Cases reported "Thoracic Neoplasms"

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1/135. Papillary endothelial hyperplasia presenting as a chest wall neoplasm.

    Soft tissue hematomas generally resolve but may persist and develop into slow-growing, organized masses. These chronic expanding hematomas are characterized by a pseudocapsule and a predominantly necrotic central cavity, with foci of newly formed capillaries. These have been called chronic expanding hematomas or Masson's papillary endothelial hyperplasia. These lesions can mimic vascular neoplasms and must be considered in the evaluation of expanding soft tissue vascular malformations.
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ranking = 1
keywords = neoplasm
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2/135. Prenatal sonographic features of embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma.

    We describe a case of fetal rhabdomyosarcoma detected during the third trimester of pregnancy by prenatal sonography. At 33 weeks' gestation, sonography performed because of suspected polyhydramnios showed a solid mass of 120 x 54 mm arising from the anterior wall of the fetal thoracic cage. Another mass within the left maxillary area which originated from the left orbital floor was also detected. In the abdomen, there were multiple round masses in and around the liver. As the previous scan at 28 weeks had appeared normal, the multiple masses which became visible and enlarged rapidly in different locations led us to believe that there was fetal cancer. The most likely diagnosis was rhabdomyosarcoma (which was later confirmed), because it is the most prevalent soft-tissue tumor in children and may develop within or outside muscle anywhere in the body and at any age. Two other reported cases which were detected by prenatal ultrasound examination are also discussed.
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ranking = 0.019452631354179
keywords = cancer
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3/135. Angiosarcoma of the chest wall.

    Angiosarcoma is a rare and highly malignant tumor of vascular origin. The causative factors include trauma, radiation, foreign bodies, thorium dioxide, and viral infections. We report a case of angiosarcoma occurring in a thoracotomy incision 17 years after operation for stage I lung cancer.
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ranking = 0.019452631354179
keywords = cancer
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4/135. Comparison of kilovoltage x-ray and electron beam dose distributions for radiotherapy of the sternum.

    The dose distributions for a patient with cancer involving the sternum were calculated for both a kilovoltage x-ray beam and a megavoltage electron beam. The minimum target dose and dose uniformity over the target volume were significantly better using electrons (90%-101%) than kilovoltage x-rays (68%-119%). The calculated lung dose and integral patient dose were also less for electrons than kilovoltage x-rays. For treating cancers of the sternum with radical intent, megavoltage electrons are recommended as the treatment mode of choice rather than kilovoltage x-rays.
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ranking = 0.038905262708359
keywords = cancer
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5/135. Primary posterior chest wall echinococcosis.

    Hydatid cyst is not mentioned among the chest wall tumours in areas not known to harbour echinococcosis. One of the uncommon sites for echinococcosis even in endemic countries is the chest wall. The striking resemblance between neoplasm and hydatid cysts forms a diagnostic dilemma and makes the correct diagnosis essential before surgery.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = neoplasm
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6/135. Desmoid tumor of the chest wall following chest surgery: report of a case.

    Desmoid tumors of the chest wall following chest surgery are a rare occurrence. A case of this disease is reported herein together with a review of the literature. A 74-year-old man, who had previously undergone a right lower lobectomy for squamous cell carcinoma of the lung, was referred to our hospital with an abnormal shadow on his chest X-ray. The tumor, located in the right lateral chest wall, was successfully resected by an aggressive, wide extirpation, and a final diagnosis of a desmoid tumor originating in the chest wall was made. When following up patients after surgery for lung cancer, the possibility of desmoid tumors developing in the incised chest wall should therefore be kept in mind.
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ranking = 0.019452631354179
keywords = cancer
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7/135. Chest wall recurrence of breast cancer detected by scintimammography.

    A case of chest wall recurrence of breast cancer detected by scintimammography is presented. A 63-year-old woman who had a right mastectomy for breast carcinoma 24 years earlier was evaluated for left axillary adenopathy. Although it was suspected that a second primary malignancy had developed in the left breast, results of mammography and magnetic resonance imaging of that breast were negative. Scintimammography performed with Tc-99m sestamibi confirmed a normal left breast but revealed a lesion in the right chest wall at the site of the previous mastectomy. This was surgically confirmed as recurrent breast carcinoma, which subsequently altered patient management.
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ranking = 0.097263156770896
keywords = cancer
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8/135. thoracic wall prosthesis prevents deep invasion by non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Chest wall invasion is found in 5% of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer. Treatment for localized non-small-cell lung cancer consists of surgical resection and/or radiotherapy. We report a patient with lung cancer who had a local relapse after a reconstruction of the thoracic wall with a soft-tissue patch. Chemotherapy was given before reresection of the local relapse. Postoperative radiation therapy was performed. Twenty-one months after treatment for recurrent disease, the patient remains in complete remission. The history of this patient shows that a soft-tissue patch may prevent local tumor invasion. A review of the literature is given.
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ranking = 0.13616841947926
keywords = cancer
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9/135. The cytomorphology of pleuropulmonary blastoma.

    Pleuropulmonary blastoma is a rare, primitive primary neoplasm of the thorax in young children. The tumor, which is often but not always associated with cystic lung lesions, may arise in pulmonary parenchyma, the mediastinum, and pleura. Histologically, it is characterized by a biphasic neoplastic population of undifferentiated-appearing small round cells and larger spindle-shaped cells. A proportion of these cancers may also manifest more specific mesenchymal differentiation. In contrast to the pulmonary blastoma of adults, a malignant epithelial component does not occur. We present herein the third known case of a fine needle aspiration biopsy of a pleuropulmonary blastoma in a 5-year-old girl. The smears were moderately cellular and included an admixture of the characteristic small ovoid blastemal elements and scattered spindled mesenchymal tumor cells.
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ranking = 0.21945263135418
keywords = neoplasm, cancer
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10/135. Thoracic lymphadenopathy in hiv patients: spectrum of disease and differential diagnosis.

    To evaluate the etiology and differential features of intrathoracic lymphadenopathy (LAD) in hiv patients, chest computed tomography (CT) records from an 18-month period were reviewed to identify all hiv-positive patients with intrathoracic LAD (nodal size > or = 1 cm). medical records were reviewed for the documentation of specific diseases causing LAD and the CD4 count at the time of imaging. Of 45 hiv-positive patients with LAD, 40 had specific diagnoses including 22 (55%) infections and 17 (43%) tumors; one patient had both (3%). Mycobacterial disease accounted for 78% of infections; five cases were secondary to bacterial pneumonia and sepsis. Of tumors, lymphoma (7 cases, 39%) was most common, followed by lung cancer, germ cell tumors, and Kaposi's sarcoma. Mean CD4 cell count in patients with tumors was much higher than in patients with infections (314 vs. 62, p < .01). patients with tumors were somewhat more likely than patients with infections to demonstrate axillary adenopathy (29 vs. 5%, p = .068). Cavitary disease was only observed in patients with infections (27%, p < .03). CT and clinical findings may help direct the differential diagnosis of LAD in AIDS, and promote expedient definitive diagnosis and therapy.
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ranking = 0.019452631354179
keywords = cancer
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