Cases reported "Thrombocytosis"

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1/6. thrombocytosis with sideroblastic erythropoiesis: a mixed myeloproliferative myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Some patients with haematological neoplasms have features which overlap between a myelodysplastic syndrome and a myeloproliferative disorder. Two such patients are reported, both having sideroblastic erythropoiesis and thrombocytosis and one sequentially developing features of atypical chronic myeloid leukaemia, idiopathic myelofibrosis and acute megakaryoblastic leukaemia. The prevalence of thrombocytosis among cases of refractory anaemia with ring sideroblasts may be as high as 15-20% and has implications for choice of therapy.
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ranking = 1
keywords = anaemia
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2/6. Extreme thrombocytosis as a sign of coeliac disease in the elderly: case report.

    Increase in the number of blood platelets to over 1,000,000/mm3 in elderly patients is generally considered secondary to a myeloproliferative or neoplastic disease. To report the case of an elderly woman hospitalized for extreme thrombocytosis associated with severe anaemia, who was found to be suffering from coeliac disease. The patient, aged 83 years, was hospitalized presenting with fatigue. Laboratory tests showed microcytic hypochromic anaemia (haemoglobin 4 g/dl) and extreme thrombocytosis (platelet count 1,400,000/mm3). physical examination was normal, with the exception of marked thinness. There was no evidence of macroscopic bleeding from the gastrointestinal or genitourinary tracts. She had never suffered from gastrointestinal problems and had no family history of gastroenterological diseases. Oesophagogastroduodenoscopy and histology of the gastric and duodenal mucosa evidenced atrophic gastritis and an adenomatous polyp. The duodenal mucosa showed total villous atrophy, suggesting the diagnosis of coeliac disease. Antiendomysial IgA and anti-transglutaminase IgA antibodies were also positive. colonoscopy was negative. An ultrasound examination of the abdomen was normal, and the spleen was within the normal range. A peripheral blood smear showed no alterations in erythrocyte morphology typical of hyposplenism due to coeliac disease. The platelet count decreased rapidly after blood transfusions, when both serum iron and ferritin levels were still below normal limits. Furthermore, we observed a significant inverse correlation between the platelet count and haemoglobin concentration (r = -0.94, P < 0.003). platelet count and red blood cell count normalized after 2 months of a gluten-free diet; the haemoglobin concentration was also normal at this time. After 1 year of following a gluten-free diet, the patient remained well and had no complaints. There were no gastrointestinal disturbances. All haematological parameters were within normal limits. Intestinal biopsies showed normal villi and crypts without inflammatory infiltration of the lamina propria. This case shows that the association of haematological signs--extreme thrombocytosis and severe anaemia--considered in an elderly patient to be typical of myeloproliferative disorders or neoplastic conditions can be due to coeliac disease; thus, coeliac disease must also be considered among the possible diagnoses.
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ranking = 3
keywords = anaemia
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3/6. Sideroblastic anaemia with reactive thrombocytosis versus myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative disease.

    The reported incidence of thrombocytosis among cases of refractory anaemia with ring sideroblasts (RARS) may be as high as 15%. We report four additional cases of this association, which appear to be hematologically heterogeneous. One patient clearly represents a case of RARS with reactive thrombocytosis. Two cases have features suggestive of the coincidental occurrence of essential thrombocythemia and RARS. The fourth case could be best classified as a subtype of myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative disease unclassifiable (MDS/MPD U). Only new biological or molecular markers will allow better differentiation between these disorders.
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ranking = 5
keywords = anaemia
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4/6. Mild thrombocytosis secondary to iron-deficiency anemia and stroke.

    A 45-year-old woman with mild thrombocytosis secondary to iron-deficiency anemia suffered from hemispheric infarction in absence of vascular, cardiac or coagulation pathologies. The modest raise of the platelets count seemed as the sole possible cause for the cerebral infarction. We wish to emphasize the inconstant benignity of mild non essential thrombocytosis at levels less than 1 million/cu.mm.
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ranking = 1927.0907918405
keywords = iron-deficiency
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5/6. Haematologic findings in patients with renal carcinoma.

    Haemoglobin concentration and leukocyte and platelet counts were studied in 122 patients with renal carcinoma, 104 of whom subsequently underwent nephrectomy. In 61 of the operable patients the tumour was located within the renal capsule (group I) and in the other 43 it had invaded the perinephric tissues (group II). Eleven of the group II patients also had distant metastases in one or two sites. Multiple distant metastases precluded renal surgery in 18 patients (group III). Normochromic anaemia (haemoglobin less than 120 micrograms/l) was found in 17% and leukocytosis (greater than 8 x 10(9)/l) in 25% of the group I patients. The corresponding frequencies for group III were 72 and 67%. Severe anaemia was found in patients with localized tumours as well as in patients with extensive metastases. thrombocytosis (400-800 x 10(9)/l) occurred in less than 20% of the patients in groups I and II, but in 42% in group III. thrombocytopenia (less than 200 x 10(9)/l), on the other hand, which was present in 31% of the group I patients, was less common in those with metastasizing tumours. Haematologic anomalies in renal carcinoma suggest either bone-marrow metastases of tumour-induced mechanisms such as production of erythropoietin or thrombopoietin and phagocytic and chemotactic effects of tumour cells or auto-immune processes. When uncorrected by nephrectomy in patients without signs of metastases, such haematologic findings suggest concomitant blood disorders.
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ranking = 2
keywords = anaemia
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6/6. Carotid artery thrombus associated with severe iron-deficiency anemia and thrombocytosis.

    BACKGROUND: Thrombus within the carotid artery usually occurs in vessels with severe atherosclerotic disease and may embolize to cause transient ischemic attacks and cerebral infarctions. The risk factors for carotid artery thrombus formation in the absence of atherosclerosis are not well characterized. A case series is presented that suggests an association of carotid artery thrombus with severe iron-deficiency anemia and thrombocytosis. CASE DESCRIPTIONS: We describe three women with severe iron-deficiency anemia and thrombocytosis secondary to menorrhagia who developed carotid artery thrombi. Thrombi were detected radiographically. The patients were treated with anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy. In two patients, follow-up neuroimaging 10 to 14 days later demonstrated resolution of the thrombus and no identifiable vascular disease. CONCLUSIONS: Severe iron-deficiency anemia with thrombocytosis may be a risk factor for carotid artery thrombus formation. Medical management with anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy is a reasonable approach for these patients while the thrombus resolves.
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ranking = 2697.9271085766
keywords = iron-deficiency
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