Cases reported "Tooth Avulsion"

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11/42. Rehabilitative treatment after unsuccessful teeth replantation: a case report.

    A nine-year-old boy suffered a severe facial trauma in a bicycle crash, which resulted in the avulsion and subluxation of upper central incisors. Teeth were repositioned and stabilized, attempting to achieve a successful replantation. root resorption occurred, teeth were extracted, followed by orthodontic treatment, and esthetic procedures, modifying laterals and canines. This article reports an attempt and failure of replantation, providing alternatives for achieving patient's satisfaction, applying a variety of techniques and areas of dental profession.
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ranking = 1
keywords = resorption
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12/42. Replantation of an avulsed incisor after prolonged dry storage: a case report.

    Management of tooth avulsion in the permanent dentition often presents a challenge. Definitive treatment planning and consultation with specialists is seldom possible at the time of emergency treatment. Replantation of the avulsed tooth can restore esthetic appearance and occlusal function shortly after the injury. This article describes the management of a child with an avulsed maxillary permanent incisor that had been air-dried for about 18 hours. The replanted incisor retained its esthetic appearance and functionality 2 years after replantation, yet the long-term prognosis is not good because of progressive replacement root resorption.
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ranking = 1
keywords = resorption
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13/42. Reposition of intruded permanent incisor by a combination of surgical and orthodontic approach: a case report.

    This report presents a case of a completely intrusive luxation of an immature permanent central incisor in a 7 years 9 months-old girl. Because there are severe intrusive trauma and cortical alveolar bone fracture, it was impossible to reposition with orthodontic or surgical method alone. The intruded tooth was repositioned to healthy alveolar bone level by using surgical extrusion and stabilization with sutures and periodontal pack. After healing of adjacent bone, the intruded maxillary central incisor erupted orthodontically by removable orthodontic appliance. It was moved from a high position to level of adjacent tooth in about 7 months. A radiograph was taken 6 months after ceasing forced eruption, which demonstrated minor root resorption, but the alveolar bone height had increased.
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ranking = 1
keywords = resorption
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14/42. Healing of root resorption: a case report.

    External resorption is sequelae of necrotic periodontal membrane over a large area of root following an injury to the tooth. This usually occurs after severe dental injuries such as intrusion, severe luxations or exarticulation injuries complicated by a prolonged extra oral period. This case report presents a clinical and radiographic follow up (13 months) of treatment of inflammatory external root resorption on maxillary central incisor using Vitapex. Gradual healing of resorption was observed radiographically with no tenderness or pathological mobility.
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ranking = 7
keywords = resorption
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15/42. External inflammatory and replacement resorption of luxated, and avulsed replanted permanent incisors: a review and case presentation.

    External inflammatory resorption and replacement resorption are complicating factors that may result from traumatic dental injuries when the tooth is luxated or avulsed and replanted. Resorption may, ultimately, result in loss of the tooth. However, with appropriate treatment, the prognosis for these teeth is greatly improved, with the possibility of preventing or arresting resorption. The purpose of this paper is to review these trauma entities, to discuss factors that influence the occurrence of resorption and to describe the most appropriate treatment. A case is presented, illustrating both resorption entities, but with varying outcomes.
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ranking = 9
keywords = resorption
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16/42. root resorption in dental trauma: 45 cases followed for 5 years.

    We aimed to: (i) study the prevalence of root resorption after luxation or avulsion injuries on permanent teeth referred to our dental clinic over a 3-year period; (ii) study the relationship between type of injury and resultant type of resorption complication; and (iii) evaluate success of treatment protocols for various resorption complications. We observed 1943 patients with dental trauma, aged between 2 and 26 years, referred to the Accident and Emergency Department of the Dental Clinic, University of Brescia, from 1st September 1997 to 31st December 2001. Of these, 261 permanent teeth had sustained luxation (n = 188) or avulsion (n = 73) injuries. Permanent teeth luxation and avulsion injuries occurred most often in upper incisors (75%) of patients mostly aged 12-21 years, with males more commonly affected than females (68.3% vs. 31.7%). These cases were followed for 5 years, and complications and response to treatment were recorded. root resorption was observed in 45 (17.24%) of these cases. Of the 45 cases with resorption, 9 were associated with luxation injury (20%) while 36 (80%) with avulsion. We distinguished 30 cases of inflammatory root resorption (18 transient and 12 progressive) and 15 cases of ankylosis and osseous replacement. When resorption was recognized, quick and effective treatment could still result in an excellent functional and aesthetic outcome for these teeth.
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ranking = 11
keywords = resorption
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17/42. tooth replantation after traumatic avulsion: a 27-year follow up.

    This report presents a case of replantation of a traumatically avulsed central incisor in a 32-year-old woman. The tooth was replanted after a 30-min extra-alveolar period. Emergency unconventional immobilization was performed, using 2-0 chromic gut, and a restorative composite made Gunning-type splint. The tooth is still in place 27 years after replantation (1976 to date) without marked resorption.
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ranking = 1
keywords = resorption
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18/42. Emergency orthodontic treatment after the traumatic intrusive luxation of maxillary incisors.

    Treatment of traumatically intruded teeth is based largely on empirical clinical experience rather than on scientific data. The aim of this qualitative meta-analysis was to provide an evidence base to evaluate the orthodontic repositioning approach. In a medline search of the literature in English, 14 reported patients involving 22 teeth were found to have been treated by this modality. Additionally, 3 new patients, involving 9 intruded teeth and presented herein, were combined to form a total study sample of 17 subjects (7 girls, 10 boys, aged 8.9 /- 1.2 years). Orthodontic extrusive forces were applied in the immediate posttrauma period (up to 3 months), with a variety of orthodontic appliances. Repositioning was achieved for 90.3% of the affected teeth but failed in 9.7% because of inflammatory resorption (2 teeth) or a misdiagnosis of root fracture (1 tooth). Early complications included loss of pulp vitality and external root resorption. All intruded teeth with closed root apices lost their vitality regardless of the degree of intrusion, whereas among those with incomplete apices, 45.5% that had been moderately intruded remained vital. External resorption was encountered in 54.8% of the teeth. Loss of marginal bone support was rarely encountered. Late complications included inflammatory root resorption in teeth with closed apices, in which endodontic treatment was not initially performed, and obliteration of the pulp tissue in teeth that remained vital. The results show that this method is superior to other treatment alternatives.
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ranking = 4
keywords = resorption
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19/42. A novel multidisciplinary approach for the treatment of an intruded immature permanent incisor.

    The optimal treatment for intruded permanent teeth has not yet been determined. The ideal treatment option is the one with the lowest probability of developing complications such as external root resorption and marginal bone loss. Each case should be considered individually, bearing in mind the severity of the intrusion, the stage of root development, and tooth mobility. Management of an intruded permanent tooth may consist of: (1) observation for spontaneous eruption; (2) surgical crown uncovering; (3) orthodontic extrusion (with or without prior luxation of the intruded tooth); (4) and partial surgical extrusion, immediately followed by orthodontic extrusion and surgical repositioning. The purpose of this article was to review the treatment options for intruded immature permanent incisors, and to present a new modality of an elective internal strengthening of the immature root weakened by external root resorption. A case of an intrusive luxation injury in a 7 1/2-year-old child and the resulting complications utilizing this technique is described. This is the first known report in the pediatric dentistry literature of performing an elective (preventive) internal strengthening of an immature root weakened by severe external inflammatory resorption. The child was followed for 5 years with an excellent clinical outcome. This technique should be considered for treatment of immature permanent teeth with thin cervical root dentin and external or internal root resorption due to trauma or caries.
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ranking = 4
keywords = resorption
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20/42. Orthodontic treatment of a traumatically intruded tooth with ankylosis by traction after surgical luxation.

    This report presents the treatment of a patient with anterior crossbite and displacement of ankylosed maxillary and mandibular right lateral incisors. The maxillary lateral incisor, which was traumatically intruded, was successfully treated with 2 surgical luxations followed by orthodontic traction. The mandibular lateral incisor, which was avulsed and replanted, experienced replacement root resorption during orthodontic treatment and was ultimately extracted. Two years after active orthodontic treatment, the occlusal results were considered satisfactory.
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ranking = 1
keywords = resorption
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