Cases reported "Tooth, Unerupted"

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1/111. Unerupted second primary mandibular molar positioned inferior to the second premolar: case report.

    This report is a clinical case of a 7-year-old child who presented right impacted second primary mandibular molar. This tooth was positioned inferior to the second premolar successor and a supernumerary tooth superior to the second premolar. Clinical examination did not reveal systemic diseases ot trauma in the facial region. Treatment consisted of the extraction of the impacted second primary molar and the supernumerary tooth. Periodic examination was indicated for follow-up.
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2/111. Primary failure of tooth eruption: a unique case.

    Primary failure of tooth eruption rarely occurs. This case represents a rare clinical situation and appears to reflect a generalized disturbance in the eruptive process, inasmuch as (1) deciduous and permanent dentition are affected, (2) incisors, molars, and premolars are involved in all quadrants, (3) skeletal and craniofacial growth are within normal limits, and (4) no systemic/genetic anomalies were detected. This is the first such case reported in the literature; diagnosis and management are discussed.
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3/111. Spontaneous uprighting of permanent tooth germs after elimination of local eruption obstacles.

    Four clinical cases are presented to demonstrate the self-correcting potential of aberrant tooth germs after the elimination of eruption obstacles (in 2 cases cysts, in 2 other cases severely infraoccluded primary teeth). In the case of the submerging deciduous teeth, the tilted adjacent teeth were orthodontically uprighted after the surgical procedure. Possible causative mechanisms are discussed.
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keywords = tooth, germ
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4/111. Apparent hypodontia: a case of misdiagnosis.

    The case of a 12-year-old girl is reported, whose pretreatment radiograph demonstrated agenesis of two premolars and a canine and slow development of the contralateral premolars. A follow-up radiograph taken 1 year later showed initial mineralization of a tooth germ in the site of one of the apparently missing premolars. The cause, diagnosis, and treatment planning implications of delayed mineralization and slow development of second premolars are discussed with reference to the literature.
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ranking = 0.33337174994516
keywords = tooth, germ
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5/111. Radiographic localization of unerupted maxillary anterior teeth using the vertical tube shift technique: the history and application of the method with some case reports.

    The preferred means of radiographic localization is the parallax method introduced by Clark in 1910. He used 2 periapical radiographs and shifted the tube in the horizontal plane. In 1952, Richards appreciated that a vertical tube shift could also be carried out. No major changes then occurred in the technique until Keur, in australia, in 1986 replaced the periapical radiographs with occlusal radiographs. This modification enables a greater tube movement and therefore a greater shift of the image of the impacted tooth; it also ensures that the whole of the tooth is captured on the radiograph. For the vertical tube shift, Keur introduced the use of a rotational panoramic radiograph with an occlusal radiograph. In 1987, Southall and Gravely discussed this vertical tube shift combination in the English dental literature, and it is now the preferred combination of radiographs for localizing impacted maxillary anterior teeth. Jacobs introduced this method to the American literature in 1999, but it has yet to gain acceptance in the continental European literature. Jacobs recommended, when using this combination, to routinely increase the vertical angulation for the occlusal radiograph by 10 degrees to achieve a greater image shift. Four case reports are presented in this article. Three have photographs taken at surgical exposure to illustrate how the position of the impacted tooth can be accurately predicted by appropriate interpretation of the radiographs.
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6/111. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumour: a case study with radiographic differential diagnostic considerations.

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumours (AOT) are benign, hamartomatous odontogenic lesions that not uncommonly mimic a dentigerous cyst radiographically. Such a case as found involving an unerupted left maxillary canine in a 19-year-old Chinese female is described. The differential diagnosis of some common odontogenic cysts and neoplasms occurring in Malaysians, that may present in a dentigerous relationship to an unerupted tooth is discussed. A brief review of the radiographic literature on AOT is also included.
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7/111. Retention of permanent incisors by mesiodens: a family affair.

    The term mesiodens refers to a supernumerary tooth that is present in the midline of the maxilla between the two central incisors. One or two mesiodentes may be present. We present a rare case of two sisters, in both of whom a pair of mesiodentes caused the retention of permanent incisors. They were referred to our hospital with asymptomatic delayed eruption of upper incisors. This article is written to point out genetic factors as the possible origin of supernumerary teeth.
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8/111. Oral rehabilitation of a child with primary failure of tooth eruption.

    This article describes the prosthetic evaluation and treatment of a 10-year-old female patient with primary failure of tooth eruption. This case is unique in that the failure of eruption affected both the deciduous and permanent dentition in all quadrants, in the absence of any other systemic abnormalities. After diagnostic articulation and a thorough discussion of the treatment with the patient and her parents, complete maxillary and mandibular overdentures were fabricated. The process followed with this preadolescent patient to ensure maximum compliance, success, and encouragement toward a positive attitude in wearing complete dentures is reported.
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9/111. False teeth and real suffering: the social course of 'germectomy' in eastern uganda.

    The removal of the incipient canine teeth ('germectomy') in small babies is a practice carried out in many parts of eastern africa. This article describes how 'germectomy' among the Jop'Adhola in Eastern uganda is an important idiom of distress, referred to as false teeth by English speaking people, and lakijo marach (bad teeth) or gira kwanya (that which is removed) in the local language Dhop'Adhola. Through an analysis of how the notion of false teeth is shaped by macro social forces of war and poverty as well as by negotiations within the local social world, the discussion is taken beyond the question of cultural belief. False teeth as a practice seems to have spread through vast geographical areas within a few decades, but as the example of the Jop'Adhola shows, it has taken a particular social course in eastern uganda--as it is most likely to also have done everywhere else it has gained a footing. By analyzing its social course we may gain insight into important mediating social processes which may have as much to do with actual health outcome in a particular area as health care per se.
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ranking = 0.00023049967097111
keywords = germ
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10/111. Radiographic localization of unerupted mandibular anterior teeth.

    The parallax method and the use of 2 radiographs taken at right angles to each other are the 2 methods generally used to accurately localize teeth. For the parallax method, the combination of a rotational panoramic radiograph with an occlusal radiograph is recommended. This combination involves a vertical x-ray tube shift. Three case reports are presented that illustrate: (1) how this combination can accurately localize unerupted mandibular anterior teeth, (2) how a deceptive appearance of the labiolingual position of the unerupted tooth can be produced in an occlusal radiograph, (3) how increasing the vertical angle of the tube for the occlusal radiograph makes the tube shift easier to discern, (4) why occlusal radiographs are preferable to periapical radiographs for tube shifts, and (5) how localization can also be carried out with 2 radiographs at right angles to each other, one of which is an occlusal radiograph taken with the x-ray tube directed along the long axis of the reference tooth.
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