Cases reported "Tooth Avulsion"

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21/96. Complete tooth extraction: a case report.

    Advanced Trauma and life Support protocol is used in trauma situations to identify life-threatening injuries, and after those are addressed, it provides a systematic approach to identify minor injuries. A 17-year-old male, who was involved in a motor vehicle accident, was treated for an open toe fracture. He also had an "avulsion injury" to his left hand and was missing a tooth. On follow-up two days later, he was found to have a tooth in his left hand after he presented with cellulitis of a hand wound. He was appropriately treated with foreign body removal, incision and drainage, and antibiotics. This case is not only presented for being unique but also to emphasize the importance of the secondary survey and serial examinations instructed by Advanced Trauma and life Support.
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22/96. Reposition of intruded permanent incisor by a combination of surgical and orthodontic approach: a case report.

    This report presents a case of a completely intrusive luxation of an immature permanent central incisor in a 7 years 9 months-old girl. Because there are severe intrusive trauma and cortical alveolar bone fracture, it was impossible to reposition with orthodontic or surgical method alone. The intruded tooth was repositioned to healthy alveolar bone level by using surgical extrusion and stabilization with sutures and periodontal pack. After healing of adjacent bone, the intruded maxillary central incisor erupted orthodontically by removable orthodontic appliance. It was moved from a high position to level of adjacent tooth in about 7 months. A radiograph was taken 6 months after ceasing forced eruption, which demonstrated minor root resorption, but the alveolar bone height had increased.
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23/96. A two-probe laser Doppler flowmetry assessment as an exclusive diagnostic device in a long-term follow-up of traumatised teeth: a case report.

    The reliability of laser Doppler flowmetry in a two-probe assessment of pulpal blood flow is well known. The purpose of this case report was to determine its use as an exclusive and reliable tool for tooth vitality diagnosis in a long-term follow-up. As a result of a traumatic injury to a 24-year-old Caucasian female, tooth pulp vitality was studied in six maxillary front teeth over 30 weeks using two-probe laser Doppler flowmetry and current sensitivity tests. A similar assessment was repeated after 228 weeks. Confronted with an alveolar bone fracture with a tooth in the fracture line, one intrusion and several luxated teeth, current sensitivity tests are found not to be as reliable indicators of revascularisation, as significant results are obtained later (7 weeks) than using laser Doppler flowmetry tests (1 week). A pathway with ischaemia (3 weeks), hyperaemia (7 weeks) and restored blood supply in the pulp measured by laser Doppler flowmetry tests was found and avoided endodontic treatment. Teeth vascularisation evolved normally (228 weeks). Despite a strong indication in all sensitivity tests for endodontic treatment, the use of laser Doppler flowmetry tests was clear, more reliable than sensitivity tests and exclusive, as denervation was postponed and pulp vascularisation evident.
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24/96. Delayed removal of a fully intruded primary incisor through the nasal cavity: a case report.

    Complete intrusion of a primary anterior tooth may initially be diagnosed as an avulsion injury. The importance of a correct first clinical and radiological examination of a young patient who has sustained trauma to the anterior primary teeth is stressed in this article. This issue is illustrated by a case presentation where a 3-year-old girl had a delayed treatment of 5 days after a primary incisor was fully impacted by a fall trauma into the nasal cavity. This was due to an incomprehensible clinical and radiological examination by the first examining dentist. The impacted tooth was later removed through the right nostril under general anesthesia. Two-year follow-up showed no adverse clinical or radiological problems even though eruption of the permanent successor had not taken place at that time.
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25/96. The treatment of an avulsed maxillary central incisor by transplantation of an embedded mandibular premolar.

    Avulsion, following traumatic injuries, is relatively infrequent. The treatment of avulsed teeth is by replantation of the avulsed tooth into its own socket. However, sometimes the avulsed tooth cannot be found at the accident site. We report a case in which the avulsed maxillary central incisor is replaced by an embedded lower premolar. A 2-year follow-up shows complete periodontal healing and a very satisfactory clinical result.
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26/96. Obliteration of pulp canal space after concussion and subluxation: endodontic considerations.

    Concussion and subluxation injuries to permanent teeth lead to obliteration of the pulp canal space in 3% to 11% of cases, depending on the severity of the injury and the developmental stage of the tooth. Obliteration of the pulp canal space may make root canal treatment necessary because of the development of apical periodontitis or for cosmetic reasons. If carefully executed, root canal treatment in teeth with an obliterated pulp canal space is highly successful and may act as a basis for internal bleaching.
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27/96. Maxillary bone growth and implant positioning in a young patient: a case report.

    The literature supports the efficacy of osseointegrated implants for partially edentulous patients, but care must be exercised in adolescents with incomplete bone formation. Implants do not follow the normal growth of the jaws, and they behave like ankylosed teeth. They may also interfere with the normal growth of the alveolar process and jeopardize the germs of the adjacent permanent teeth or alter eruption. This case report analyzes the unfavorable clinical and radiographic findings of a single-tooth replacement in a young male over a 15-year period.
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28/96. Healing of root resorption: a case report.

    External resorption is sequelae of necrotic periodontal membrane over a large area of root following an injury to the tooth. This usually occurs after severe dental injuries such as intrusion, severe luxations or exarticulation injuries complicated by a prolonged extra oral period. This case report presents a clinical and radiographic follow up (13 months) of treatment of inflammatory external root resorption on maxillary central incisor using Vitapex. Gradual healing of resorption was observed radiographically with no tenderness or pathological mobility.
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29/96. External inflammatory and replacement resorption of luxated, and avulsed replanted permanent incisors: a review and case presentation.

    External inflammatory resorption and replacement resorption are complicating factors that may result from traumatic dental injuries when the tooth is luxated or avulsed and replanted. Resorption may, ultimately, result in loss of the tooth. However, with appropriate treatment, the prognosis for these teeth is greatly improved, with the possibility of preventing or arresting resorption. The purpose of this paper is to review these trauma entities, to discuss factors that influence the occurrence of resorption and to describe the most appropriate treatment. A case is presented, illustrating both resorption entities, but with varying outcomes.
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30/96. Replanting avulsed primary teeth.

    tooth replantation is a viable procedure if performed under the following acceptable guidelines: Replant the tooth if time lapse is less than 30 minutes (a time lapse of more than one to two hours results in a poor prognosis); Transport the tooth or teeth in milk, saliva or blood; and Keep teeth and replant area clean to minimize infection. Quick action by the mother in bringing the child to the hospital emergency room was a vital first step. The fact that the child held the teeth in her mouth en route to the hospital--bathed in saliva and blood, still attached by the bit of gingival tissue in the warm mouth's environment--helped to contribute to a positive situation as well as did the good home care.
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