Cases reported "Tinnitus"

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1/22. An aneurysm of the petrous internal carotid artery.

    Internal carotid artery aneurysms are a rare cause of pulsatile tinnitus and conductive hearing loss but should be borne in mind when there is a suspected diagnosis of glomus jugulare or high-riding jugular bulb. Most cases are congenital. We present a case of otorrhagia which was initially thought to be a glomus jugulare, the diagnosis of internal carotid artery aneurysm was made at angiography and treated by balloon embolization.
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ranking = 1
keywords = glomus
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2/22. Therapeutic embolization of the dural arteriovenous malformation involving the jugular bulb.

    Pulsatile tinnitus is a rarely occurring symptom of vascular origin. Most frequently, the symptoms are due to an arteriovenous malformation, to a tumor of the jugular glomus or to a local arterial stenosis. A 39-yr-old Korean male suffering from pulsatile tinnitus of the left ear was diagnosed to have dural arteriovenous malformation of the jugular bulb. magnetic resonance imaging and angiography revealed a high-velocity vascular lesion encroaching the internal jugular vein and sigmoid sinuses. Digital subtraction angiography demonstrated a dural arteriovenous malformation involving the jugular bulb. The arterial supply was from the neuromeningeal branch of the left ascending pharyngeal artery and inferior tympanic artery. Stenosis of the left jugular vein caused retrograde venous drainage through the contralateral transverse sinus. Superselective embolization of these feeding arteries was successfully performed using 25% mixture of N-butylcyanoacrylate and lipiodol. In postembolization period, his complaints of pulsatile tinnitus and buzzing noise behind his left ear disappeared.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = glomus
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3/22. Sonographic findings in glomus tympanicum tumor.

    A glomus tympanicum tumor that is associated with a visible retrotympanic mass is the most frequent cause of pulsatile tinnitus. The preoperative diagnostic approach to this lesion includes a meticulous physical examination as well as high-resolution CT, magnetic resonance angiography, and digital angiography, which can also be used for preoperative embolization. We report the use of color transcranial Doppler sonography in the evaluation of glomus tympanicum tumor in a 67-year-old woman with a 3-year history of left tinnitus. An otoscopic examination revealed a reddish pulsatile mass behind an intact tympanic membrane. No lesions were visualized on gray-scale sonography. Contrast-enhanced color transcranial Doppler sonography showed a vascular ovoid mass that measured 2 x 1 x 1 cm; spectral analysis of the lesion revealed arterial flow with a low resistance index. color transcranial Doppler sonography helped define the dimensions and vascular characteristics of the lesion.
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ranking = 511.53857223702
keywords = glomus tympanicum, tympanicum, glomus
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4/22. Middle ear hemangioma: a case report.

    Hemangiomas are common benign vascular tumors, but they have rarely been reported in the middle ear. They can mimic glomus tumor in appearance when encountered as middle ear masses. A case of a right-sided middle ear hemangioma in a 51-year-old woman who suffered from pulsatile tinnitus is presented with a review of the relevant literature.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = glomus
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5/22. Jugulotympanic paraganglioma (glomus tumour) presenting with recurrent epistaxis.

    A case is presented where a left jugulotympanic paraganglioma (JTP) extended to the nasopharynx and the patient presented with recurrent epistaxis. Although initial biopsy of an aural polyp had been suggestive of the diagnosis several years previously, the diagnosis was not confirmed until the patient presented with recurrent epistaxis and severe anaemia. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case reported of such a presentation of JTP.
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ranking = 2
keywords = glomus
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6/22. Complete resection of a complex glomus jugulare tumor with extensive venous involvement. Case report.

    The authors describe a case of a complex glomus jugulare tumor with extensive involvement of the venous system. The entire left internal jugular vein up to its innominate insertion was involved with tumor, with proximal extension to the sigmoid sinus, transverse sinus, and the torcular herophili. Gross-total resection of the tumor required a two-stage median sternotomy. This is the first case report of a glomus jugulare tumor in which there was such extensive involvement of the venous system, requiring a multidisciplinary team approach for complete resection.
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ranking = 3
keywords = glomus
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7/22. Tympanic paragangliomas: case reports.

    Glomus tumors, also called paragangliomas, originate from nonchromaffin cells. The tumor is typically vascular and grows from capillary and pre-capillary vessels in-between epithelial cells. It is worth mentioning that the most common symptoms are pulsating tinnitus and hearing loss. Imaging studies (CT and MRI) are necessary for diagnosis. This paper shows five patients seen at the Hospital between 1995 and 2001 presenting glomus tympanicum. women were most commonly affected, and the age ranged from 48 to 60 years (mean age of 50 years). The most common complaints were pulsating tinnitus and hearing loss. All patients were treated surgically.
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ranking = 85.25642870617
keywords = glomus tympanicum, tympanicum, glomus
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8/22. Pulsatile tinnitus: treatment with clonazepam and propranolol.

    Pulsatile tinnitus synchronous with heartbeat is rare and normally has vascular origin: arterial (malformation, arterial anatomical variation) or venous (aberrant jugular bulb, glomus tumors, tympanic glomus tumor). Early etiology identification is essential for appropriate treatment to be established. Magnetic angioresonance makes the vascular identification possible and precise. We report a case of arterial anatomical variation in which the treatment was propranolol and clonazepam, showing tinnitus improvement.
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ranking = 1
keywords = glomus
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9/22. Glomus jugulare tumours. (A series of 21 cases).

    Twenty-one cases of glomus jugulare tumours were analysed in retrospect. Six had been treated surgically, ten by irradiation, and five by a combination of incomplete surgical excision followed by irradiation. Recurrences appeared in four cases, but no patient has died of the tumour during the follow-up period which is from a few months to eleven years. Metastases were not found in any case. The optimal time of irradiation in combined treatment is discussed.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = glomus
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10/22. Tympanometry in the evaluation of vascular lesions of the middle ear and tinnitus of vascular origin.

    The occurrence of vascular perturbations in the tympanogram in association with glomus tumors has previously been noted in the literature. We have broadened the scope of this method of diagnosis in the study of 3 glomus tympanicum and 3 glomus jugulare tumors, 1 dehiscent high jugular bulb, 1 aberrant carotid artery in the middle ear and 2 cases of pulsatile tinnitus of vascular origin. Analysis of illustrative tympanograms at standard and at increased sensitivity (x 20) obtained in these cases are presented. The following factors as they relate to the mechanism of recording the vascular perturbations are presented: air pressure and/or presence of fluid in the middle ear; compliance of the tympanic membrane and ossicular chain as affected by the mass, size and degree of vascularity of the mass and presence of extraneous sounds. A new method of recording the vascular perturbations utilizing a time-base generator affixed to an X-Y plotter is described. It is the purpose of this study to demonstrate the utility of obtaining tympanograms at standard and at increased sensitivity in the evaluation of vascular middle ear lesions and tinnitus of vascular origin.
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ranking = 86.25642870617
keywords = glomus tympanicum, tympanicum, glomus
(Clic here for more details about this article)
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