Cases reported "Tibial Fractures"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

11/28. [Primary Ilizarov ankle fusion for nonreconstructable tibial plafond fractures]

    OBJECTIVE: ankle arthrodesis in a plantigrade position. In high-energy open injuries with segmental bone loss: proximal tibial metaphyseal corticotomy with distal Ilizarov bone transport for compensation of leg length discrepancy. INDICATIONS: Posttraumatic loss of the tibial plafond, usually resulting from open fracture type IIIC. CONTRAINDICATIONS: Ipsilateral foot injuries impairing ambulation after fusion. Severe injury to the posterior tibial nerve with absent plantar sensation. Soft-tissue injury not manageable surgically. Inadequate patient compliance. Advanced age. Severe osteoporosis. Acute infection. SURGICAL TECHNIQUE: Standard technique: anteromedial longitudinal incision. Removal of remaining articular cartilage. Passing of Ilizarov wires through the distal fibula, talar neck and body. Placement of 5-mm half-pins through stab incisions, perpendicular to the medial face of the tibial shaft. A lateral to medial 1.8-mm Ilizarov wire in the proximal tibial metaphysis is optional. Callus distraction/Ilizarov bone transport: exposure through an anteromedial incision or transverse traumatic wound. Removal of small residual segment of tibial plafond blocking transport. Retain small vascularized bone fragments not blocking transport. For Ilizarov external fixation, two rings in the proximal tibial region. Drill osteoclasis of the tibial metaphysis 1 cm distal to the tibial tuberosity and complete with Ilizarov osteotome. Secure the Ilizarov threaded rods or clickers. Weight bearing as tolerated. Begin distraction 14 days after corticotomy at a rate of 0.5-1 mm per day depending on patient's age. After docking: Ilizarov ankle arthrodesis. RESULTS: Between January 1993 and September 1996, four patients (two men, two women) with severe, nonreconstructable fractures of the tibial plafond were treated. Callus distraction and Ilizarov bone transport in three patients. Age range 19-68 years (average age 45.7 years). Mean follow-up 6.6 years (4 years 9 months to 7 years 4 months). Average duration of the entire treatment in external fixation 54.4 days/cm for the three bone distraction patients. Mean transport 6 cm (4.5-8.5 cm). One patient required repeat ankle arthrodesis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = anteromedial
(Clic here for more details about this article)

12/28. Compartment syndrome after closed intramedullary nailing of the tibia: a canine model and report of two cases.

    Two patients developed an anterior tibial compartment syndrome after closed reamed intramedullary nailing of their fractured tibial shaft. Subsequently, a study was undertaken using a canine model to evaluate the risk of compartment syndrome after this operative procedure. A closed tibial fracture was created in 20 mongrel canines by applying a torsional load localized to the tibial shaft through a stress riser made with an intramedullary drill. Compartment pressures were measured in the canine anterolateral and deep posterior leg compartments. In 10 dogs, closed intramedullary nailing with reaming was performed while compartment pressures were measured. The remaining 10 dogs served as controls. Compartment pressures were monitored for 4 hours. In the experimental group, one dog attained and maintained a pressure greater than 50 mm Hg; a second dog maintained a pressure of 20 mm Hg during the postoperative monitoring period. In both of these cases, fasciotomy reduced the pressures to zero. The high tissue pressure readings were localized to the anterolateral muscle compartment. In the control group, no pressures higher than 8 mm Hg were recorded. Compartment syndrome is a potential complication of closed intramedullary nailing of the tibia, and the anterior muscle compartment appears to be the one most at risk. Therefore, perioperative tissue pressure monitoring is recommended.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2.5921491720511E-6
keywords = group
(Clic here for more details about this article)

13/28. Tibia nonunions treated by interlocked nailing: increased risk of infection after previous external fixation.

    Eighteen patients, mean age 36 years (range of 22-76 years), with tibia-shaft nonunions were treated with interlocked nailing. There were 12 nonunions originally treated with either cast, lag screws, plate, or Ender nails (nine closed, two open grade I and one grade II injury). The remaining six nonunions, all open fractures (five grade II and one grade III injury) initially received external fixation. After removal of the fixator, 72 days postinjury (range of 58-111 days), there was a delay of 218 days (range of 112-449 days) before the nailing procedure in those patients primarily treated with external fixation. All 12 nonunions not primarily treated with external fixation healed without complications after nailing within 17 weeks (range of 12-24 weeks). All six nonunions primarily treated with external fixation had temporary pin-tract infections, which healed after pin extraction. Two of the nonunions healed without any complication, whereas four developed intramedullary infection with the same bacteria as from the pin-tract site. Although the number of patients is small in this report, there is an apparently high incidence of intramedullary infection in the group originally treated with external fixation. The sequential procedure of external fixation followed by intramedullary nailing is, therefore, not recommended in the treatment of open tibia fractures.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.2960745860255E-6
keywords = group
(Clic here for more details about this article)

14/28. The 'occult' compartment syndrome.

    Two cases of compartment syndromes after tibial fractures are presented in patients who had no sensation in the involved compartments. The absence of any clinical symptoms in these patients emphasizes the need for routine monitoring of intra-compartmental pressure in this select group of patients.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.2960745860255E-6
keywords = group
(Clic here for more details about this article)

15/28. The natural history and treatment of delayed union stress fractures of the anterior cortex of the tibia.

    This study presents eight patients with stress fracture of the anterolateral cortex of the midshaft of the tibia. All of the patients, ranging in age from 14 to 23 years, were competitive basketball players who experienced pain while running or jumping for an average of 4.4 months before the diagnosis was made. Eight patients were treated with rest and/or pulsing electromagnetic field therapy. Although one of the patients required bone grafting procedure, all eight of these patients showed complete healing and were able to return to full activity after an average of 8.7 months of treatment. They have remained asymptomatic for an average of 14.7 months. The overall time from initial symptoms to return to competition averaged 12.5 months in this group of athletes. The results presented in this paper suggest that rest and pulsing electromagnetic field therapy may result in healing in some patients with delayed union stress fractures of the anterolateral cortex of the midshaft of the tibia. Although this injury is associated with a prolonged healing period, seven of eight patients with adequate followup in our study were able to return to competition without complications following treatment. One patient was asymptomatic for 33 months before experiencing a reinjury. In conclusion, we feel that diagnosis of stress fracture should be primary consideration in basketball players presenting with a prolonged history of pain on the anterolateral aspect of the midthird of the tibia. Once the diagnosis is made we recommend initial treatment consist of rest and external electrical stimulation for a minimum time of 3 to 6 months prior to considering surgical intervention.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.2960745860255E-6
keywords = group
(Clic here for more details about this article)

16/28. Surgical stabilization of pathological neoplastic fractures.

    The most important factor to consider in deciding between treatment options in the management of metastatic bone disease is the level of the patient's dysfunction and pain. Severe dysfunction or pain demands a treatment that predictably leads to a quick resumption of the painless activities of daily living. A treatment that predictably will restore function in months may seem reasonable in patients with a normal remaining life span, but is untenable if those months represent a high percentage of remaining life span, as they do in metastatic disease afflicted patients. The treating physician needs also to understand the basis for the patient's dysfunction. A destroyed joint will not return to painless function even if the metastasis responsible is totally eliminated. A bone that has lost its structural integrity, even though not grossly fractured, will not support weight bearing for months even if the metastasis is eliminated. Control of the metastatic tumor does not always equate with return to function. Treatment options in the management of metastatic bone disease are not mutually exclusive. In many patients treatment options are combined. Surgical stabilization may best return the patient's function while he is being treated postoperatively with radiotherapy or chemotherapy for good neoplasm control. Neoplasm control should not be such an overriding concern that function is not addressed. Function can almost always be returned to the patient, but neoplasm "cure" is rarely achieved in this group of patients. It is a reasonable goal to avoid allowing bone metastasis to progress to pathological fracture. Routine periodic examinations and bone scans should commonly alert the treating physician to the presence of metastatic bone disease well before fracture occurs. Pathological fracture narrows the range of treatment options, mitigates against full functional restoration, demands a rehabilitation hiatus, and acutely frightens the patient who does not have time to participate fully in treatment decisions. An impending pathological fracture can be treated with surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, or hormonal manipulation. The options are basically operative or nonoperative. Lesions that predictably will fracture short term, involve joints, or will cause catastrophic consequences if fracture occurs should be strongly considered for surgical stabilization. Other factors to consider are the location of the metastasis, the primary tumor, and the expected response to nonoperative therapy. The patient becomes a surgical candidate for the above reasons and not because of any estimated life span.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.2960745860255E-6
keywords = group
(Clic here for more details about this article)

17/28. Treatment of tibial defect with vascularized osteocutaneous pedicled transfer of fibula.

    Free osteocutaneous fibular flap transfer has been used for long bone and soft tissue defects in both the lower and upper extremity. Since July, 1984, two cases of tibial defect, with severe scar formation on the anteromedial aspect, have been treated. An ipsilateral, vascularized, osteocutaneous, pedicled flap of the fibula was used to bridge the bony defect and to resurface the wound, after scar excision and bony debridement. The peroneal vessels were severed, leaving one side intact. The entire fibular flap was shifted anteromedially through a tunnel between the anterior and posterior tibialis. In addition to screw fixation of both ends of the transfer, an external fixator was used for three months. This technique has the advantages of obviating the need for vessel anastomoses and of completing the whole procedure on a single leg.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = anteromedial
(Clic here for more details about this article)

18/28. Management of open tibial fractures.

    A prospective study was undertaken to accurately classify open tibial fractures and to evaluate the benefit of muscle flaps in the management of these injuries. From 191 open tibial fractures, 59 type III and 14 type IV open fractures were identified and managed prospectively. Fractures managed with open-wound techniques have a much higher complication rate than those closed with flaps. Results with flap coverage are affected by the biologic phase of the wound. The best results are seen in the acute flap coverage group and are thought to be secondary to removal of devitalized tissue with provision of a vascularized soft-tissue envelope prior to wound colonization. Flap coverage of the colonized subacute wound is subject to invasive infection with additional tissue loss. The subacute wound should be managed with open-wound technique until the parameters of a chronic localized wound are established, at which time flap coverage is again indicated. Microvascular free flaps are the preferred cover for type IV wounds because the local tissues are too ischemic and devitalized for transfer. With meticulous wound care and adherence to the enumerated surgical procedures, limb salvage may be achieved in most injuries.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.2960745860255E-6
keywords = group
(Clic here for more details about this article)

19/28. lower extremity salvage and reconstruction by free-tissue transfer. Analysis of results.

    The application of soft tissue or bone free-tissue transfers to lower extremity salvage or reconstruction was assessed in a review of 86 consecutive procedures done during a 36-month period. This group included 65 cases of free skin or muscle flap transfer and 21 cases of free vascularized bone transfer. In terms of tissue viability, the success rate was 80.2% (78.5% for the soft tissue group and 85.7% for the bone group). With due consideration of indications, the incidence of secondary sepsis in patients with chronic osteomyelitis, and other potential complications, free-tissue transfers are valuable for salvage and reconstructive surgery of the lower extremity.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3.8882237580766E-6
keywords = group
(Clic here for more details about this article)

20/28. Wound colonization by Ewingella americana.

    Ewingella americana was recovered from a wound on the left leg of a 46-year-old male after a compound fracture of the tibia and fibula. Compared with the reported characteristics of 44 American strains, this strain was shown to belong to biogroup 1. The isolation of this bacterium in south africa confirms its wide geographical distribution in clinical specimens. Colonization was not associated with clinical deterioration.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.2960745860255E-6
keywords = group
(Clic here for more details about this article)
<- Previous || Next ->


Leave a message about 'Tibial Fractures'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.