Cases reported "Tinea"

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1/32. Acute infection with trichophyton rubrum associated with flares of atopic dermatitis.

    trichophyton rubrum has been implicated as a potential trigger in flares of atopic dermatitis. We describe a patient with atopic dermatitis who presented with a history of multiple flares and concurrent acute tinea pedis and onychomycosis. Symptoms of atopic dermatitis and culture-positive acute infection with T. rubrum resolved during each flare using systemic antifungals. Flares of atopic dermatitis may be triggered by acute T. rubrum infections. Antifungal therapy should be considered in these patients.
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2/32. Microbiological and molecular diagnosis of deep localized cutaneous infection with trichophyton mentagrophytes.

    We describe a healthy young woman with a localized deep dermal infection on the right side of the chest wall. It was caused by the dermatophyte trichophyton mentagrophytes, and resolved after two pulses of oral itraconazole 200 mg twice daily for 1 week. As cultural and microscopic features did not enable a precise identification of the fungus, molecular investigation was undertaken. Patterns of HaeIII restriction digests of genomic dna from the culture matched those from Arthroderma incurvata and A. benhamiae, which is the teleomorph of T. mentagrophytes var. mentagrophytes.
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3/32. trichophyton tonsurans tinea capitis and tinea corporis: treatment and follow-up of four affected family members.

    We report a Caucasian family of two veterinary practitioners and their two children, ages 2 years and 6 months, simultaneously infected with the dermatophyte trichophyton tonsurans, causing tinea capitis and tinea corporis in the children and tinea corporis in the parents. The parents and older child were successfully treated with oral terbinafine. The infant clinically responded to treatment with topical terbinafine and ketoconazole shampoo but presented with recurrent tinea capitis 12 months later, from which T. tonsurans was cultured. At this time, scalpbrush samples from the other family members failed to culture any fungi, and neither were fungi isolated from the family hairbrushes. The infant then received oral terbinafine, resulting in clinical and mycologic cure. After a further 12 months follow-up, there has been no mycologic evidence of recurrence in any family member.
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4/32. Unsuspected sporotrichosis in childhood.

    We report 10 prepubertal girls with sporotrichosis who were misdiagnosed because they had solitary ulcerative skin nodules, rather than a "sporotrichoid" pattern of multiple linear nodules. All had positive cultures for sporothrix schenckii. We urge clinicians to consider sporotrichosis in the differential diagnosis of a solitary skin nodule.
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5/32. The definition of trichophyton rubrum syndrome.

    Although chronic widespread dermatophyte infection is reported widely in the literature, neither a uniform nomenclature, nor even a clear definition of this syndrome have been established so far. Thus, we suggest trichophyton rubrum syndrome (TRS) for denomination and define the following obligatory clinical and mycological criteria for TRS. (A) skin lesions at the following four sites: (1) feet, often involving soles; (2) hands, often involving palms; (3) nails; and (4) at least one lesion in another location than (1) (2) or (3), except for groins. (B) Positive microscopic analyses of potassium hydroxide preparations of skin scrapings in all four locations. (C) Identification of trichophyton rubrum by cell culture at three of the four locations at least. For diagnosis of TRS the criteria (A) and (B) and (C) have to be fulfilled. This standardization is a prerequisite for further investigations of underlying mechanisms of this disease. The typical clinical pattern of TRS is illustrated by the presentation of two paradigmatic cases.
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6/32. Tinea incognito caused by trichophyton mentagrophytes -- a case report.

    A case of widespread tinea due to trichophyton mentagrophytes is described. A healthy 75-year-old woman presented with 134 typical tinea corporis and faciei lesions previously treated with topical steroids. The diagnosis was based on direct mycologic examination and culture. The treatment with oral administration of terbinafine for four weeks and topical application of clotrimazole resulted in complete clinical resolution of the lesions
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7/32. Preseptal cellulitis caused by trichophyton (ringworm).

    A 10-year-old boy with a past medical history significant for chicken pox at 7 years of age was referred to our eye center by an outside ophthalmologist for a 15-day history of worsening right-sided preseptal cellulitis. The patient reported photophobia, pruritus, and pain in the eyelid region. There appeared to be vesicular lesions on the eyelids. Empiric therapy with oral antibacterial and antiviral medications failed to resolve the preseptal cellulitis. Lid cultures revealed coagulase negative staphylococcus, Streptococcal viridans, and a trichophyton species of fungus. The infection was successfully treated with two courses of oral itraconazole. This is the first case of preseptal cellulitis caused by this dermatophyte that we could find in the literature.
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8/32. Tinea barbae due to trichophyton verrucosum.

    A 25 year-old male, a dairy farmer, had noticed an annular scaly erythema on the left cheek since 3 weeks, and visited a dermatological clinic for the eruption. diagnosis of tinea faciei was made and he was treated with oral anti-histamine medicine and by topical application of anti-fungal ointment. However, the eruption worsened and enlarged so that he visited the department of dermatology of Kumiai Hospital on October 19, 1997. He was in good general health. physical examination disclosed papules and pustules with swelling and erythema on the chin and cheeks. The results of routine laboratory investigations were within normal limits except for white blood cell (9,800/mm(3)) and C reactive protein (2 ). A small white-yellowish colony was grown on brain heart infusion agar culture of the biopsied specimen of the lower jaw. Histopathological features showed epidermal hyperplasia with elongation of rate ridges and granulomatous changes around hair follicles in the dermis with many mononuclear cells and giant cells, where many positive spores and fine filamentous structures with PAS and Grocott stains were seen. Based on clinical, histopathological and mycological findings, a diagnosis of trichophyton verrucosum was made. The patient was treated with oral itraconazole (100 mg/day) for two months. There was a good clinical response and no recurrence during three years and six months.
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9/32. urticaria associated with dermatophytosis.

    BACKGROUND: Although urticaria has been reported in association with tinea or other fungal infections, usually this relationship is considered coincidental. CLINICAL CASE: We report the case of a patient that developed two episodies of generalised urticaria associated with dermatophytosis. An allergologic studied was performed. skin prick tests with a battery of common inhalant allergens and foods were negative. A culture of scrapings from lesions was performed and epidermophyton floccosum colonies were identified. The patient was treated with oral antihistamines and topical clotrimazole and the skin lesion and urticaria healed in 14 days in the first episode and in 10 days in the second one. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest a relationship between dermatophytosis and urticaria. Therefore, the allergologist should be aware of tinea infection as a cause of urticaria.
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10/32. trichophyton raubitschekii: a new agent of dermatophytosis in brazil?

    A microbiological and ultrastructural study of trichophyton raubitschekii recovered from a patient with tinea faciei is presented. This is the second case of isolation of this fungus in Sao Paulo and the sixth case in brazil. Upon culture, the morphological pattern and the physiological tests performed confirmed the identification of T. raubitschekii. The ultrastructural study of T. raubitschekii showed the presence of a membrane-like structure located in the outer portion of the hyphal walls. This structure was bi-stratified and very like the one observed in T. rubrum. Is T. raubitschekii a new fungus emerging in brazil or is it a T. rubrum variant?
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