Cases reported "Tooth Injuries"

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1/11. Apex formation during orthodontic treatment in an adult patient: report of a case.

    This clinical report describes an apexification procedure on a maxillary left central incisor in a 34-year-old male who was also receiving active orthodontic treatment. The pulp of the tooth had become necrotic following a traumatic injury when the patient was 8 years of age. Despite the tooth undergoing active orthodontic repositioning with fixed appliances, root-end closure occurred uneventfully and within 3 years.
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ranking = 1
keywords = pulp
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2/11. Bone-like tissue growth in the root canal of immature permanent teeth after traumatic injuries.

    Following a severe traumatic incident to permanent immature teeth, the growth of calcified tissue in the pulp space may occasionally occur. This calcified tissue may be diffuse or in intimate contact with the dentine. It has been suggested that a wide open apex, severe damage to the root sheath, and the absence of infection are only some of the predisposing factors leading to this metaplasia of pulp tissue into bone-like tissue. Five cases are described.
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ranking = 2
keywords = pulp
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3/11. Conservative management of an accidentally resected root: a 3-year follow-up.

    Despite all the effort by dentists to provide high levels of dental care in clinical practice, there is always the possibility of accidents occurring. This report describes a referred case that presented with irreversible pulpitis in tooth #19. The situation developed after accidental resectioning of the distal root of tooth #19 during the surgical extraction of tooth #18 by another dentist. The resultant open apex in the distal root of tooth #19 was managed conservatively. A positive apical stop was prepared at the root end of the distal root and sterile calcium hydroxide powder was used to create an apical barrier against which a gutta-percha filling was condensed. The treatment appeared successful at 3-year follow-up.
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ranking = 1
keywords = pulp
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4/11. Surgical repositioning of a developing maxillary permanent central incisor in a horizontal position: spontaneous eruption and root formation.

    This report describes the surgical repositioning of a developing maxillary permanent central incisor in a horizontal position, followed by spontaneous eruption and root formation without orthodontic traction. Surgical exposure of the right central incisor was achieved. A 7-year-old boy referred for orthodontic consultation. Radiographic examination showed the crown of a maxillary right central incisor to be positioned horizontally with root formation at the initial stage. The surgically repositioned incisor (by a close-eruption surgical flap technique) spontaneously erupted into correct alignment after 2 years 3 months. The erupted incisor remained vital and responded normally to percussion, mobility and sensitivity testing. The soft tissue, periodontal attachment, gingival contour and probing depths were normal. Follow-up radiographs confirmed the continued development of the root, with revascularization of the pulp and a normal appearance of the periodontal space and lamina dura. There was, however, shorter root formation and a narrower root cavity compared with the contralateral incisor. As a result, no orthodontic traction and alignment were required. This method of surgical repositioning is a viable alternative to the traditional approach of extraction or surgical exposure followed by orthodontic traction for a developing maxillary permanent central incisor in a horizontal position.
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ranking = 1.0006289453281
keywords = pulp, exposure
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5/11. Displacement and pulpal involvement of a maxillary incisor associated with a talon cusp: report of a case.

    The talon cusp is a relatively uncommon dental anomaly manifested as an accessory cusp-like structure on the crown of anterior teeth. The presence of a talon cusp can cause clinical problems. This article reports the case of a patient presenting a talon cusp affecting the permanent maxillary right central incisor causing clinical problems related to caries, displacement of the tooth, occlusal position and tendency to dental traumatism. The management of this tooth included caries removal and reduction of the cusp. Pulp-capping with calcium hydroxide was required because of the presence of pulp horn extensions in the talon cusp.
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ranking = 5
keywords = pulp
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6/11. Treatment of pulp floor and stripping perforation by mineral trioxide aggregate.

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) has been widely used to repair various kinds of tooth perforations, but its use for obturation of the entire root canal has not been reported. We report two cases of tooth perforation successfully repaired with MTA. The first patient was a 78-year-old male with calcified canal and pulp floor perforation in the left maxillary first premolar. After bypass of the calcified palatal canal, both buccal and palatal canals were filled with gutta percha, and the pulp floor perforation was repaired with MTA. Clinical success with no evident radicular lesion was found at the 18-month follow-up. The second patient was a 51-year-old female with a stripping perforation in a C-shaped root canal of the right mandibular second molar detected after removal of a post. Following root canal debridement and calcium hydroxide therapy to control inflammation at the stripping perforation site, apical and furcation bone healing were observed by radiographic examination. The stripping perforation was repaired by obturation of the entire C-shaped root canal with MTA. observation at the 9-month follow-up revealed bone healing without any clinical symptoms and signs. These cases suggest that MTA is an alternative root canal obturation material for treatment of stripping perforation in a C-shaped root canal and for repair of pulp floor perforation.
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ranking = 7
keywords = pulp
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7/11. Treatment of extraoral sinus tracts from traumatized teeth with apical periodontitis.

    When a draining lesion is encountered on the skin of the face, an endodontic origin should always be considered in differential diagnosis. Non-surgical endodontic therapy, sometimes complimented by surgery, or extraction are the choices for the treatment of these cases. Three cases of extraoral sinus tract on the chin caused by necrotic pulp of traumatized lower anterior teeth are presented. A paste consisting of calcium hydroxide and barium sulfate powder mixed with glycerin was used. Usage of calcium hydroxide paste was advocated for rapid and successful treatment of extraoral lesions communicating with necrotic teeth.
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ranking = 1
keywords = pulp
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8/11. dental pulp response to traumatic injuries--a retrospective analysis with case reports.

    The reactions of the dental pulp to traumatic injuries can be extremely varied. They range from almost immediate pulp death to long-term slow pulp canal calcification. In this study the pulpal reactions were divided into three types: pulps with a very poor prognosis that required endodontic therapy soon after the tooth was traumatized. Seventy-nine teeth were studied in this category, and all 79 teeth required endodontic therapy; pulps with a moderate prognosis that required endodontic intervention some 18 to 24 months after the traumatic episode. Forty-eight teeth were studied in this category, and 27 of them required endodontic therapy: pulps with a very good prognosis that rarely required endodontic therapy. Fifty-two teeth were studied in this category, and only 2 required endodontic therapy. The prognosis of a particular pulp depends on the degree and type of trauma.
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ranking = 45.777760050924
keywords = dental pulp, pulp
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9/11. Aesthetic treatment of discoloration of nonvital teeth.

    Attempts to treat discoloration in nonvital teeth were first reported a century ago. This article discusses two potential causes of nonvital tooth discoloration-trauma and endodontic treatment-along with a step-by-step clinical procedure for treatment of the discoloration. In trauma, hemoglobin is released into the tissues; iron oxides, formed by oxygen and iron in hemoglobin, cause discoloration and swelling that infringes on pulp space, forcing the pulp to recede with a potential loss of tooth vitality. After endodontic treatment, either hemorrhaging, materials used, or incomplete removal and breakdown of necrotic tissue may cause staining. The learning objective of this article is to review the causes and the prevention/treatment of discoloration in nonvital teeth.
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ranking = 2
keywords = pulp
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10/11. Gaining access through a calcified pulp chamber: a clinical challenge.

    dental pulp is prone to dystrophic mineralization; this mineralization can be so extensive that the entire root canal system is obliterated. As a result, root canal treatment can become a difficult if not impossible task. This article presents the endodontic management of a tooth with an obliterated pulp chamber and associated with a discharging sinus in a teenage patient. The role of a calcium hydroxide lining to induce mineralization and cause the obliteration of the pulpal space is also discussed.
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ranking = 7
keywords = pulp
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