Cases reported "Tick Infestations"

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1/21. tick paralysis: 33 human cases in washington State, 1946-1996.

    tick paralysis is a preventable cause of illness and death that, when diagnosed promptly, requires simple, low-cost intervention (tick removal). We reviewed information on cases of tick paralysis that were reported to the washington State Department of health (Seattle) during 1946-1996. Thirty-three cases of tick paralysis were identified, including 2 in children who died. Most of the patients were female (76%), and most cases (82%) occurred in children aged <8 years. Nearly all cases with information on site of probable exposure indicated exposure east of the Cascade Mountains. Onset of illness occurred from March 14 to June 22. Of the 28 patients for whom information regarding hospitalization was available, 54% were hospitalized. dermacentor andersoni was consistently identified when information on the tick species was reported. This large series of cases of tick paralysis demonstrates the predictable epidemiology of this disease. Improving health care provider awareness of tick paralysis could help limit morbidity and mortality due to this disease.
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2/21. Presumptive babesia ovis infection in a spanish ibex (Capra pyrenaica).

    On December 29 1995, a 13-year old, male Spanish ibex was easily captured by hand, with depression, weakness and severe tick infestation, mainly in the periocular and auricular regions. Blood and serum samples were collected and haematological analysis and serum iron levels were determined. Red blood cell count, haematocrit, haemoglobin concentration and mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC) were decreased and mean corpuscular volume (MCV) increased (macrocytic-hypochromic anemia). serum iron and transferrin saturation were decreased and total and unbound iron-binding capacity were increased. Piroplasms were observed within parasitized erythrocytes and presumptively identified as babesia spp. ticks were identified exclusively as Ripicephalus bursa. The animal was treated with imidocarb but died after 15 days of capture. Histopathological examination revealed congestion of pulmonary capillaries and spleen, glomerulonephritis, hemoglobinuric nephrosis and generalized hemosiderosis. An indirect fluorescent antibody test was performed using a babesia ovis isolate of ovine origin as antigen and the animal was positive with a titre of 1:640.
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3/21. Amblyomma testudinarium tick bite: one case of engorged adult and a case of extraordinary number of larval tick infestation.

    This paper reports two recent cases of tick bite due to Amblyomma testudinarium. The first case was an 86-year-old farmer infested with a fully engorged adult tick attached on his inguinal region. The second case was a 57-year-old male infested with an extraordinarily large number of larval ticks (> 100 larvae). The ticks were identified as A. testudinarium based on morphological characteristics. To our knowledge, the latter case is the eleventh case of larval tick bites among all tick species and the fourth case with larval A. testudinarium in japan.
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4/21. Introduction of the exotic tick Amblyomma hebraeum into florida on a human host.

    A resident of florida returned from a short visit to southern africa to find a male Amblyomma hebraeum tick attached to the skin behind her knee. Amblyomma hebraeum is a major vector of 2 pathogens that cause important diseases in southern africa, heartwater of ruminants and African tick-bite fever of humans. The tick was tested by polymerase chain reaction assay for evidence of infection with Cowdria ruminantium and rickettsia africae (the causative agents of heart-water and African tick-bite fever, respectively) and was found to be negative for both agents. This is the second record of the exotic tick, A. hebraeum, being introduced into the united states on a human host.
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5/21. Two human cases of tick bite caused by ixodes nipponensis.

    We report two human cases of tick bite. A 63-year-old male had a pruritic pea-sized brownish nodule on the left popliteal area. Another 41-year-old male had an asymptomatic bean-sized black nodule in the pubic area. The ticks were identified as ixodes nipponensis, which are the 18th and the 19th cases in korea.
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6/21. Anaphylactic shock to argas reflexus bite.

    anaphylaxis is a severe, life-threatening allergic reaction, affecting both children and adults. The occurrence of anaphylaxis is not as rare as generally believed (1.21% to 15.04% of the US population). Often the cause of this reaction remain unknown, mainly due to the difficulty in defining the outbreaking causes. Herein, we describe an interesting case of a patient, who developed an anaphylactic reaction after the bite of a pigeon tick. During the last 2 years, in wintertime, the patient often came to the emergency room for general rash and swelling, hypotension and tachycardia preceded by itching and general distress. Notably, the symptoms manifested themselves as night fell. In two particular occasions the patient reached the hospital in a state of shock. After another episode of general swelling, the patient was invited to examine her domestic environment. She brought us some parasites, collected at home, particularly on the bed. A morphological examination by entomologists proved these parasites to belong to argas reflexus (Arg.r.), one of the 31 species of soft ticks. The presence of specific IgE to a protein secreted by the Arg.r. salivary glands was in favour of immediate-type systemic reaction, as supposed by the clinical history.
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7/21. rhipicephalus sanguineus (acari: ixodidae), the brown dog tick, parasitizing humans in brazil.

    The objective of this paper is to describe four cases of human parasitism by rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latrielle) in brazil. During an investigation regarding the species of ectoparasites of domestic dogs from the metropolitan region of Recife, Pernambuco state, four dog owners were found to be parasitized by ticks. The ticks were collected from these individuals and their dogs. All the ticks were identified as rhipicephalus sanguineus . These are, to our knowledge, the first four cases of human parasitism by this tick species in brazil. The possible implications of this finding are discussed here.
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8/21. A case of histologically diagnosed tick infestation on the scalp of a Korean child.

    A scalp mass surgically excised from a 4-year-old Korean boy was identified as a tick through histological observations. In sections of the mass, characteristic features of a tick, including its gross contour, cuticular structures, well developed musculature and salivary glands, and the capitulum, were discovered. In particular, the capitulum is anteriorly protruded, which strongly suggests that the specimen be a hard tick of family ixodidae. However, the present histological features were not enough to determine the genus and species of the tick, because information on sectional morphologies of different tick species is unavailable. This is a rare case of tick infestation on the scalp diagnosed in histological sections.
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9/21. Tick inoculation in an eyelid region: report on five cases with one complication of the orbital myositis associated with Lyme borreliosis.

    PURPOSE: To determine the frequency and dependence of Lyme borreliosis after tick infestation in the eyelid region. MATERIAL AND methods: Five patients after tick inoculation were investigated by immunofluorescence assays for IgM and IgG system). Ophthalmologic evaluation of myositis was supported with MRI, laboratory, and internal clinical investigations. RESULTS: Four children showed negative Borrelia serology after a bite from a tick. In one case the left abducens nerve palsy was found, which was diagnosed in MRI as a thickened left lateral rectus muscle. The diagnosis of myositis with positive borrelia burgdorferi serology was consistent with Lyme borreliosis. Other laboratory examinations were negative. The symptoms were reduced after treatment with ceftriaxon. CONCLUSIONS: Lyme borreliosis was found in one in five patients after tick infestation in the eyelid region. antibiotic prophylaxis against Lyme borreliosis with ampicillin is recommended for children after a tick bite.
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10/21. Parasitization of humans in west virginia by ixodes cookei (acari: ixodidae), a potential vector of Lyme borreliosis.

    In 32 collections, two larvae, 33 nymphs, and one adult female ixodes cookei Packard were collected from humans in west virginia from August 1987 to May 1990. Most were attached. The ticks were found in 14 counties and were the most abundant ixodes found biting humans. One nymphal I. cookei was removed from the left axilla of a 39-yr-old woman who lives and works in Monongalia and Marion counties, W. Va. The bite was the center of an expanding erythematous lesion reaching 4 cm in diameter, clearing centrally, and typical of erythema migrans. This association and the near absence of ixodes dammini Spielman, Clifford, Piesman & Corwin from the state suggests the possibility that I. cookei may be an important vector of Lyme borreliosis in west virginia. In five separate collections, five nymphal ixodes dentatus Marx were removed from humans in four counties, implicating this species as a potential minor vector of Lyme borreliosis in west virginia.
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