot, using cardiac ultrasonography. The cardiac catheterization findings showed that right venticular hypertension was at 114/5 mmHg, which was parallel to the left ventricular pressure, and a pressure gradient of about 100 mmHg was observed between the right ventricle and the pulmonary artery. Coronary artery angiography revealed that the left coronary artery was intact, but the right had an abnormal origin from the left valsalva sinus and was estimated at nearly equal to the single coronary. Therefore, we performed a Rastelli type operation with a valved conduit which we made using a composite Hemashield artificial graft (diameter 20 mm) and Freestyle valve (diameter 21 mm). The postoperative course was uneventful and she was discharged with hemodynamic conditions mostly normalized.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = ventricle
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/70. Transannular patching for tetralogy of fallot with an anomalous right coronary artery.

    A 7-year-old girl underwent transannular patching under the mobilized anomalous right coronary artery across the right ventricular outflow to treat progressing infundibular stenosis 6 years after total repair of the tetralogy of fallot. The procedure completely relieved recurrent stenosis. Simultaneous angiography of the coronary artery and right ventricle were useful in precisely evaluating coronary anatomy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = ventricle
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/70. Echocardiographic features of adult tetralogy of fallot with natural palliative correction by patent ductus arteriosus.

    A thirty-year-old man with the diagnosis of the tetralogy of fallot and patent ductus arteriosus was admitted to our hospital because of a syncope. He reported no previous symptoms. We diagnosed adult tetralogy of fallot, which included all four characteristic anomalies: ventricular septal defect, overriding aorta, pulmonary artery stenosis, and right ventricular hypertrophy. The associated persistent ductus arteriosus and the presence of compensatory arteriovenous communications produced a continuous flow load on the left ventricle, which resulted in moderate left ventricular hypertrophy, but without symptoms of pulmonary congestion or cardiac decompensation. Anatomic diagnosis and hemodynamic assessment were established by transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography, with incidental finding of a quadricuspid aortic valve. To the best of our knowledge, our case of the adult form of Fallot's tetralogy associated with both patent ductus arteriosus and quadricuspid aortic valve is the first one ever described. It is well known that patients with tetralogy of fallot who do not undergo operation in childhood have short survival, which depends predominantly on the degree of pulmonary artery stenosis and early development of collateral circulation to the lungs. Long-term persistence of natural aortopulmonary anastomosis with systemic collateral circulation to the lungs and remodeling of the heart, with better hemodynamic balance as well as the presence of mild pulmonary artery stenosis probably enhanced the survival of our patient.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = ventricle
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/70. Fatal cerebral embolus - a complication of left ventricular venting.

    A 3-year-old child died following a routine tetralogy of fallot repair. death was caused by a cerebral embolus. Injury to the left ventricle during left ventricular venting resulted in an apical myocardial infarct. The embolic source was a mural thrombus covering the area of infarction. A technique is described whereby left ventricular venting can be avoided during open-heart surgery in small patients.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.52527811699914
keywords = ventricle, cerebral
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Tetralogy of Fallot'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.