Cases reported "Tonsillitis"

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1/14. Lingual tonsillectomy for refractory paroxysmal cough.

    Historically, the lingual tonsils are the most neglected members of Waldeyer's ring. They are often overlooked even in a thorough head and neck exam because of their anatomic location and the ambiguous constellation of symptoms which they produce when they are diseased or enlarged. The lingual tonsils have been reported to be associated with a variety of upper aerodigestive tract symptoms including odynophagia, dysphagia, otalgia, globus, halitosis, chronic cough, and dyspnea. Many patients with lingual tonsillar pathology may undergo extensive work-up for some of these non-specific upper airway complaints by their primary physician before referral to an otolaryngologist. Consequently, the diagnosis of lingual tonsillar disease requires a high index of suspicion and a thorough physical exam including evaluation of the tongue base and hypophaynx with indirect mirror or fiberoptic exam. In order to draw attention to this frequently unrecognized entity, we present a case report of a child with chronic cough resulting from lingual tonsillar hypertrophy.
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ranking = 1
keywords = airway
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2/14. Poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis presenting as impending airway obstruction.

    The presence of poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis in the pediatric patient remains a diagnostic challenge to the emergency physician. The variability of both patient presentation and laboratory parameters often obscures the diagnosis. We describe a child who presented to the emergency department with subglottic edema and the possibility of impending airway compromise. The child was admitted to the hospital under close observation, and several days later, the diagnosis of poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis was made.
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ranking = 114.22239992555
keywords = airway obstruction, airway
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3/14. Narcotic administration and stenosing lesions of the upper airway--a potentially lethal combination.

    Two cases are reported where significant narrowing of the upper airway in association with narcotic administration resulted in respiratory compromise and death. Case 1: A 29-year-old woman with upper airway narrowing due to tonsillar enlargement from an Epstein-Barr infection was admitted to hospital, administered morphine and left in a room on her own with the door closed. She was found dead several hours later. At autopsy there was significant narrowing of the upper airway due to tonsillomegaly with a blood morphine level of 0.16 mg/L. Case 2: A 48-year-old woman with severe narrowing of her glottic inlet from recurrent squamous cell carcinoma and an intravenous drug taking history was found dead at her home. At autopsy there was evidence of recent and remote intravenous drug administration with marked narrowing of the glottis due to a recurrent tumor with a blood morphine level of 0.48 mg/L. In both cases, death was due to the effects of severe upper airway narrowing in combination with the respiratory depressant actions of morphine. Additional exacerbating factors may have included muscle weakness, drowsiness and reduced clearance of airway secretions from the effects of morphine. Narcotic administration in individuals with compromised upper airways should be undertaken extremely circumspectly and hospital protocols should ensure constant surveillance if this has been undertaken. Individuals who self administer narcotics should also be made aware of the dangers if there is coincidental upper airway narrowing. Toxicological evaluation in fatal cases of upper airway narrowing/stenosis may be extremely useful in revealing compounding factors such as opiate administration.
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ranking = 12
keywords = airway
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4/14. infectious mononucleosis complicated by lingual tonsillitis.

    Although upper airway obstruction and superimposed infection are well-known complications of infectious mononucleosis, lingual tonsillitis in this context has not been mentioned in the literature. We describe a case of acute bacterial lingual tonsillitis with airway obstruction complicating infectious mononucleosis. The role of the base of tongue region in the pathophysiology of infectious mononucleosis is discussed.
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ranking = 56.611199962774
keywords = airway obstruction, airway
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5/14. Rapid development of cor pulmonale following acute tonsillitis in adults.

    We describe two adult patients in whom acute tonsillitis resulted in the rapid development of cor pulmonale in the absence of clinically evident upper airway obstruction or diffuse obstructive airway disease. Both patients had developed symptoms of sleep apnea and all-night polysomnography confirmed the presence of severe obstructive sleep apnea. These cases emphasize the potentially severe cardiovascular consequences of acute tonsillar hypertrophy in the obese adult patient.
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ranking = 29.305599981387
keywords = airway obstruction, airway
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6/14. Lingual tonsillitis.

    Lingual tonsillitis can cause various signs and symptoms including nocturnal or supine cough, constant discomfort in the throat, glossal pain, and otalgia. Most patients with lingual tonsillitis have already had palatine tonsillectomy. A lingual tonsil may be visible only by using a laryngeal mirror. An embedded foreign body can cause recurrent tonsillitis with abscess formation, and life-threatening airway obstruction may result. Aberrant lingual thyroid may be the only functioning thyroid tissue. cryosurgery and the CO2 laser have made lingual tonsillectomy a safe and simple procedure. An abscess of a lingual tonsil should be drained under general anesthesia, and lingual thyroid should be treated conservatively unless it produces obstructive symptoms.
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ranking = 28.305599981387
keywords = airway obstruction, airway
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7/14. Pseudo aneurysm of the external carotid artery: report of a case.

    The authors report a case of left otorrhagia in a 1-year-old male infant in the presence of a mass involving the parotideal and upper cervical regions, which had appeared after an infection of the upper airways. Non-invasive techniques, such as echography and CT scan, provided useful but contradicting information. Surgery allowed us to define the diagnosis of mycotic aneurysm of the external carotid artery. The authors, after pointing out the extreme rarity of such a pathology, discuss the ethiopathogenetic theories, the clinical features, the diagnosis and the surgical and medical treatment of the disease. Concerning surgery ligation of the external carotid artery is the treatment of choice, since distally the blood flow is provided by a conspicuous collateral circle and because a possible postoperative septic dissemination is avoided.
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ranking = 1
keywords = airway
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8/14. Complications of the 'treatment' of tonsillar infection by traditional healers in nigeria.

    Traditional healers in nigeria attempt to treat tonsillar infections either by performing uvulectomy with a sickle knife or by digital rupture of the tonsil. These procedures result in various complications, including haemorrhage, septicaemia, cellulitis of the neck, peritonsillar and parapharyngeal abscess, upper airway obstruction, and pharyngo-laryngocele with pneumothorax. These complications are illustrated with case reports. The danger of encouraging traditional healers to practise unsupervised and unscientific medicine is stressed.
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ranking = 28.305599981387
keywords = airway obstruction, airway
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9/14. Complications of space infections of the head and neck.

    life threatening infections of odontogenic or upper airway origin may extend to potential spaces formed by fascial planes of the lower head and upper cervical area. The incidence of these "space infections" has been greatly reduced by modern antibiotic therapy. However, serious morbidity and even fatalities continue to occur. Two cases of deep neck infection, (one of odontogenic and one tonsillar in origin) with subsequent mediastinitis, empyema, pericarditis and ultimate survival are reported. One case of deep neck infection, (of odontogenic etiology) and suppurative thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein with ultimate fatal outcome is also reviewed. review of the literature reveals only one previous case report of a survivor of an odontogenic deep neck infection complicated by mediastinitis, empyema and pericarditis. The anatomy, etiology and treatment of complications of these "space infections" of the head and neck are briefly reviewed.
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ranking = 1
keywords = airway
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10/14. Surgical management of airway obstructions during sleep.

    Anatomical or physiological airway obstructions during sleep, of which the patient is unaware, cause daytime sleepiness at first, then signs of decreasing mental function, and eventually in some individuals, pulmonary and systemic hypertension. A few of these patients had been recognized before, the Pickwickian syndrome and in children with cardiac problems and large tonsils. The majority, however, present as sleep disorders. This paper describes our surgical experience with improving the airways of 19 children and adults with daytime somnolence.
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ranking = 142.52799990694
keywords = airway obstruction, airway
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