Cases reported "Tooth Migration"

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1/24. Subgingival plaque and loss of attachment in periodontosis as observed in autopsy material.

    Histologic sections from six autopsy cases which from a clinical point of view fitted into the criteria of periodontosis were examined with the aim at evaluating the role of subgingival plaque in the etiology of the loss of attachment in this condition. The following pertinent observations were made: 1. The subgingival plaque in most instances was not calcified to form calculus. 2. The thickness of the subgingival plaque varied between 20 and 200 mu (0.02-0.2 mm). 3. Where loss of attachment had taken place, the distance from the most apical part of the subgingival plaque to the most apical point of the epithelial cuff varied between 0.2 and 1.1 mm; this distance was never found to be more than 1.1 mm. This would indicate a cause and effect relationship, the plaque being the obvious cause. 4. There was very severe chronic inflammation in the soft tissue bordering upon the plaque with resulting collagenolysis. 5. The cellular infiltration and the collagenolysis may be limited to a zone of 1 to 2 mm in the immediate vicinity of the plaque. Between the inflamed area and the surface of the gingivae buccally and lingually there may be a fairly wide zone of healthy tissue which hides the symptoms of inflammation from being observed on a clinical examination. In turn this could leave the clinician with the impression that attachment has been lost and bone resorbed because of degenerative changes. The following conclusions can be made: In these six cases of "alveolar bone loss vastly out of proportion to what one would expect from the local etiologic factors in the patient at that age" there was no morphologic evidence that degenerative changes were responsible for the loss of attachment. On the contrary inflammatory changes induced by the subgingval plaque dominated the histopathologic picture.
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keywords = gingival
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2/24. The influence of transseptal fibers on incisor position and diastema formation.

    Transseptal fibers are a part of the gingival group of fibers of the periodontal membrane, and they are very tough and resistant. They form a chain from tooth to tooth which, provided that it remains intact and is sufficiently strong to resist displacing muscular pressures, will preserve the contacts between the teeth throughout the arch. If the continuity of the chain is interrupted, the balance of the forces acting upon the teeth on either side of the break is upset and considerable displacements can occur. Maxillary median diastemas are classified as "simple" or "persistent" according to their etiology, and an operation to clear the upper midline suture of transeptal fibers is described as an essential part of the treatment of persistent upper median diastema.
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ranking = 0.125
keywords = gingival
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3/24. Second premolars: a review and case report of two impaction cases.

    A variety of dental findings may present in the second premolar region. This is a report of the management of two patients who presented with impacted premolars. "Fives do fight for their lives".
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ranking = 0.0039796164997507
keywords = dental
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4/24. Drug-induced gingival overgrowth: a case with auto-correction of incisor drifting.

    Drug-induced gingival overgrowth is an iatrogenic clinical condition, which affects a proportion of patients medicated for conditions such as hypertension, epilepsy and the prevention of organ transplant rejection. Clinical manifestation can vary in severity from minor problems to complete coverage of the standing teeth. Drifting of teeth can also occur, producing further aesthetic and functional problems for the patient. This report documents a case of a renal transplant patient in whom drifting of the upper incisor teeth spontaneously resolved following surgical reduction of the overgrown gingivae. Clinical issues relating to the management of gingival overgrowth are also discussed.
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ranking = 0.75
keywords = gingival
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5/24. Pathologic migration--spontaneous correction following periodontal therapy: a case report.

    Periodontal disease is often associated with pathologic migration, which becomes an esthetic concern. A 17-year-old girl developed increasing gaps among her maxillary incisors. She had gingival enlargement in the palatal maxillary anterior region. The central incisors had pathologically migrated, resulting in a 2-mm diastema. Periodontal treatment was planned and completed. Following periodontal treatment, there was "spontaneous" repositioning of the central incisors. The 6-month follow-up revealed no change or deterioration of the periodontal condition. The patient was referred for orthodontic closure of the remaining diastema between the central and lateral incisors.
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ranking = 0.125
keywords = gingival
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6/24. Orthodontic movement into bone defects augmented with bovine bone mineral and fibrin sealer: a reentry case report.

    Periodontal disease can lead to migration of anterior teeth with the presence of infrabony defects. This creates the opportunity for treating such patients with a combined orthodontic-periodontic treatment. In the presented clinical case, an adult periodontal patient with extrusion of the maxillary central incisors and an infrabony defect on their lingual aspects was treated. During the surgical procedure, the bone defects were augmented with a combination of porous bovine bone mineral (Bio-Oss) and a fibrin-fibronectin sealing system (Tissucol). Ten days after surgery, the active orthodontic treatment started, and the teeth were intruded and realigned, moving the roots into the defects. After 6 months, the orthodontic appliances were removed and the teeth were retained by means of a resin-bonded splint. At this time, reduction in probing pocket depth and gingival recession was detected. Twelve months after the initial surgery, a reentry procedure was performed, showing complete filling of the predisposing defects with the presence of bone-like hard tissue. These clinical results suggest that teeth can be successfully moved and intruded into bone defects previously augmented with bovine bone substitute and fibrin glue. During the orthodontic treatment, this combined augmentation material was able to be replaced by bone-like hard tissue. At the end of the therapy, an improvement in esthetics and periodontal health status was registered.
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ranking = 0.125
keywords = gingival
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7/24. Bilateral maxillary fourth molars and a supernumerary tooth in maxillary canine region--a case report.

    The occurrence of supernumerary teeth is a relatively uncommon dental anomaly. The aetiology is not clear. Supernumerary teeth have frequently been observed as solitary teeth and impacted in the maxillary arch. This case report describes the rare presence of bilateral maxillary fourth molars and a supernumerary tooth in the maxillary canine region. On the left side, the third molar was extracted first, allowing the fourth molar to move into a more favourable position for later extraction. Two-year postoperative radiography confirmed that the supernumerary tooth had migrated occlusally and mesially permitting a safer extraction procedure.
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ranking = 0.0039796164997507
keywords = dental
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8/24. Ectopic eruption of a maxillary canine following trauma.

    Traumatic events at an early age may lead to developmental dental anomalies and ectopic tooth eruption. A case is reported in which a traumatic injury at two months of age resulted in the development of supernumerary teeth in the upper right premaxillary region. The maxillary canine ectopically erupted or transposed into the space left by the missing central incisor and eliminated the need for a prosthesis in this region.
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ranking = 0.0039796164997507
keywords = dental
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9/24. Migrating third molar: a report of a case.

    Pathologic migration is an abnormal change in the position of a tooth within the dental arch. There are many etiologic factors associated with this phenomenon, but the exact cause is often difficult to diagnose. The following is a report of a 42-year-old man exhibiting a unique form of bilateral migration of his mandibular third molars. He was asymptomatic and unaware of this occurrence. The morbidity to remove these teeth was deemed too great to justify extraction. biopsy of the overlying tissue associated with a left-impacted third molar revealed no significant pathologic process other than inflammation and some hyperplasia within the dental follicle. Histologic-radiographic correlation was inconclusive in determining whether epithelium from pericoronal soft tissue involving the right third molar was from a hyperplastic dental follicle or a small dentigerous cyst. It is speculated that the ultimate cause of the migration of the third molars was severe, aggressive periodontal disease of the adjacent molars.
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ranking = 0.011938849499252
keywords = dental
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10/24. Canine ectopia: report of two cases.

    Transmigration of mandibular canine is a rare elusive phenomenon described in dental literature. The eruption of such transmigrated canines is even rarer. Two rare cases one of midline mandibular canine and the other of transmigrated mandibular canine across the midline and erupted distal to the opposite lateral incisor are presented. The transmigrated canine maintained its nerve supply from the original site. It is suggested that on routine evaluation of orthopantomograms when the dentist finds an excessive mesial inclination of the unerupted mandibular canine at 8-9 years associated with proclination of lower anteriors. increased axial inclination of the unerupted canine and an enlarged symphyseal cross section area of the chin, it is best to keep such a patient under routine evaluation.
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ranking = 0.0039796164997507
keywords = dental
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