Cases reported "Thoracic Neoplasms"

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1/154. Prenatal sonographic features of embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma.

    We describe a case of fetal rhabdomyosarcoma detected during the third trimester of pregnancy by prenatal sonography. At 33 weeks' gestation, sonography performed because of suspected polyhydramnios showed a solid mass of 120 x 54 mm arising from the anterior wall of the fetal thoracic cage. Another mass within the left maxillary area which originated from the left orbital floor was also detected. In the abdomen, there were multiple round masses in and around the liver. As the previous scan at 28 weeks had appeared normal, the multiple masses which became visible and enlarged rapidly in different locations led us to believe that there was fetal cancer. The most likely diagnosis was rhabdomyosarcoma (which was later confirmed), because it is the most prevalent soft-tissue tumor in children and may develop within or outside muscle anywhere in the body and at any age. Two other reported cases which were detected by prenatal ultrasound examination are also discussed.
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ranking = 1
keywords = sarcoma
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2/154. Angiosarcoma of the chest wall.

    Angiosarcoma is a rare and highly malignant tumor of vascular origin. The causative factors include trauma, radiation, foreign bodies, thorium dioxide, and viral infections. We report a case of angiosarcoma occurring in a thoracotomy incision 17 years after operation for stage I lung cancer.
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ranking = 1
keywords = sarcoma
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3/154. rhabdomyosarcoma in a child with massive pleural effusion: cytological diagnosis from pleural fluid.

    We report on a case of embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma in an 11-yr-old boy investigated for mild chest pain after trauma. Chest radiography showed a massive right pleural effusion. Cytological analysis of the pleural fluid demonstrated the presence of malignant small undifferentiated cells. The rhabdomyoblastic nature of the cells was confirmed by positive immunostains of HHf35 actin, desmin, and skeletal muscle myosin; histological examination of a core biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of rhabdomyosarcoma. Computed tomography and gallium scan revealed the presence of an extensive anterior and lower chest wall mass involving the mediastinum, as well as retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy. Massive pleural effusion is a frequent presentation in malignant disease, but is rare in rhabdomyosarcoma. The immunochemical stain studies performed on cytological smears in this case proved to be very useful for making the definitive and accurate diagnosis. Diagn. Cytopathol. 1999;21:125-128.
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ranking = 1.1666666666667
keywords = sarcoma
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4/154. Thoracic lymphadenopathy in hiv patients: spectrum of disease and differential diagnosis.

    To evaluate the etiology and differential features of intrathoracic lymphadenopathy (LAD) in hiv patients, chest computed tomography (CT) records from an 18-month period were reviewed to identify all hiv-positive patients with intrathoracic LAD (nodal size > or = 1 cm). medical records were reviewed for the documentation of specific diseases causing LAD and the CD4 count at the time of imaging. Of 45 hiv-positive patients with LAD, 40 had specific diagnoses including 22 (55%) infections and 17 (43%) tumors; one patient had both (3%). Mycobacterial disease accounted for 78% of infections; five cases were secondary to bacterial pneumonia and sepsis. Of tumors, lymphoma (7 cases, 39%) was most common, followed by lung cancer, germ cell tumors, and Kaposi's sarcoma. Mean CD4 cell count in patients with tumors was much higher than in patients with infections (314 vs. 62, p < .01). patients with tumors were somewhat more likely than patients with infections to demonstrate axillary adenopathy (29 vs. 5%, p = .068). Cavitary disease was only observed in patients with infections (27%, p < .03). CT and clinical findings may help direct the differential diagnosis of LAD in AIDS, and promote expedient definitive diagnosis and therapy.
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ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = sarcoma
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5/154. Myxoid liposarcoma of the supraclavicular fossa.

    Liposarcomas generally originate most often in the extremities or retroperitoneum, less frequently in the head and neck, and rarely in the thorax. We describe a particularly rare presentation of myxoid liposarcoma originating in the supraclavicular fossa. The mass was resected and has not recurred. We searched our pathology database for other soft-tissue tumors of the supraclavicular fossa and found no other case of sarcoma originating in this site. In addition, we performed a literature review of thoracic and neck liposarcomas to identify similar cases and discuss their clinical course.
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ranking = 1.3333333333333
keywords = sarcoma
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6/154. Angiosarcoma of the chest wall.

    A 50-year-old man sustaining bilateral chest wall angiosarcomas at intervals of several months underwent lesion resection. Angiosarcoma is so rare that we found no case in the literature who had undergone bilateral chest wall surgery for such tumors. His second tumor was thought to be metastatic rather than primary. Despite the 2 surgeries, irradiation, and chemotherapy, however, his prognosis was grave, as in other reports on angiosarcoma.
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ranking = 1.1666666666667
keywords = sarcoma
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7/154. Chest wall implantation of a mediastinal liposarcoma after thoracoscopy.

    We report a case of mediastinal liposarcoma resected by thoracoscopy. Despite the precautionary measures, chest wall implantations occurred rapidly at the port's sites in the chest wall and led to death within 24 months. We conclude that thoracoscopy is not a good approach for resection of anterior mediastinal masses in view of their possible malignant character.
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ranking = 0.83333333333333
keywords = sarcoma
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8/154. Primary pulmonary osteogenic sarcoma.

    A 56-year-old man initially presented to his family physician with tingling in the fingertips of his left hand. A chest radiograph revealed a left upper lobe mass. Local resection found a soft tissue osteogenic sarcoma. This is a report of a rare case of primary pulmonary osteogenic sarcoma.
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ranking = 1
keywords = sarcoma
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9/154. Primary intrathoracic malignant fibrous histiocytoma and angiosarcoma.

    Primary intrathoracic malignant fibrous histiocytoma and angiosarcoma are rare sarcomas constituting less than 0.2% of lung cancers. The typical imaging appearance is a large, well-circumscribed, non-cavitating, non-calcified, peripheral lung mass without hilar or mediastinal lymphadenopathy. bronchoscopy and percutaneous needle aspiration are of limited value in differential diagnosis, and thoracotomy is warranted for definitive diagnosis.
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ranking = 1
keywords = sarcoma
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10/154. Metastatic adenocarcinoma rib presenting as chondrosarcoma.

    A case of chondrosarcoma rib which turned out to be a case of metastatic adenocarcinoma on histopathological examination is being presented.
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ranking = 0.83333333333333
keywords = sarcoma
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