Cases reported "Tibial Neuropathy"

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1/5. Posterior tibial neuropathy by a Baker's cyst: case report.

    Baker's cysts are rare cause of peripheral nerve entrapment and only a few cases of tibial nerve entrapment resulting from the popliteal cyst in the calf muscle have been reported in the literature. We present a case of rheumatoid arthritis complicated by a Baker's cyst with a tibial nerve entrapment. It is important to diagnose a Baker's cyst early and to differentiate it from thrombophlebitis, a popliteal aneurysm, tumor or muscle tear to effect optimal therapy and to obviate a potential neuropathy. Prompt recognition of these cases may save the patients unnecessary procedures and delay in treatment.
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ranking = 1
keywords = neuropathy, peripheral nerve, peripheral
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2/5. Two cases of tibial nerve compression caused by uncommon popliteal cysts.

    We report 2 cases of a popliteal mass of very unusual origin that induced compression neuropathy. The signs and symptoms could have been mistaken for those of a common Baker's cyst. Several recent studies have shown that the cause of Baker's cyst formation should be sought within the joint because of a communication between the gastrocnemio-semimembranosus bursa and the joint cavity. These 2 cysts had no communication with the articular joint, thus suggesting that the surgeon perform an open exploration of the popliteal fossa in the search for other cystic formations with origins and features different from Baker's cysts.
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ranking = 0.18486851546924
keywords = neuropathy
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3/5. Heterotopic ossification of peripheral nerve ("neuritis ossificans"): report of two cases.

    OBJECTIVE AND IMPORTANCE: Heterotopic ossification ("neuritis ossificans") is among the least frequently encountered reactive lesions in peripheral nerves. Only two cases have been described previously, one in the median nerve of a 34-year-old man, and the other in the ulnar nerve of an adult woman. The architecture of this lesion is distinctly zonal. Consisting of a central fibroblastic core, an intervening zone of osteoid production, and a peripheral layer of ossification, the pattern is remarkably similar to that of myositis ossificans. This similarity and the occurrence of the process in superficial nerves have led to speculation that trauma plays a role in its pathogenesis; this hypothesis remains unproved. We describe two additional cases of neuritis ossificans. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: One patient, a 41-year-old man, experienced pain and numbness in the left leg for several months but had no history of local trauma. A mass was detected in the saphenous nerve. The second patient, a 16-year-old boy, noted subacute onset of pain in the popliteal fossa and decreased sensation in the distribution of the lateral sural cutaneous nerve. A mass was found within the tibial nerve at the knee level. INTERVENTION: In each patient, resection of the mass required sacrifice of a segment of the nerve. CONCLUSION: In each patient, the mass was composed of fibrovascular tissue with osteoid and bone deposition arranged in a zonal pattern. The ossifying process was intraneural but encased rather than directly involving nerve fascicles. These exceptionally intact examples of neuritis ossificans underscore its resemblance to myositis ossificans. Nerve-sparing resection of such masses is not always possible.
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ranking = 0.38378964858302
keywords = peripheral nerve, peripheral
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4/5. Bed footboard peroneal and tibial neuropathy. A further unusual type of Saturday night palsy.

    An uncommon cause of bilateral tibial and peroneal compression neuropathy is reported. After taking alcohol and drugs, a young heroin-addicted man lay unconscious overnight in supine position, with both legs crossing the wooden board at the end of the bed, the posterior aspect of the flexed knees pressing against its edge. The following day, he had weakness of foot flexion and extension and a sensory loss consistent with a bilateral tibial and peroneal neuropathy. Symptoms resolved rapidly in the left side; in the right side, a conduction block was still demonstrable 3 weeks later.
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ranking = 1.1092110928154
keywords = neuropathy
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5/5. An abnormal mRNA produced by a novel PMP22 splice site mutation associated with HNPP.

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autosomal dominant, demyelinating neuropathy. Point mutations in the PMP22 gene are a rare cause of HNPP. A novel PMP22 splice site mutation (c.179 1 G-->C) is reported in an HNPP family. By reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction experiments, this mutation was shown to cause the synthesis of an abnormal mRNA in which a premature stop codon probably produces a truncated non-functional protein.
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ranking = 0.36973703093848
keywords = neuropathy
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