Cases reported "Tinnitus"

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1/16. Persistent bilateral hearing loss after shunt placement for hydrocephalus. Case report.

    Transient hearing decrease following loss of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has been reported in patients undergoing lumbar puncture, spinal anesthesia, myelography, and/or different neurosurgical interventions. The authors present the first well-documented case of a patient with persistent bilateral low-frequency sensorineural hearing loss after shunt placement for hydrocephalus and discuss the possible pathophysiological mechanisms including the role of the cochlear aqueduct. These findings challenge the opinion that hearing decreases after loss of CSF are always transient. The authors provide a suggestion for treatment.
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ranking = 1
keywords = aqueduct
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2/16. Traumatic perilymphatic fistula: how long can symptoms persist? A follow-up report.

    In the past 18 years 68 ears (average 3.8 per year) were explored for perilymphatic fistula (PLF). A total of nine (13%) ears had a fistula identified at operation. patients with a previous history of otologic surgery were excluded from this review. The most common etiology for PLF was head trauma (4 of 9). Most patients had persistent symptoms lasting months (average 6.7). Eighty-three percent of all patients had sudden or fluctuating hearing loss, 77 percent had vertigo or dysequilibrium, and 61 percent had tinnitus. vertigo was the most commonly improved symptom postoperatively, and only 25 percent of patients had improved hearing. There were no major complications. The authors discuss indications for operation, criteria for diagnosis of PLF, and audiometric and electronystagmographic findings. This report agrees with other recent data indicating that exploration for fistula is an uncommon procedure performed by otologists.
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ranking = 254.25142560982
keywords = perilymphatic
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3/16. Hypoplastic endolymphatic sac, hydrops, and Mondini deformity: a case report.

    The Mondini deformity of the inner ear is usually associated with a large vestibular aqueduct and endolymphatic sac. The authors present a case with a hypoplastic sac and endolymphatic hydrops, which are presumed to be the cause of the Meniere's syndrome symptoms that occurred in mid-life.
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ranking = 1
keywords = aqueduct
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4/16. Perilymphatic fistula in cabin attendants: an incapacitating consequence of flying with common cold.

    A perilymphatic fistula (PLF) is an abnormal communication between the inner ear and the middle ear that leaks perilymph. PLF is considered rare, but is known to occur during childbirth, straining, weightlifting, head trauma, and diving with middle ear equalizing problems. It has also, anecdotally, been described in connection with flying. The symptoms are uncharacteristic vertigo and, in some cases, hearing impairment and tinnitus. This study describes four cases of PLF during a period of 6 mo in a major Scandinavian airline company employing approximately 3000 cabin attendants (CAs). None of the cases were diagnosed at the primary health care level. All were referred to the aviation Medical Center for investigation. The PLF diagnosis was based on the case history, Platform pressure Test (a fistula test), and other vestibular tests. Only one CA has been able to return to flying duties. The article emphasizes the risk of flying with poor middle ear equalization and the necessity of reminding crews and airline companies to "never fly with a common cold".
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ranking = 50.850285121964
keywords = perilymphatic
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5/16. Distal renal tubular acidosis associated with large vestibular aqueduct and sensorineural hearing loss.

    CONCLUSIONS: hearing loss and equilibrium dysfunction have different etiologies in patients with large vestibular aqueduct syndrome. We suggest that all children with distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA) should be subjected to an equilibrium study and audiological evaluation, as well as to a CT or MRI scan. OBJECTIVE: dRTA has been described in association with sensorineural hearing loss, but there are no reported cases that have been examined in detail using audiological and equilibrium studies. We report here a case of progressive sensorineural hearing loss with a large vestibular aqueduct and dRTA, and the results of audiological and equilibrium studies. MATERIAL AND methods: A 31-year-old female presented with hearing loss, tinnitus and vertigo. She had been treated with oral sodium citrate, potassium citrate and potassium chloride supplementation because of dRTA since the age of 1 month. RESULTS: The pure-tone audiogram of the patient was off the scale for the right ear and showed progressive sensorineural hearing loss for the left ear. ice-water caloric testing showed canal paresis on the left side. temporal bone CT and inner ear MRI revealed a large vestibular aqueduct and a large endolymphatic sac on both sides.
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ranking = 7
keywords = aqueduct
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6/16. tinnitus in an active duty navy diver: A review of inner ear barotrauma, tinnitus, and its treatment.

    This case elucidates subtle cues that must be appreciated by the examiner in diving related injuries, who may not have experience with barotrauma-mediated pathology. Inner-ear barotrauma (IEBT) does not mandate ostensible hearing loss or vertigo; tinnitus may be the sole manifestation. Symptoms may present hours or even days post-dive. A common misconception exists that there are no efficacious treatment options for IEBT short of surgery for an overt perilymphatic fistula. Treatment options are available including acute high dose steroid administration, as prescribed for acute noise-induced or idiopathic hearing loss, optimally administered within three weeks of the acute insult. tinnitus does not necessarily constitute a chronic untreatable symptom, which the patient must learn "to live with".
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ranking = 50.850285121964
keywords = perilymphatic
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7/16. Pneumolabyrinth in perilymphatic fistula: report of three cases.

    In three patients with perilymphatic fistula, exploratory tympanotomy revealed air bubbles emerging through the ruptured round window membrane. review of the literature disclosed three case reports in which air was demonstrated in the labyrinth in association with perilymphatic fistula. Experimental evidence that air could enter the labyrinth through a defect of the round window membrane was described in two articles. In our patients, the perilymphatic fistula was produced by implosive force. When a perilymphatic fistula was produced by implosive force, or in the case of a pre-existing perilymphatic fistula, we assume, air may enter the scala tympani through the defect of the round window membrane if the middle ear pressure rises beyond a certain limit. Sudden onset of deafness and reversibility of hearing in perilymphatic fistula could be attributable to the presence of air bubble in the scala tympani--pneumolabyrinth--which might disturb propagation of the traveling wave of the basilar membrane.
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ranking = 508.50285121964
keywords = perilymphatic
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8/16. ataxia and hearing loss secondary to perilymphatic fistula.

    ataxia is rarely attributed to lesions of the peripheral vestibular system. In 1973, the first case of ataxia and hearing loss secondary to a labyrinthine fistula was reported. Until now, this syndrome has not been reported in patients under the age of 10 years. A case is presented of a 5-year-old boy with symptoms of ataxia and hearing loss as well as vertigo and tinnitus after head trauma. Three physical findings appear to be most characteristic of patients with perilymphatic fistulas: a positive fistula response, positive positional testing with the involved ear down, and evidence of vestibular ataxia when testing station and gait. The absolute diagnosis of perilymphatic fistula can only be established by exploration of the middle ear space. If a fistula is found, it may be sealed with soft tissue and, if this fails, actual stapedectomy may be required.
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ranking = 305.10171073178
keywords = perilymphatic
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9/16. Spontaneous perilymphatic fistula.

    Sudden hearing loss from spontaneous perilymphatic fistula in a child managed by prompt surgical intervention and with recovery of hearing has not previously been reported. The historical and contemporary theories of fistula formation are reviewed. A child with spontaneous oval window rupture associated with a congenital malformation of the stapes and cochlear aqueduct is described together with his complete recovery of hearing following surgical repair. Some rationales explaining the mechanism of oval window rupture in this patient are suggested.
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ranking = 255.25142560982
keywords = perilymphatic, aqueduct
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10/16. adult aqueductal stenosis presenting with fluctuating hearing loss and vertigo. Report of two cases.

    Two cases of aqueductal stenosis presenting with fluctuating hearing loss, tinnitus, and vertigo are presented. Audiovestibulometric assessment of both cases disclosed the characteristic pattern of disorder of the membranous inner ear. Non-tumoral aqueductal stenosis was demonstrated by computerized tomography in one case and by positive contrast ventriculography in the other. Shunting procedures of the cerebrospinal fluid resulted in resolution of inner ear dysfunction in both patients.
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ranking = 6
keywords = aqueduct
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