Cases reported "Tooth, Unerupted"

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1/7. Radiographic localization of unerupted maxillary anterior teeth using the vertical tube shift technique: the history and application of the method with some case reports.

    The preferred means of radiographic localization is the parallax method introduced by Clark in 1910. He used 2 periapical radiographs and shifted the tube in the horizontal plane. In 1952, Richards appreciated that a vertical tube shift could also be carried out. No major changes then occurred in the technique until Keur, in australia, in 1986 replaced the periapical radiographs with occlusal radiographs. This modification enables a greater tube movement and therefore a greater shift of the image of the impacted tooth; it also ensures that the whole of the tooth is captured on the radiograph. For the vertical tube shift, Keur introduced the use of a rotational panoramic radiograph with an occlusal radiograph. In 1987, Southall and Gravely discussed this vertical tube shift combination in the English dental literature, and it is now the preferred combination of radiographs for localizing impacted maxillary anterior teeth. Jacobs introduced this method to the American literature in 1999, but it has yet to gain acceptance in the continental European literature. Jacobs recommended, when using this combination, to routinely increase the vertical angulation for the occlusal radiograph by 10 degrees to achieve a greater image shift. Four case reports are presented in this article. Three have photographs taken at surgical exposure to illustrate how the position of the impacted tooth can be accurately predicted by appropriate interpretation of the radiographs.
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keywords = vertical
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2/7. Radiographic localization of unerupted mandibular anterior teeth.

    The parallax method and the use of 2 radiographs taken at right angles to each other are the 2 methods generally used to accurately localize teeth. For the parallax method, the combination of a rotational panoramic radiograph with an occlusal radiograph is recommended. This combination involves a vertical x-ray tube shift. Three case reports are presented that illustrate: (1) how this combination can accurately localize unerupted mandibular anterior teeth, (2) how a deceptive appearance of the labiolingual position of the unerupted tooth can be produced in an occlusal radiograph, (3) how increasing the vertical angle of the tube for the occlusal radiograph makes the tube shift easier to discern, (4) why occlusal radiographs are preferable to periapical radiographs for tube shifts, and (5) how localization can also be carried out with 2 radiographs at right angles to each other, one of which is an occlusal radiograph taken with the x-ray tube directed along the long axis of the reference tooth.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = vertical
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3/7. Radiographic localization of unerupted teeth: further findings about the vertical tube shift method and other localization techniques.

    The parallax method (image/tube shift method, Clark's rule, Richards' buccal object rule) is recommended to localize unerupted teeth. Richards' contribution to the development of the parallax method is discussed. The favored method for localization uses a rotational panoramic radiograph in combination with an occlusal radiograph involving a vertical shift of the x-ray tube. The use of this combination when localizing teeth and supernumeraries in the premolar region is illustrated. When taking an occlusal radiograph to localize an unerupted maxillary canine, clinical situations are presented where modification of the vertical angulation of the tube of 70 degrees to 75 degrees or of the horizontal position of the tube is warranted. The limitations of axial (true, cross-sectional, vertex) occlusal radiographs are also explored.
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ranking = 0.75
keywords = vertical
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4/7. Infraclusion of primary molars: a review and report of a case.

    The term infraclusion is usually used to define mandibular primary teeth in posterior region that remain below the occlusion level. The degree of infraclusion depends on some factors like deviation below the occlusal plane, and infraclusion of tooth in the alveolar bone. Deficient eruptive force, disturbed metabolism of the periodontal ligament, trauma, local inflammation, deficient local vertical bone growth, disturbance in interaction between normal resorption and hard tissue repair, ankylosis and hereditary components have been given as etiological factors. Complications of infraclused primary molars are tipping of the neighboring teeth, space loss, supraeruption of the antagonists, and dislocations of permanent teeth lying under the primary tooth. In this case report, after reviewing the literature a patient with infraclused mandibular primary second molar has been examined to observe the complications of infraclusion. With an appropriate treatment approach, a proper condition was prepared for the eruption of permanent teeth.
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ranking = 0.125
keywords = vertical
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5/7. Class II correction in a severe hyperdivergent growth pattern, bilateral open bite and oral compromise.

    Severe vertical growth pattern and open bites are frequent problems the orthodontist must resolve but require a proper diagnosis, treatment plan, timing, and mechanotherapy to be properly treated. A case report with these problems is presented.
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ranking = 0.125
keywords = vertical
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6/7. Familial primary failure of eruption of permanent teeth.

    A son and his mother presented with features consistent with a diagnosis of primary failure of eruption. The features of this condition are described together with some aspects of treatment. The impact of the condition on vertical facial growth is discussed.
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ranking = 0.125
keywords = vertical
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7/7. The use of magnets in the comprehensive treatment of congenital partial anodontia: a case report.

    This case report describes the treatment of an adult patient with a combination of fixed and removable prosthodontics. The treatment involved increasing the patient's vertical dimension of occlusion, placing two osseointegrated implants, making six surveyed crowns, fabricating a maxillary partial denture, and using magnets to help retain the mandibular partial denture. The clinical steps for using a type of intraoral magnet are described.
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ranking = 0.125
keywords = vertical
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