Cases reported "Thrombosis"

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11/355. Doppler features of occlusion of the internal thoracic artery due to preoperative branch embolization.

    A 61-year-old male was referred to the surgical ward by cardiologists because of a diagnosis of unstable angina with 3-vessel disease. On preoperative left internal thoracic arteriography, a large first intercostal branch was found at the proximal portion. Selective arterial embolization of the branch of the left internal thoracic artery (LITA) was carried out preoperatively. At 2 days after embolization, the Doppler peak flow velocity and diameter of the LITA were increased and enlarged compared with before the procedure. However, a large reverse wave following after the first systolic peak flow of the LITA was newly detected after embolization. Upon operation, the LITA was found to be occluded at the 2nd intercostal space due to thrombus formation. Therefore, the right internal thoracic artery was anastomosed to the left anterior descending artery and coronary reversed saphenous vein grafts were joined to segment 4PD of the right coronary artery. The postoperative course was uneventful. There has been no previous report of an LITA branch being embolized preoperatively. It was possible to diagnose the graft problem by detecting the altered Doppler wave form of the LITA.
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12/355. Acute clinical deterioration in a patient with end-stage dilated cardiomyopathy and left ventricular thrombus formation.

    The case of a 17-year-old male patient with severe end-stage dilated cardiomyopathy and a large thrombus formation within the cavum of the left ventricle is reported. After an acute thrombectomia combined with a partial left ventriculectomy (Batista procedure), the patient was successfully treated with an appropriate left ventricular assist device (LVAD) system using a centrifugal nonocclusive pump (Biomedicus, Medtronic, Anaheim, CA, U.S.A.). Mechanical support was removed on Day 9, and the patient was discharged from the hospital on Day 19. The effectiveness of emergency mechanical support in patients with very unfavorable prognoses is discussed.
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13/355. Fatal cerebroembolism from nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis in a trauma patient: case report and review.

    Nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis (NBTE) is a rare condition that may result in an unexpected and usually fatal cerebroembolism. It occurs in a variety of clinical situations, including malignancy, immune disorders, and sepsis, but it has rarely been reported after trauma. The formation of NBTE appears to require a hypercoagulable state and changes in valvular morphology, e.g., during a hyperdynamic state. patients with disseminated intravascular coagulation have a 21% incidence of NBTE. Although NBTE is usually found at autopsy, premorbid detection by echocardiography is currently possible and feasible. Untreated patients have a high incidence of embolic events, but anticoagulation with heparin may be life-saving. A lethal case of NBTE in a severely injured patient is reported here with the purpose of increasing awareness among medical personnel caring for trauma patients. Recommendations have been made for surveillance echocardiography in high-risk patients, e.g., critically ill patients with sepsis or disseminated intravascular coagulation.
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14/355. A case of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy in sinus rhythm associated with thrombus in the right atrium.

    We describe a patient with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARCV) in sinus rhythm associated with thrombus in the right atrium. The occurrence of a right heart thrombus in ARCV is extremely rare and, to our knowledge, has been previously reported only in the right ventricle. In our case, ARCV most probably led to right atrial spontaneous echo contrast, and later, right atrial thrombus formation by blood stasis caused by right ventricular systolic dysfunction. In conclusion, our case suggests that right atrial thrombus may occur in ARCV, even in sinus rhythm.
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15/355. Successful streptokinase lysis of a right-atrial thrombus in a heart-transplant recipient.

    This report describes a mobile right-atrial thrombus formation diagnosed by transthoracic echocardiography in a 22-year-old patient seven months after orthotopic heart transplantation. To prevent embolic complication, systemic streptokinase lysis was performed over 48 hours. Echocardiographic control examinations have shown that this therapy completely removed the thrombus.
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16/355. Novel mutation (E113X) of antithrombin iii gene (AT3) in a woman with gestational recurrent thrombosis.

    A 35-year-old Japanese woman with a low level (42-54%) of blood antithrombin (AT) III, experienced two induced abortions due to deep venous thrombosis at 8 weeks of gestation (GW) and cerebral thrombosis at 10 GW. The present pregnancy was successfully managed with intravenous administration of AT III (6,000-8,000 U/wk). Analysis of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) for exons 3A and 4 of the AT III gene (AT3) using her dna revealed extra expansion bands with altered migration. The dna sequencing demonstrated novel mutations in exon 3A of AT3: a G to T substitution at nucleotide position 5333 in codon GAG for Glu 113, causing a stop codon (E113X), and an A to T substitution at position 5338 in codon AAA for Lys 114, forming Asn (K114N). These novel mutations, especially E113X, in AT3 may be related to recurrent thrombosis in the pregnancy.
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17/355. Thrombus formation at the site of radiofrequency catheter ablation.

    A 55-year-old woman with a history of resected atrial myxoma with residual patched atrial septal defect (ASD) underwent a successful radiofrequency (RF) ablation of reentry atrial tachycardia. She presented with progressive dyspnea 5 days later. Transesophageal echocardiography revealed a 1-cm right atrial mass attached to the intraatrial septum at the ablation site. Repeat study after anticoagulation for 5 weeks showed complete resolution of the thrombus. Thrombus formation at the site of RF ablation is a potential complication that may require aggressive anticoagulation. patients with patched ASD might be at higher risk.
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18/355. Sleeve thrombus fibrosis causing neck pain.

    BACKGROUND: Central venous catheter occlusion due to thrombus formation is the most common cause for malfunction of long-term indwelling catheters. The exact pathology and pathogenesis of this common complication is misunderstood because of an array of terms being used interchangeably in the literature. This article identifies the pathogenesis and symptoms and gives suggestions for the treatment of central venous catheter-related thrombosis. methods: Our case report is of a girl who had a percutaneously placed left subclavian central venous line attached to her vascuport. After 9 months she developed severe pain over the catheter tubing on injection into the port. Surgical exploration of the catheter tubing in the infraclavicular region demonstrated that the pain was due to retrograde flow around the catheter within a sleeve thrombus. CONCLUSIONS: In this type of patient, all precautions should be taken to minimize the risk of thrombus formation, including considering the prophylactic use of anticoagulants.
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19/355. Tissue harmonic imaging: a new method for predicting left ventricular thrombus?

    We report a case of spontaneous echocardiographic contrast in the left ventricle visualized by transthoracic second harmonic imaging, but not by fundamental imaging, and subsequent thrombus formation.
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20/355. Extensive thrombus formation in the right ventricle due to a rare combination of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy and heterozygous prothrombin gene mutation G20210 A.

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy is a rare heart muscle disease characterized by right and often left ventricular myocardial atrophy and fibrofatty replacement. heart failure, arrhythmias and sudden death are characteristic complications. We observed a female in whom arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy was diagnosed due to presyncopes and dyspnea on exertion. A left ventricular thrombus was found echocardiographically, which disappeared with oral anticoagulation. Subsequently, however, extensive thrombus formation in the dilated akinetic right ventricle occurred which was resistant to combined treatment with heparin and oral anticoagulation. thrombophilia screening showed a mutant prothrombin 20210A allele which is an inherited coagulopathy associated with increased plasma levels of prothrombin and increased risks of mainly venous thrombosis. The patient developed endstage biventricular heart failure and underwent heart transplantation within 3 months after thrombus formation in the right ventricle was diagnosed. In the explanted heart, the thrombus in the right ventricle was impressively large and calcified. In patients with unusual thrombus formation in the heart, coagulopathy may be associated and should be excluded.
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