Cases reported "Tooth Erosion"

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1/65. A case report: recognizing factitious injuries secondary to multiple eating disorders.

    This report describes the uncommon problem of a female patient diagnosed with an eating disorder, bulimia nervosa, who reported self-mutilating dental factitious behavior. The case presents a serious diagnostic and management problem. Notwithstanding the clinical appearance of the dentition, a thorough medical-dental history was essential for this uncommon diagnosis.
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2/65. Restoration of enamel and dentin erosion due to gastroesophageal reflux disease: a case report.

    gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a condition where acid contents of the stomach are regurgitated into the oral cavity, which results in continual exposure of the teeth to these acids. knowledge of the relationship between GERD and dental erosion enables the appropriate diagnosis and treatment of the underlying medical condition as well as the affected teeth. This article details a case report where severe dental erosion was present due to GERD. After management of the disease, treatment (i.e., diagnosis, treatment planning, and restoration) of the eroded dentition is described.
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3/65. Dental erosion: diagnostic-based noninvasive treatment.

    Lesions that result from dental erosion can be difficult to recognize--particularly when abrasion and attrition are also present. Consequently, dental erosion is often misdiagnosed and mistreated by radical restorative modalities that compromise the vitality of the pulp. This article provides clinicians with knowledge concerning the diagnosis of the complex lesions of dental wear and demonstrates the conservative treatment of this condition. Two cases that exhibit marked tooth wear in anterior teeth and their subsequent restoration utilizing occlusal principles and composite resin are presented.
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4/65. Syndromes with salivary dysfunction predispose to tooth wear: case reports of congenital dysfunction of major salivary glands, Prader-Willi, congenital rubella, and Sjogren's syndromes.

    Four cases-of congenital dysfunction of the major salivary glands as well as of Prader-Willi, congenital rubella, and Sjogren's syndromes-were identified in a series of 500 patients referred for excessive tooth wear. Although there was evidence of consumption of highly acidic drinks, some occlusal parafunction, and unacceptable toothbrushing habits, salivary dysfunction was the salient factor predisposing a patient to tooth wear in these syndromal cases. The 500 subjects have been characterized either as having medical conditions and medications that predispose them to xerostomia or lifestyles in which workplace- and sports-related dehydration lead to reduced salivary flow. Normal salivation, by buffering capacity, clearance by swallowing, pellicle formation, and capacity for remineralization of demineralized enamel, protects the teeth from extrinsic and intrinsic acids that initiate dental erosion. Thus, the syndromes, unrelated in many respects, underline the importance of normal salivation in the protection of teeth against tooth wear by erosion, attrition, and abrasion.
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5/65. Oral rehabilitation of a bulimic patient: a case report.

    bulimia nervosa is among the most common health problems in contemporary society. It is a self-induced weight loss syndrome associated with distinct dental manifestations involving physical and psychologic symptoms. It is characterized by recurrent binge-purge episodes that occur at least once a day. This article describes the complete-mouth rehabilitation of a bulimic patient with a generalized enamel erosion of her dentition and a poor esthetic appearance. Porcelain-fused-to-metal restorations were used as the definitive treatment. Good esthetics and high self-esteem were the final results. Comprehensive restorative therapy was applied in this clinical case report to achieve both function and esthetics in a demanding situation.
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keywords = dental
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6/65. Rapid general dental erosion by gas-chlorinated swimming pool water. review of the literature and case report.

    Several reports indicate an increased prevalence of dental erosion among intensive swimmers due to low pH gas-chlorinated pool water. Contrary to other extrinsic factors which induce erosion located on the facial aspect, low pH pool water results in general dental erosion. Additionally, a case report is presented which describes the very rapid occurrence of excessive general dental erosion of a competitive swimmer due to gas-chlorinated pool water within 27 days. The observation of several authors as well as this case underscore the significance of a regular pH monitoring of chlorinated swimming pool water. The high incidence indicates that dental erosion due to frequent swimming is of considerable diagnostic and therapeutic significance. Furthermore, it is recommended to fluoridate the teeth of intensive swimmers regularly to prevent dental erosion.
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ranking = 4.5
keywords = dental
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7/65. Dental erosion: a case study of a marathon runner.

    This paper presents a case study of a recreational runner who unwittingly has caused severe damage to her dentition through her lifestyle and dietary habits. It should serve as a reminder to all dental practitioners that dental problems occur even in patients who seem to be following a healthy lifestyle.
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8/65. Dental erosion caused by silent gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    BACKGROUND: gastroesophageal reflux disease, or GERD, is a relatively common condition, in which stomach acid may be refluxed up through the esophagus and into the oral cavity, resulting in enamel erosion. Symptoms such as belching, unexplained sour taste and heartburn usually alert the patient to the condition. In silent GERD, however, these symptoms do not occur, and enamel erosion of the posterior dentition may be the first indication of GERD. CASE DESCRIPTION: A 30-year-old man came to a dental clinic with enamel erosion on the occlusal surfaces of his posterior teeth and the palatal surfaces of his maxillary anterior teeth. He reported no history of gastrointestinal disease or heartburn. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Enamel erosion may be a clinical sign of silent GERD that allows the dentist to make the initial diagnosis. Referral to a physician or gastroenterologist is necessary to define the diagnosis; however, dental expertise may be essential in distinguishing between differential diagnoses such as bulimia, attrition and abrasion. Successful treatment of this medical condition is necessary before dental rehabilitation can be initiated successfully.
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ranking = 1.5
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9/65. Rehabilitation of a bulimic patient using endosteal implants.

    This article describes the dental rehabilitation of a bulimic patient using endosteal implants. Although the patient, a 31-year-old woman with a long history of bulimia nervosa, had been receiving medical and psychological treatment, the condition was not completely controlled. Clinical examination revealed multiple crowns with extensive cervical caries. The prognosis for all remaining teeth was poor. After extractions, implant therapy was implemented to provide support for fixed prostheses. After the implants were uncovered and during provisional therapy, the peri-implant tissue exhibited inflammation and lack of keratinized tissue requiring additional periodontal procedures before definitive restorations could be placed. Because of the difficulty in managing the peri-implant tissue during the many phases of implant therapy, treatment was challenging. One year after treatment, the patient's low self-esteem had improved substantially and her restorations provided satisfactory esthetics and function.
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keywords = dental
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10/65. Diagnosis and dental treatment of a young adult patient with gastroesophageal reflux: a case report with 2-year follow-up.

    A young adult who complained of extreme dentin sensitivity to tactile and thermal stimuli exhibited severe, generalized tooth erosion and an associated parafunctional habit. The diagnosis of the underlying general disease and treatment of its dental sequelae are presented, together with a 2-year follow up. patients who are suspected of having gastroesophageal reflux should be referred to a gastroenterologist or other health professionals to ensure early diagnosis and treatment of the underlying disorder, thus minimizing the destruction of the patient's dentition and improving the patient's general health. Dental treatment should be adjusted to fit the characteristics of each case.
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ranking = 2.5
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