Cases reported "Thalamic Diseases"

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1/37. An unusual concomitant tremor and myoclonus after a contralateral infarct at thalamus and subthalamic nucleus.

    A 72-year-old woman experienced a sudden onset of spontaneous tremor and myoclonus of right extremities that completely subsided 24 hours after onset. neuroimaging study revealed an infarct at the left ventral portion of thalamus and subthalamic nucleus. Concomitant dyskinetic movement disorders after stroke are extremely rare and the mechanism is herein discussed.
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ranking = 1
keywords = movement
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2/37. Pseudochoreoathetosis in four patients with hypesthetic ataxic hemiparesis in a thalamic lesion.

    Thalamic lesions give rise to a variety of clinical syndromes including choreoathetotic movements and ataxic hemiparesis as well as sensory deficits. We describe four patients exhibiting pseudochoreoathetosis, hypesthesia, and ataxic hemiparesis in the limbs contralateral to a thalamic lesion. Three of the four patients showed the involuntary movements within 10 days of stroke onset; the remaining patient was not seen until 4 years later. Three had infarction and the other one hemorrhage in the posterior and lateral thalamus. All the patients had both cerebellar and sensory ataxia. These cases suggest that failure to convey proprioceptive information be the basic pathophysiology of pseudochoreoathetosis.
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ranking = 63.887611966521
keywords = involuntary movement, movement
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3/37. A combined pattern of movement disorders resulting from posterolateral thalamic lesions of a vascular nature: a syndrome with clinico-radiologic correlation.

    We report a series of seven patients in whom a combined pattern of complex movement disorders restricted to one upper extremity emerged as a result of posterolateral thalamic lesions of vascular origin. This disorder was mainly characterized by choreiform and dystonic movements associated with variable, rhythmic, alternating movements of low frequency (myorhythmia). All cases showed, on computed tomography scan and/or magnetic resonance imaging, focal lesions involving the posterolateral quadrant of the thalamus. review of similar cases reported with identical clinico-radiologic features allows us to conclude that it is possible to establish an accurate anatomoclinical correlation based on the clinical phenomenology, even before imaging studies are performed, in these cases. The opposite is not entirely possible, however, because lesions in the same quadrant of the thalamus are often associated with different patterns of abnormal movements or present without abnormal movements.
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ranking = 9
keywords = movement
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4/37. Selective loss of vergence control secondary to bilateral paramedian thalamic infarction.

    The supranuclear pathways for vergence eye movements are poorly understood. The authors report a 57-year-old patient who presented with selective loss of vergence control and dissociation of light and near reaction. MRI showed a symmetric paramedian thalamic infarction without midbrain lesion. The findings suggest that this syndrome is due to an interruption of supranuclear fibers to midbrain vergence neurons.
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ranking = 1
keywords = movement
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5/37. Unilateral pure thalamic asterixis: clinical, electromyographic, and topographic patterns.

    Eleven patients (nine with infarctions and two with primary hematomas) with isolated thalamic lesions and contralateral asterixis were examined using a standard electromyographic and neuroimaging protocol. Asterixis was a short-duration phenomenon associated with a hemiataxia hypesthesia syndrome in all patients. Electromechanical synchronization was constant for the two silent period types. The anatomic data strongly suggest that ventral lateral or lateral posterior thalamus are concerned in the pathophysiology of thalamic asterixis.
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ranking = 250.27992021029
keywords = asterixis
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6/37. Japanese encephalitis with movement disorder and atypical magnetic resonance imaging.

    With the advent of magnetic resonance imaging, brain lesions associated with Japanese encephalitis are increasingly being recognized and correlated with movement disorder. Bilateral haemorrhagic thalamic infarcts on MRI, suggested as a characteristic finding in Japanese encephalitis were conspicuous by their absence in this case report of Japanese encephalitis.
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ranking = 5
keywords = movement
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7/37. Rubral tremor after thalamic infarction in childhood.

    The occurrence of tremor after thalamic lesions is well known. Delayed rubral tremor secondary to bilateral thalamic infarction is a rare finding and has not been reported previously in childhood. We present two children with a combined resting-postural-kinetic tremor caused by bithalamic infarction. The first child was a male 14 months of age, and the second was a male 9 years of age. These children come from unrelated families. On hospital admission of the first patient, generalized seizures and routine electroencephalogram (EEG) findings with diffuse spike-wave discharges predominantly over the left frontal area were clinically observed, leading to the initial diagnosis of epilepsia partialis continua. However, clinical observation and video-EEG monitoring of the movements revealed nonepileptiform accompaniments, favoring the diagnosis of rubral tremor. In the second patient, EEG revealed no paroxysmal activity and was within normal limits for age. In both patients, cranial magnetic resonance imaging revealed ischemic lesions in thalami bilaterally but failed to reveal any mesencephalic lesion. These patients demonstrate that thalamic infarction can cause rubral tremor in childhood.
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ranking = 1
keywords = movement
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8/37. Paroxysmal dystonia with thalamic lesion in multiple sclerosis.

    Paroxysmal dystonia (PD) is a usually painful, unilateral dystonic posture, precipitated by voluntary movement, tactile stimulation, startling noise or hyperventilation. We describe two cases of paroxysmal dystonia in multiple sclerosis, both with a critically localized lesion in the thalamus, contralateral to the paroxysmal symptoms. Only one other case of paroxysmal dystonia with a demyelinated lesion of the thalamus has been reported previously.
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ranking = 1
keywords = movement
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9/37. Thalamic hand: a late onset sequela of stroke and its influence on physical function after rehabilitation: two cases report.

    Thalamic hemorrhage or infarction is one of the common causes of stroke. People who suffer from this type of cerebrovascular disease may develop thalamic syndrome which includes sensory disturbance, motor deficit and psychological problems. In this report, we introduce two cases of thalamic hemorrhage followed up for more than a half year after stroke. Delayed rigidity and choreodystonic type of involuntary movement over their paretic hand developed gradually. The metacarpophalangeal joints of the affected hand were kept flexed and the proximal and distal interphalangeal joints became extended. Thalamic hand is demonstrated in the appended pictures. Once the patient develops a thalamic hand, activities of daily living will be affected due to poor hand performance despite of high motor recovery stage. Early recognition and proper rehabilitation program for the patients with thalamic hand are emphasized.
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ranking = 62.887611966521
keywords = involuntary movement, movement
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10/37. Athetoid cerebral palsy with cysts in the putamen after hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy.

    Three cases of athetoid cerebral palsy after hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE) are reported. All three neonates had haemorrhagic lesions in the basal ganglia and thalami on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Prior cranial ultrasound had detected the lesions in only two cases. In all three children athetoid movements began within the first year of life. Follow up MRI scans showed bilateral symmetrical cystic lesions in the posterior putamen. Although haemorrhagic lesions within the basal ganglia are a common MRI finding in neonates with HIE, few of these babies develop athetoid cerebral palsy. We believe this to be the first report of discrete cystic lesions found in the basal ganglia of children with athetoid cerebral palsy.
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ranking = 1
keywords = movement
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