Cases reported "Tooth Loss"

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1/38. Leukocyte adhesion deficiency in a child with severe oral involvement.

    Leukocyte adhesion deficiency is a rare inherited defect of phagocytic function resulting from a lack of leukocyte cell surface expression of beta2 integrin molecules (CD11 and CD18) that are essential for leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cells and chemotaxis. A small number of patients with leukocyte adhesion deficiency-1 have a milder defect, with residual expression of CD18. These patients tend to survive beyond infancy; they manifest progressive severe periodontitis, alveolar bone loss, periodontal pocket formation, and partial or total premature loss of the primary and permanent dentitions. We report on a 13-year-old boy with moderate leukocyte adhesion deficiency-1 and severe prepubertal periodontitis. This case illustrates the need for the dentist to work closely with the pediatrician in the prevention of premature tooth loss and control of oral infection in these patients.
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2/38. Short and sticky options in the treatment of the partially dentate patient.

    As we move into the twenty-first century, patterns of dental disease in adults are changing. Surveys of adult dental health indicate that more people are keeping their teeth for longer in life. In many cases, the ravages of dental disease and the cumulative effect of a lifetime of restorative dentistry lead to gradual tooth loss. For many of these patients, restoration of a complete dentition may not be feasible nor desirable. In recent years, functionally oriented treatment planning has become acceptable in light of recent research findings. Using this approach, treatment efforts and resources are directed principally at retaining the 'strategic' part of the dentition in the long term, ie, the anterior and premolar teeth. This paper describes, with the aid of treated cases, a means of combining a shortened dental arch strategy with resin bonded bridgework. With the aid of recent research in this area of clinical practice, some suggestions as to the use of the technique are also described.
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3/38. Periodontal treatment of rapid progressive periodontitis in 2 siblings with Papillon-Lefevre syndrome: 15-year follow-up.

    AIMS: This paper reports the treatment of the periodontal component of the Papillon-Lefevre syndrome in 2 siblings (case A, born 1974; case B, born 1976). METHOD: The initial treatment, in 1982, consisted of extraction of all primary teeth, scaling and rootplaning of the erupted permanent teeth and systemic antibiotic therapy. During 15 years, continuous and intensive periodontal treatment consisted of chlorhexidine 0.2% rinses, bi-weekly professional prophylaxis, scaling and rootplaning or surgery if indicated. Systemic antibiotics often accompanied mechanical therapy after bacteriological analysis. RESULTS: In case A, a favourable number of permanent teeth could be maintained, but in case B, all permanent teeth were lost in spite of the intensive treatment. Darkfield microscopy at different intervals revealed high numbers of spirochetes and motile rods in both siblings. Only in case A were they temporarily reduced to zero after scaling and rootplaning combined with metronidazole. Anaerobic cultering revealed high numbers of actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (A.a) in both patients. In 1994, 2 years after combined amoxicillin/metronidazole therapy, no A.a could be detected in case A. In case B, A.a could still be detected and was found to be resistant to metronidazole. One year after extraction of all permanent teeth, could no A.a be detected in case B. CONCLUSION: Intensive periodontal treatment combined with antibiotic therapy was not able to prevent complete tooth loss in case B. In case A, the treatment was more effective, resulting in preserving a number of permanent teeth in a stable clinical situation. In these 2 cases, no attempt was made to create an edentulous period between the periodontally-diseased mixed dentition and the eruption of the remaining teeth, which may have contributed to treatment failure.
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keywords = tooth, eruption
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4/38. Expansile skeletal hyperphosphatasia: a new familial metabolic bone disease.

    We describe a new familial metabolic bone disease characterized by expanding hyperostotic long bones, early onset deafness, premature tooth loss, and episodic hypercalcemia. The condition affects a mother and daughter studied at the age of 36 years and 11 years, respectively. Both individuals lost all hearing in early childhood and suffered premature shedding of teeth. Skeletal pains began just before puberty. Swelling and aching of most middle phalanges in the hands is an especially troublesome manifestation. The mother also had episodes of symptomatic hypercalcemia first documented in late childhood and subsequently during intercurrent illness and postpartum lactation. Radiographs show hyperostosis and/or osteosclerosis predominantly in the skull and appendicular skeleton. Long bones also are expanded considerably, especially the middle phalanges in the fingers. The mother's skeletal abnormalities are more severe. Biochemical parameters of bone turnover, including serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, are elevated substantially. In the proposita, dynamic histomorphometry of nondecalcified sections of iliac crest revealed rapid skeletal remodeling. In the mother, who had been treated with bisphosphonates, electron microscopy (EM) showed disorganized collagen bundles as well as necrotic and apoptotic bone cells but no osteocytic osteolysis. measles virus gene transcripts were not detected in peripheral blood monocytes. karyotyping was normal, 46,XX. Hyperphosphatasia with bone disease previously has been reported as either a sporadic or autosomal recessive condition. Expansile skeletal hyperphosphatasia (ESH) is probably inherited as an autosomal dominant trait with a high degree of penetrance.
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5/38. Early tooth loss due to cyclic neutropenia: long-term follow-up of one patient.

    In young patients with abnormal loosening of teeth and periodontal breakdown, dental professionals should consider a wide range of etiological factors/diseases, analyze differential diagnoses, and make appropriate referrals. The long-term oral and dental follow-up of a female patient diagnosed in early infancy with cyclic neutropenia is reviewed, and recommendations for care are discussed.
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6/38. Ehlers-Danlos type VIII. review of the literature.

    Ehlers-Danlos type VIII is a rare disorder characterized by soft, hyperextensible skin, abnormal scarring, easy bruising, and generalized periodontitis with early loss of teeth. To illustrate the clinical dermatological and dental features, we present the case history of a 20-year-old patient who has suffered from poor healing of wounds at the shins and knees since childhood, which have developed into hyperpigmented atrophic scars. In the course of orthodontic treatment during the last 3 years, severe apical root resorption, gingival recession, and loss of alveolar bone were observed. family history was noncontributory for any skin or tooth disorders. The typical clinical signs confirmed the diagnosis of ehlers-danlos syndrome type VIII. As there is no specific treatment for the disorder, management is limited to the symptomatic treatment of the dental disease. It seems advisable to consider carefully the indications for orthodontic treatment in patients with Ehlers-Danlos type VIII syndrome.
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7/38. Autogenous tooth transplantation: an alternative to dental implant placement?

    Autogenous tooth transplantation, or autotransplantation, is the surgical movement of a tooth from one location in the mouth to another in the same individual. Once thought to be experimental, autotransplantation has achieved high success rates and is an excellent option for tooth replacement. Although the indications for autotransplantation are narrow, careful patient selection coupled with an appropriate technique can lead to exceptional esthetic and functional results. One advantage of this procedure is that placement of an implant-supported prosthesis or other form of prosthetic tooth replacement is not needed. This article highlights the indications for autogenous tooth transplantation using 3 case reports as examples. A review of the recommended surgical technique as well as success rates are also discussed.
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8/38. The resin retained natural tooth pontic: a transitional esthetic solution.

    This case report presents an alternative treatment option for the premature loss of a maxillary anterior tooth due to severe periodontitis. A natural tooth pontic acid-etch prosthesis was fabricated using the patient's clinical crown from the extracted tooth. This measure proved to be a very adequate, esthetic treatment solution before a permanent restorative plan could be developed for the patient's long term dental needs.
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9/38. Occlusal reconstruction of a collapsed bite by orthodontic treatment, pre-prosthetic surgery and implant supported prostheses. A case report.

    The loss of mandibular molars can result in a 'collapsed bite' owing to tilting of teeth adjacent to the gap and overeruption of maxillary molar segments. The lost interarch and interdental space must be regained before prosthetic reconstruction. This case report documents the treatment of a patient by orthodontic, surgical and prosthetic means. The teeth were orthodontically aligned to meet predetermined surgical and prosthetic requirements. The surgical phase comprised a posterior segmental maxillary osteotomy and one-stage placement of three large-diameter implants in the mandible. Finally, the occlusion was restored with mandibular implant-supported prostheses.
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keywords = eruption
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10/38. Failure of resin ionomers in the retention of multi-rooted teeth with Class III furcation involvement: a rebuttal case report.

    BACKGROUND: Severe periodontal furcation invasion has long been a treatment dilemma for the clinician. Many techniques have been advocated in the treatment of multi-rooted posterior teeth ranging from conventional scaling and root planing (SRP), apically positioned flaps, root amputations, root resections, tunnel procedures, guided tissue regeneration, and restorations. The keys to success depend on the clinician's ability to access the furcation to remove local factors and create an environment that enhances the patient's own hygiene efforts. Long-term success in treating teeth with furcation invasion depends upon tooth retention and arresting the destructive processes within the furcation area. methods: A Class III furcation invasion in a mandibular molar was treated by surgical access for SRP along with obliterating the furcation utilizing a resin ionomer restoration. RESULTS: Initially, the patient was asymptomatic. Within 3 months of treatment, the patient presented with suppuration that was refractory to local efforts. Radiographs taken only 5 months postsurgery demonstrated advanced bone loss apical to the restoration. The tooth ultimately was extracted because mobility increased and the tooth became symptomatic. CONCLUSIONS: The clinician must consider the multi-factorial etiology of periodontal breakdown within a furcation. For this patient, the technique of sealing off the exposed furcation with restorative material appeared to have resulted in progressive bone loss and accelerate tooth loss. This single case report is presented as a rebuttal to recently published articles, which have demonstrated excellent results when treating furcations with ionomer restorations.
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