Cases reported "Tooth Injuries"

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1/29. Unusual dental injuries following facial fractures: report of three cases.

    We report 3 cases of unusual dental injuries following facial fractures. The first patient sustained intrusion of a maxillary incisor into the nasal cavity following a mandibular fracture. The tooth dislocated into the pharynx and was found lodged in the piriform fossa during surgery. The second patient sustained intrusion of molars into the maxillary sinus following maxillary and mandibular fractures. His treatment was delayed due to life-threatening hemorrhage. The third case involved ingestion of multiple avulsed teeth into the alimentary tract following severe maxillofacial fractures. Although the diagnosis was made more than a week after the injury, the patient did not suffer any complications as a result of the dental avulsion. The aim of this report is to emphasize the possibility of associated dental injuries in patients with facial fractures. The trauma surgeon should be cognizant of the importance of carrying out a thorough intraoral examination during the initial evaluation. Any missing tooth should be considered as possibly displaced into other tissue compartments, and must be routinely searched for with x-rays of the skull, cervical spine, chest, and abdomen. If full intrusion injury is suspected, further diagnostic investigation with facial computed tomography scanning may be worth while.
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2/29. A case of dental mutilation.

    A case of ritual mutilation in a fourteen-year-old Ethiopian girl is described. When the girl was three years old she had frequent stomach problems. According to tribal tradition her illness was thought to arise from her mandibular primary canines and these teeth were removed by a medicine man. The extraction damaged the tooth germs of the succedaneous teeth and resulted in deformed permanent canines. This is the first report of a case of dental mutilation from ethiopia.
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3/29. Treatment of root perforation by intentional reimplantation: a case report.

    Intentional reimplantation is defined as a procedure in which an intentional tooth extraction is performed followed by reinsertion of the extracted tooth into its own alveolus. In this paper, intentional reimplantation is described and discussed as a treatment approach to root canal instrument separation in conjunction with root perforation. An 8-year follow-up case report is presented. The reimplanted tooth is now a fixed bridge abutment. Although successful in this case, the intentional reimplantation procedure should be considered a treatment of last resort, that is, when another treatment option is not viable for the treatment of root perforation/instrument retrieval.
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4/29. Apex formation during orthodontic treatment in an adult patient: report of a case.

    This clinical report describes an apexification procedure on a maxillary left central incisor in a 34-year-old male who was also receiving active orthodontic treatment. The pulp of the tooth had become necrotic following a traumatic injury when the patient was 8 years of age. Despite the tooth undergoing active orthodontic repositioning with fixed appliances, root-end closure occurred uneventfully and within 3 years.
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5/29. Furcation involvement in posterior teeth.

    This article presents two cases in which different treatments were used for mandibular molars with furcation lesions. In the first case, a conventional amputation treatment of the distal root was performed to save the mesial root as a terminal tooth, which was used as a partial denture abutment. The second case describes a relatively new technique in which a root perforation was filled with graft material (synthetic bioglass) and covered with a resorbable membrane to treat an iatrogenic furcation lesion adjacent to the mesial root. Twelve months after surgery, periapical radiographs of both treated cases showed increased bone density. Follow-up in both cases--30 months in the first case and 12 months in the second--showed no pathological recurrence or clinical dysfunction. Root amputation may provide an alternative to extraction in periodontally involved molars. Synthetic bone replacement materials combined with guided tissue regeneration may also help to correct osseous defects incurred by recent furcation perforations with associated bone loss.
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6/29. Repair of a root perforation with a resin-ionomer using an intentional replantation technique.

    The repair of a root perforation can be accomplished using different materials and techniques. When the defect is surgically inaccessible, the tooth can be carefully extracted, repaired extraorally, and placed back into the socket. This procedure, known as intentional replantation, is often a measure of last resort in an heroic effort to save a hopeless tooth. This case report describes the treatment of a tooth with an iatrogenic root perforation and the subsequent healing of the surrounding periodontium using an intentional replantation technique and resin-ionomer to repair the root defect.
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7/29. Conservative management of an accidentally resected root: a 3-year follow-up.

    Despite all the effort by dentists to provide high levels of dental care in clinical practice, there is always the possibility of accidents occurring. This report describes a referred case that presented with irreversible pulpitis in tooth #19. The situation developed after accidental resectioning of the distal root of tooth #19 during the surgical extraction of tooth #18 by another dentist. The resultant open apex in the distal root of tooth #19 was managed conservatively. A positive apical stop was prepared at the root end of the distal root and sterile calcium hydroxide powder was used to create an apical barrier against which a gutta-percha filling was condensed. The treatment appeared successful at 3-year follow-up.
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8/29. Traditional tooth bud gouging in a Ugandan family: a report involving three sisters.

    It has been reported in the literature that some rural populations of Sub-Saharan and Eastern africa and other isolated areas around the world, practise gouging or enucleation of primary tooth buds to cure childhood illnesses. The unerupted primary canine tooth bud is believed to be the cause of febrile illness, diarrhoea, and vomiting; prevalent in infants in these areas of the world. Tooth bud gouging has implications for the developing dentition, and is a potential risk to the health and life of the child. Reported prevalence ranges from 22%-90%. From the information in this case report, the practise of tooth bud gouging is no longer confined to rural areas and may well be performed by communities that have emigrated to the UK. The three sisters described, now resident in the UK, suffered tooth gouging in a city clinic in uganda. The damage caused to the primary and permanent dentition is described and treatment planning and options are suggested for each case to restore structure and function. Appropriate provision of healthcare and education could avoid the potential long-term damage to the health of the child and their developing dentition by the practise of tooth bud gouging, whether it occurs in the developing or developed world.
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9/29. Splinting of traumatized teeth with a new device: TTS (titanium Trauma Splint).

    Displacement injuries of permanent teeth are an increasing emergency in the dental office. Children and adolescents are particularly prone to dental trauma due to participation in risky activities. Repositioning or replantation with subsequent stabilization by a dental splint is the standard of care for most displaced or avulsed permanent teeth. Non-rigid fixation allowing physiologic tooth mobility has been shown to be desirable for periodontal healing. A flexible splint of short duration appears to reduce the risk of dentoalveolar ankylosis or external replacement resorption. Different splinting techniques are currently recommended for stabilization of repositioned or replanted teeth, including a wire-composite splint, an orthodontic bracket splint or a resin splint. Each splinting option has its specific advantages and shortcomings. This paper describes a new splinting technique which offers improved comfort and handling to the patient and dentist alike.
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10/29. Delayed removal of a fully intruded primary incisor through the nasal cavity: a case report.

    Complete intrusion of a primary anterior tooth may initially be diagnosed as an avulsion injury. The importance of a correct first clinical and radiological examination of a young patient who has sustained trauma to the anterior primary teeth is stressed in this article. This issue is illustrated by a case presentation where a 3-year-old girl had a delayed treatment of 5 days after a primary incisor was fully impacted by a fall trauma into the nasal cavity. This was due to an incomprehensible clinical and radiological examination by the first examining dentist. The impacted tooth was later removed through the right nostril under general anesthesia. Two-year follow-up showed no adverse clinical or radiological problems even though eruption of the permanent successor had not taken place at that time.
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