Cases reported "Tooth Erosion"

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1/24. Dental erosion and aspirin headache powders: a clinical report.

    The causes of tooth erosion are varied, but all are associated with a chemical attack on the teeth and resulting loss of tooth structure. Etiologic factors related to erosion cited in the literature include bulimia, eating acidic foods, soft drink consumption, acid reflux, and swimming, among others. This clinical report suggests that chronic use of headache powders can also be a factor leading to tooth erosion.
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2/24. Restoration of enamel and dentin erosion due to gastroesophageal reflux disease: a case report.

    gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a condition where acid contents of the stomach are regurgitated into the oral cavity, which results in continual exposure of the teeth to these acids. knowledge of the relationship between GERD and dental erosion enables the appropriate diagnosis and treatment of the underlying medical condition as well as the affected teeth. This article details a case report where severe dental erosion was present due to GERD. After management of the disease, treatment (i.e., diagnosis, treatment planning, and restoration) of the eroded dentition is described.
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3/24. Syndromes with salivary dysfunction predispose to tooth wear: case reports of congenital dysfunction of major salivary glands, Prader-Willi, congenital rubella, and Sjogren's syndromes.

    Four cases-of congenital dysfunction of the major salivary glands as well as of Prader-Willi, congenital rubella, and Sjogren's syndromes-were identified in a series of 500 patients referred for excessive tooth wear. Although there was evidence of consumption of highly acidic drinks, some occlusal parafunction, and unacceptable toothbrushing habits, salivary dysfunction was the salient factor predisposing a patient to tooth wear in these syndromal cases. The 500 subjects have been characterized either as having medical conditions and medications that predispose them to xerostomia or lifestyles in which workplace- and sports-related dehydration lead to reduced salivary flow. Normal salivation, by buffering capacity, clearance by swallowing, pellicle formation, and capacity for remineralization of demineralized enamel, protects the teeth from extrinsic and intrinsic acids that initiate dental erosion. Thus, the syndromes, unrelated in many respects, underline the importance of normal salivation in the protection of teeth against tooth wear by erosion, attrition, and abrasion.
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4/24. Dental erosion caused by silent gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    BACKGROUND: gastroesophageal reflux disease, or GERD, is a relatively common condition, in which stomach acid may be refluxed up through the esophagus and into the oral cavity, resulting in enamel erosion. Symptoms such as belching, unexplained sour taste and heartburn usually alert the patient to the condition. In silent GERD, however, these symptoms do not occur, and enamel erosion of the posterior dentition may be the first indication of GERD. CASE DESCRIPTION: A 30-year-old man came to a dental clinic with enamel erosion on the occlusal surfaces of his posterior teeth and the palatal surfaces of his maxillary anterior teeth. He reported no history of gastrointestinal disease or heartburn. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Enamel erosion may be a clinical sign of silent GERD that allows the dentist to make the initial diagnosis. Referral to a physician or gastroenterologist is necessary to define the diagnosis; however, dental expertise may be essential in distinguishing between differential diagnoses such as bulimia, attrition and abrasion. Successful treatment of this medical condition is necessary before dental rehabilitation can be initiated successfully.
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5/24. Case report: management of tooth tissue loss from intrinsic acid erosion.

    Acid erosive tooth wear is increasingly being reported in many western countries, and is also being recognised as a significant cause of tooth destruction in persons with xerostomia. The primary aetiology is related to a high consumption of dietary sources of acids and also to an increasing awareness of gastric acid as a significant factor in both children and adults. Recommended preventive dental treatments aim to neutralise the effects of acids, reduce the severity of xerostomia, stimulate salivary flow and buffering capacity, and increase the acid resistance of tooth substance. Initial restorative treatments should be conservative, using adhesive dentistry techniques. This treatment approach is illustrated by the oral rehabilitation of a severe erosion case using adhesive onlays, veneers and all ceramic crowns.
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6/24. gastroesophageal reflux disease, tooth erosion, and prosthodontic rehabilitation: a clinical report.

    gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a relatively common gastrointestinal disorder in the united states. The reflux of acid adversely affects the mucosal lining of the esophagus and is responsible for dental erosion. This article briefly reviews the etiology, risk factors, and medical management of GERD. The patient presentation describes the rehabilitation of a young adult with GERD who needed multidisciplinary care.
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7/24. Medicinal erosion: a case report.

    patients, healthcare professionals, and health product manufacturers focus on the benefits that the use of a medicine or health product will bring rather than the potential side effects. A case of erosive tooth surface loss caused by the repeated and prolonged use of an acidic mouthrinse is reported. The adverse effects of health care products on the dentition and methods to minimise potential damage are discussed.
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8/24. Dental erosion due to wine consumption.

    BACKGROUND: Dental erosions can result from numerous causes, but extrinsic dietary factors are the most common. Because of wine's acidity, it may have a deleterious effect on teeth. Its use must be considered during an evaluation of erosive dental changes. CASE DESCRIPTION: The author examined a 56-year-old woman because her referring dentist had noted extensive erosive loss of tooth structure, mainly enamel. The author eliminated the usual causes of dental erosion. It was only after a detailed history was obtained and dietary investigation was undertaken that the author determined that the amount, manner and timing of the patient's wine drinking was the cause of the problem. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: dentists should be aware that wine could be a cause of dental erosion. Early recognition negates progressive dental damage with its need for extensive dental restoration. Furthermore, because patients with wine-incited dental erosions consume large volumes of wine with its significant alcohol content, medical referral by the dentist for a liver assessment is indicated.
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9/24. Influence of drinking patterns of carbonated beverages on dental erosion.

    As a hard tissue dental disease, dental erosion has a multifactorial etiology. The majority of dental erosion that originates from extrinsic sources is the result of dietary intake, particularly acidic beverages. Several preventive means have been proposed to minimize the damage to the dentition, including a reduction in the consumption of causative beverages and the adoption of a specific method of drinking, utilizing a straw instead of a cup. This article presents two cases involving the clinical and radiographic features of erosion lesions associated with chronic and excessive intake of acidic carbonated beverages. These examples embody how drinking patterns influence the formation of erosion lesions in various anatomic locations within the dentition. The clinical and radiographic evidence presented in this report cautions against the use of nonspecific terms, such as "cup versus straw," and instead suggests implementing a more precise description of the suggested method. In view of the extensive damage inflicted by the chronic, excessive intake of carbonated beverages, preventive measures are considered to be the only effective course of management. This article offers illustrative examples of erosion lesions associated with long-term excessive intake of carbonated beverages. The influence of the drinking method--that is, a straw positioned into the labial vestibule versus a cup--on the anatomic location of the erosion lesions will be demonstrated through clinical and radiographic evidence.
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10/24. Restoring erosion associated with gastroesophageal reflux using direct resins: case report.

    gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a condition where stomach acids are chronically regurgitated into the esophagus and oral cavity, resulting in pathology, such as esophagitis, varices or ulcers. Continual exposure of the teeth to these acids can also cause severe dental erosion. This condition frequently is asymptomatic, and the only evident sign may be the irreversible erosion of tooth structure. The dentist often is the first health care professional to identify the affected dentition. knowledge of this cause and effect relationship between GERD and dental erosion will better prepare the practitioner to refer patients for appropriate diagnosis and treatment of the underlying medical condition and provide treatment for the affected teeth. This article presents a case report where dental erosion was present due to GERD. After management of the disease with medication, dental treatment of the eroded dentition is described, including diagnosis, treatment planning and restorative reconstruction.
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