Cases reported "Tooth Abrasion"

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1/29. Treating severe bruxism with botulinum toxin.

    BACKGROUND: Locally administered botulinum toxin, or BTX, is an effective treatment for various movement disorders. Its usefulness in treating bruxism, however, has not been systematically evaluated. SUBJECTS AND methods: The authors studied 18 subjects with severe bruxism and whose mean duration of symptoms was 14.8 /- 10.0 years (range three-40 years). These subjects audibly ground their teeth and experienced tooth wear and difficulty speaking, swallowing or chewing. Medical or dental procedures had failed to alleviate their symptoms. The authors administered a total of 241 injections of BTX type A, or BTX A, in the subjects' masseter muscles during 123 treatment visits. The mean dose of the BTX A was 61.7 /- 11.1 mouse units, or MU (range 25-100 MU), per side for the masseter muscles. RESULTS: The mean total duration of response was 19.1 /- 17.0 weeks (range six-78 weeks), and the mean peak effect on a scale of 0 to 4, in which 4 is equal to total abolishment of grinding, was 3.4 /- 0.9. Only one subject (5.6 percent) reported having experienced dysphagia with BTX A. CONCLUSION: The results of this study suggest that BTX administered by skilled practitioners is a safe and effective treatment for people with severe bruxism, particularly those with associated movement disorders. It should be considered only for those patients refractory to conventional therapy. Future placebo-controlled studies may be useful in further evaluating the potential of BTX in the treatment of bruxism.
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ranking = 1
keywords = dental
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2/29. Restoring esthetics and anterior guidance in worn anterior teeth. A conservative multidisciplinary approach.

    BACKGROUND: Developments in adhesive dentistry have given the dental profession new restorative materials and technology to restore esthetics and function to the worn anterior dentition. This article illustrates, through a clinical case study, the clinical requirements for restoring esthetic harmony and functional stability to the worn anterior dentition. CASE DESCRIPTION: The author presents the case of a 24-year-old man who sought esthetic dental treatment because he was unhappy with the appearance of his maxillary anterior teeth. The review of his dental history revealed that he ground his teeth at night. The author performed a complete evaluation of the causes of the patient's bruxism and created a diagnostic preview to, among other things, develop the relationship between the condylar and anterior guidance and to establish the esthetic requirements for the final restorations. Treatment included periodontal recontouring, tooth preparation and placement of temporary and then permanent restorations; the patient also was given an occlusal guard to protect the restorations against future bruxing. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Whatever the cause of occlusal instability, it is important that the restorative dentist be able to recognize its signs--such as tooth hypermobility, tooth wear, periodontal breakdown, occlusal dimpling, stress fractures, exostosis, muscle enlargement and loss of posterior disclusion. When restoring the worn dentition, the clinician should bear in mind the five P's: proper planning prevents poor performance.
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ranking = 3
keywords = dental
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3/29. tongue piercing and associated oral and dental complications.

    The insertion of metal objects into intraoral and perioral sites is growing in popularity. However, there are numerous oral and dental complications associated with tongue piercing. Fifteen patients with tongue piercings (pierced in the body of the tongue, anterior to the lingual frenum) attending the dental office of the authors, with and without complaints, were clinically and radiographically examined. The most common dental problem registered was chipping of teeth. Furthermore, two cracked teeth and four teeth with cusp fractures were also seen. One case of selective dental abrasion was registered. Trauma to the lingual anterior gingiva was the most common gingival problem. A salivary flow stimulating effect was only reported by 2 of the 15 individuals. None of the patients complained of interference with speech, mastication and swallowing. One case of galvanic currents produced by the appliance was registered. On the basis of the registered data, we concluded that patients need to be better informed of the potential complications associated with tongue and oral piercings, and that the dental profession can serve this role.
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ranking = 10.651765498014
keywords = gingival, dental
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4/29. Dental erosion: diagnostic-based noninvasive treatment.

    Lesions that result from dental erosion can be difficult to recognize--particularly when abrasion and attrition are also present. Consequently, dental erosion is often misdiagnosed and mistreated by radical restorative modalities that compromise the vitality of the pulp. This article provides clinicians with knowledge concerning the diagnosis of the complex lesions of dental wear and demonstrates the conservative treatment of this condition. Two cases that exhibit marked tooth wear in anterior teeth and their subsequent restoration utilizing occlusal principles and composite resin are presented.
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ranking = 3
keywords = dental
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5/29. Syndromes with salivary dysfunction predispose to tooth wear: case reports of congenital dysfunction of major salivary glands, Prader-Willi, congenital rubella, and Sjogren's syndromes.

    Four cases-of congenital dysfunction of the major salivary glands as well as of Prader-Willi, congenital rubella, and Sjogren's syndromes-were identified in a series of 500 patients referred for excessive tooth wear. Although there was evidence of consumption of highly acidic drinks, some occlusal parafunction, and unacceptable toothbrushing habits, salivary dysfunction was the salient factor predisposing a patient to tooth wear in these syndromal cases. The 500 subjects have been characterized either as having medical conditions and medications that predispose them to xerostomia or lifestyles in which workplace- and sports-related dehydration lead to reduced salivary flow. Normal salivation, by buffering capacity, clearance by swallowing, pellicle formation, and capacity for remineralization of demineralized enamel, protects the teeth from extrinsic and intrinsic acids that initiate dental erosion. Thus, the syndromes, unrelated in many respects, underline the importance of normal salivation in the protection of teeth against tooth wear by erosion, attrition, and abrasion.
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ranking = 1
keywords = dental
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6/29. Soft tissue root coverage as treatment for cervical abrasion and caries.

    Root exposure caused by gingival recession may result in cervical abrasion, root caries, root sensitivity, and compromised esthetics. Although cervical root lesions can be treated with Class V restorations, there may be advantages in treating them with soft tissue grafts for root coverage since they restore the dento-gingival unit to its prerecession condition. The rationale for root coverage with soft tissue grafts is reviewed and two cases are presented of successful root coverage procedures in which gingival recession associated with cervical abrasion and caries was present.
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ranking = 4.9552964940423
keywords = gingival
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7/29. diagnosis and management of maxillary incisors affected by incisal wear: an interdisciplinary case report.

    In the attempt to restore anterior teeth affected by erosion and bruxism, many clinicians have been frustrated with the constant restorative failures. Frequently, these failures are attributed to the restorative materials employed, especially in cases in which composite resins are used. However, some flaws of the restorations are related to the oversight of occlusal principles. The purpose of this article is to discuss the etiology, signs, and symptoms of incisal wear, with special attention to that caused by bruxism and chemical erosion. Relatively simple management techniques (e.g., occlusal adjustment, adhesive restorations) are proposed, and the diagnosis and management of a representative clinical case is presented. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: In some cases of bruxism and/or dental erosion, it is possible to acquire space to recuperate the esthetics and function of maxillary incisors affected by incisal wear through a conservative treatment associated with the control of the etiologic factors.
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ranking = 1
keywords = dental
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8/29. Gingival recessions caused by lip piercing: case report.

    fear of losing the teeth is common among patients presenting with gingival recession. This report describes a case in which unusual gingival recessions were caused by lip piercing. Periodontal treatment involved removal of the causative agent, hygiene instruction, scaling and root planing, and coverage of the root with a subepithelial connective tissue graft. The therapeutic measures applied in this case yielded satisfactory root coverage, an increase in the width of the keratinized gingiva, improvement in hygiene status and absence of dental hypersensitivity.
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ranking = 4.3035309960282
keywords = gingival, dental
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9/29. Tooth surface floss loss: unusual interproximal and lingual cervical lesions as a result of bizarre dental flossing.

    There are many reported cases of cervical abrasion/erosion cavities in the literature with various theories offered in support of their pathogenesis. The vast majority of these cases involve the labial cervical regions of the affected teeth. This case report describes an unusual dental presentation of severe lingual cervical and interproximal lesions predominantly affecting the upper and lower anterior and premolar teeth. The differential diagnosis is presented, along with the likely cause of the lesions: in this case, a bizarre oral hygiene technique. The proposed treatment plan is outlined and the problems associated with restoring such cavities are highlighted.
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ranking = 5
keywords = dental
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10/29. Restoring the worn dentition.

    Strong dental materials and dental porcelains are providing dentists with restorative opportunities that are more conservative because they require less destruction of healthy tooth structure and yield a more esthetic result. In cases of severe wear due to attrition, abrasion, and erosion, this process can be stopped, restoring the esthetics and function by using proper techniques and materials. The case report described in this article demonstrates the conservative restoration of severe wear due to attrition and erosion. Teeth were lengthened, wear was restored, and further wear was ceased by using a combination of bonded porcelain, a heat, light, and self-cure resin system, and a new glass-ionomer restorative material. The result was a strong, durable restoration (that required no anesthesia) with high esthetics.
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ranking = 2
keywords = dental
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