Cases reported "Tics"

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11/34. Gilles de la tourette syndrome in a child with congenital deafness.

    We present the case of a 10-year-old boy, Sam, with congenital deafness and Gilles de la tourette syndrome (GTS). GTS is characterised by multiple motor tics and one or more vocal tics that wax and wane. Due to his deafness Sam never developed vocal language but instead used sign language from the age of four. His tic disorder rapidly accelerated from the age of seven over a six-month period and soon sign language was incorporated into tics as complex "vocal" tics. Bursting out "words" in sign language would also occur in front of people unfamiliar with sign language and often with an obscene content although this was not evident to someone not trained in sign language. To our knowledge this is the first reported case of a congenital deaf child with GTS. The case presented here supports previously published work that the intentional share of the tics in GTS is very small. This case also questions former theories on which regions and circuits of the brain are involved in GTS.
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ranking = 1
keywords = tic, tic disorder, vocal tic, vocal, motor
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12/34. Myelopathy caused by tics in an adolescent, associated with T2 signal intensity changes of the spinal cord.

    COURSE: A 15-year-old boy who had suffered motor tics since age 9 developed progressive cervical myelopathy involving both his hands and his lower extremities. T2-weighted MRI revealed mild canal stenosis and increased signal intensity in the cervical spinal cord beginning at the C-4 level and continuing upward to the medulla oblongata. TREATMENT: After C-3 to C-7 laminoplasty, the patient's clinical symptoms improved. DISCUSSION: It is possible that movement disorders such as tics may contribute to the development of cervical myelopathy owing to the effects of involuntary movements on the neck. Such an intensity change on a T2-weighted image has never been reported in an adolescent tic disorder. Despite such changes, surgical treatment may bring about clinical improvement.
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ranking = 1.160560522522
keywords = tic, tic disorder, motor
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13/34. Assessment and treatment of vocal tics associated with Tourette's syndrome.

    A functional analysis suggested that a young man's vocal tics were maintained by automatic reinforcement. A preference assessment was conducted to identify stimuli that effectively competed with the occurrence of vocal tics. When used as components of a reinforcement-based intervention, however, these stimuli were ineffective at reducing the occurrence of vocal tics. Observations conducted in a naturalistic context led to the hypothesis that variations in tics were associated with body positioning. Thus, an additional analysis was conducted to determine if vocal tics occurred less when the participant was lying down versus when he was seated upright. Results suggested that a combination of procedures might be useful in developing idiosyncratic interventions for automatically reinforced problem behavior, such as vocal tics.
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ranking = 2.4829702814464
keywords = tic, vocal tic, vocal
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14/34. Simple phonic tic in multiple sclerosis.

    movement disorders occurring in association with multiple sclerosis (MS) are rare. Among them paroxysmal dystonia is the most common, although chorea, ballism, palatal myoclonia, spasmodic torticollis, writer's cramp and generalized dystonia have been reported. We describe a 34-year old woman with MS who developed simple phonic tic characterized by throat-clearing sounds. magnetic resonance imaging showed demyelinating lesions involving the thalamus and basal ganglia. This is the first report of tic disorder occurring as a manifestation of MS.
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ranking = 1.3242298969942
keywords = tic, tic disorder
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15/34. Epigenetic abnormalities associated with a chromosome 18(q21-q22) inversion and a Gilles de la tourette syndrome phenotype.

    Gilles de la tourette syndrome (GTS) is a potentially debilitating neuropsychiatric disorder defined by the presence of both vocal and motor tics. Despite evidence that this and a related phenotypic spectrum, including chronic tics (CT) and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD), are genetically mediated, no gene involved in disease etiology has been identified. Chromosomal abnormalities have long been proposed to play a causative role in isolated cases of GTS spectrum phenomena, but confirmation of this hypothesis has yet to be forthcoming. We describe an i(18q21.1-q22.2) inversion in a patient with CT and OCD. We have fine mapped the telomeric aspect of the rearrangement to within 1 Mb of a previously reported 18q22 breakpoint that cosegregated in a family with GTS and related phenotypes. A comprehensive characterization of this genomic interval led to the identification of two transcripts, neither of which was found to be structurally disrupted. Analysis of the epigenetic characteristics of the region demonstrated a significant increase in replication asynchrony in the patient compared to controls, with the inverted chromosome showing delayed replication timing across at least a 500-kb interval. These findings are consistent with long-range functional dysregulation of one or more genes in the region. Our data support a link between chromosomal aberrations and epigenetic mechanisms in GTS and suggest that the study of the functional consequences of balanced chromosomal rearrangements is warranted in patients with phenotypes of interest, irrespective of the findings regarding structurally disrupted transcripts.
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ranking = 1.6366968915908
keywords = tic, vocal, motor
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16/34. Tourette's syndrome following temporal lobectomy for seizure control.

    Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome (TS) is a neurobehavioral disorder characterized by multiple motor and vocal tics, occurring longer than a year and causing marked distress along with social and occupational impairments in level of functioning. It can be accompanied by obsessive-compulsive behavior and attention deficit disorder. This report discusses the case of a young woman with a simple motor tic disorder and intractable seizures who, after right temporal lobectomy for medically intractable epilepsy, developed TS with complex motor and vocal tics, severe obsessive-compulsive disorder, and paranoia. This neurobehavioral complication has not to our knowledge been previously reported after epilepsy surgery.
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ranking = 0.5120894571838
keywords = tic, tic disorder, vocal tic, vocal, motor
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17/34. Familial hypothalamic digoxin deficiency syndrome.

    The case report of a family with coexistence of hypotension, recurrent respiratory infection, motor tics, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), major depressive disorder, early onset osteoporosis, low body mass index, bulimia nervosa, and healthy aging with longevity is described. The family members had hyposexual behavior and less tendency toward spirituality. They did not have insomnia, but they did display tendency toward increased somnolence. No addictive behavior was observed. The family demonstrated a high level of bonding and affectionate behavior, and they were less creative, with an average intelligence quotient (IQ). There was a total absence of vascular thrombosis, systemic neoplasms and neuronal degeneration in the indexed family. All members of the indexed family were left hemispheric dominant. The levels of serum digoxin, HMG-CoA reductase activity, and dolichol were found to be decreased in the members of the indexed family, with a corresponding increase in red blood cell (RBC) Na( )-K ATPase activity, serum ubiquinone and magnesium levels. There was increase in tyrosine catabolites and a reduction in tryptophan catabolites in the serum. The total and individual glycosaminoglycan fractions, carbohydrate residues of glycoproteins, activity of glycosaminoglycans (GAG) degrading enzymes, and glycohydrolases were decreased in the serum. The concentration of RBC membrane total GAG and carbohydrate residues of glycoproteins increased, while the cholesterol: phospholipid ratio of the membrane decreased. The activity of free radical scavenging enzymes were increased, while the concentration of free radicals decreased significantly. The same biochemical patterns were observed in left hemispheric dominance as opposed to right hemispheric dominance. The significance of these findings in the pathogenesis of these disorders is discussed.
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ranking = 0.16366943429612
keywords = tic, motor
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18/34. Transient tic disorder following carbon monoxide poisoning.

    We report a 12-year-old male patient who developed transient motor and vocal tics twelve days after carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning. Cranial magnetic resonance image (MRI) of the patient showed bilateral symmetric hyperintensity in the caudate nucleus and putamen. Tic disorder was successfully treated with haloperidol. Thirty-three months after CO poisoning, the patient was asymptomatic and MRI revealed atrophy in caudate nucleus and putamen. The mechanism of tic disorder in CO intoxication is discussed.
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ranking = 1.3868318207778
keywords = tic, tic disorder, vocal tic, vocal, motor
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19/34. Psychogenic tics: diagnostic value of the placebo test.

    Motor tics are characterized by abrupt onset of brief, unsustained focal movements that are usually preceded by a premonitory sensation and are suppressible. Psychogenic tics (pseudotics) are rarely described. It may not be easy to distinguish organic from functional tics because they can coexist. Using a case illustration, the value of a "staged" placebo test in aiding the diagnosis of psychogenic tics is described. In addition, a concise summary of the clinical phenomenology of tics and the diagnosis and management of psychogenic movement disorders is provided.
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ranking = 2.2913716613779
keywords = tic
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20/34. The emergence of tics during escitalopram and sertraline treatment.

    The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) have well-established antidepressant activity and have also demonstrated efficacy in a number of anxiety disorders, including panic disorder. The SSRIs, escitalopram and sertraline, are well-tolerated and movement disorders are rarely associated with their use. We present a case of the emergence of tics associated with escitalopram and sertraline treatment, which might be due to an imbalance in the dopaminergic neurotransmitter system.
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ranking = 0.81834702192066
keywords = tic
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