Cases reported "Tooth Migration"

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1/31. Regaining space by using elastic orthodontic separators.

    When an extensive carious lesion is present, interproximal space may be lost due to drifting of adjacent teeth. This may encroach upon the space needed to restore the tooth to proper occlusal and interproximal contours. Although the space may be regained with conventional orthodontics, this may not be an option in some cases due to financial or technical considerations. The outlined clinical technique uses elastic orthodontic separators in conjunction with an incrementally modified acrylic crown to regain lost interproximal space. The results of this technique were achieved rapidly and allowed for the placement of a physiologically contoured restoration. This procedure is technically simple, provides quick results, and is less expensive for the patient than conventional orthodontics.
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2/31. Atypical migration of an impacted lower third molar.

    This report describes the atypical migration of an impacted lower third molar tooth in a 42-year-old woman. Serial radiographs showed that, over a period of 13 years, the tooth migrated from its original disto-angular position posterior to and beneath the roots of the adjacent second molar to a more horizontal position beneath the roots of the first permanent molar. The tooth was surgically removed under general anaesthesia, with biopsy and curettage of soft tissue found in the bone posterior to the tooth along the path of migration. This pattern of tooth movement is highly unusual in an adult patient.
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3/31. The influence of transseptal fibers on incisor position and diastema formation.

    Transseptal fibers are a part of the gingival group of fibers of the periodontal membrane, and they are very tough and resistant. They form a chain from tooth to tooth which, provided that it remains intact and is sufficiently strong to resist displacing muscular pressures, will preserve the contacts between the teeth throughout the arch. If the continuity of the chain is interrupted, the balance of the forces acting upon the teeth on either side of the break is upset and considerable displacements can occur. Maxillary median diastemas are classified as "simple" or "persistent" according to their etiology, and an operation to clear the upper midline suture of transeptal fibers is described as an essential part of the treatment of persistent upper median diastema.
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4/31. The use of orthodontic intrusive movement to reduce infrabony pockets in adult periodontal patients: a case report.

    Clinicians often encounter osseous defects that are best treated by conventional surgical techniques, including bone grafting and guided tissue regeneration, with a goal of establishing a new connective tissue attachment. On occasion, the recognition of an infrabony defect proximal to a tooth with a large diastema may present an opportunity to consider resolution by orthodontic tooth movement. Ideally, the tooth could be moved in the proximal direction until there was no further radiographic or clinical evidence of the predisposing defect. The authors decided to treat an advanced case of adult periodontitis, with extrusion and migration of a maxillary central incisor, using a multidisciplinary approach. Radiologically, a large infrabony defect was present on the mesial aspect of the incisor, with an initial probing depth of 9 mm. After the surgical periodontal therapy, the orthodontic movement started and the incisor was repositioned using an intrusive mechanism, also leading to the closure of the diastema. At the end of the treatment, there was a significant clinical decrease in the probing depth values, and radiographs showed a remarkable reduction of the infrabony defect volume.
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5/31. Bilateral maxillary fourth molars and a supernumerary tooth in maxillary canine region--a case report.

    The occurrence of supernumerary teeth is a relatively uncommon dental anomaly. The aetiology is not clear. Supernumerary teeth have frequently been observed as solitary teeth and impacted in the maxillary arch. This case report describes the rare presence of bilateral maxillary fourth molars and a supernumerary tooth in the maxillary canine region. On the left side, the third molar was extracted first, allowing the fourth molar to move into a more favourable position for later extraction. Two-year postoperative radiography confirmed that the supernumerary tooth had migrated occlusally and mesially permitting a safer extraction procedure.
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6/31. Surgical removal of a dislocated lower third molar from the condyle region: case report.

    INTRODUCTION: Migration of dislocated lower third molar into the condylar region is quite rare. attention should be taken to avoid condyle fracture. methods: 49-year-old patient had an ectopic lower left third molal in the condylar region, suffered from a submandibular and masseter space abscess. Removal of the molar via intraoral approach was chosen avoiding facial nerve branches and unnecessary scar formation. Coronoid process is removed, the tooth is separated and removed. The defect is filled with iliac cancellous bone. The coronoid process was fixed as a cover with a resorbable plate and screws (BIONX). RESULTS: Removal via intraoral approach is possible. hypesthesia existed postoperatively, became normal later. CONCLUSION: Annual observation is strongly recommended. Intraoral approach is superior to the extraoral approach. Removal of the coronoid process minimizes the masticator forces. Separation of the tooth is essential. Filling the defect with cancellous bone accelerates the healing.
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7/31. Ectopic eruption of a maxillary canine following trauma.

    Traumatic events at an early age may lead to developmental dental anomalies and ectopic tooth eruption. A case is reported in which a traumatic injury at two months of age resulted in the development of supernumerary teeth in the upper right premaxillary region. The maxillary canine ectopically erupted or transposed into the space left by the missing central incisor and eliminated the need for a prosthesis in this region.
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8/31. Migrating third molar: a report of a case.

    Pathologic migration is an abnormal change in the position of a tooth within the dental arch. There are many etiologic factors associated with this phenomenon, but the exact cause is often difficult to diagnose. The following is a report of a 42-year-old man exhibiting a unique form of bilateral migration of his mandibular third molars. He was asymptomatic and unaware of this occurrence. The morbidity to remove these teeth was deemed too great to justify extraction. biopsy of the overlying tissue associated with a left-impacted third molar revealed no significant pathologic process other than inflammation and some hyperplasia within the dental follicle. Histologic-radiographic correlation was inconclusive in determining whether epithelium from pericoronal soft tissue involving the right third molar was from a hyperplastic dental follicle or a small dentigerous cyst. It is speculated that the ultimate cause of the migration of the third molars was severe, aggressive periodontal disease of the adjacent molars.
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9/31. Migration following crown-lengthening procedure--a case report.

    Periodontal surgery may be accompanied with some postoperative complications such as pain, swelling and sloughing, purulence or infection, transient bacteremia, nerve trauma, and hemorrhage. In general, a resective surgical intervention may implicate reduction in the attachment apparatus. Migration as a postoperative complication has never been addressed in the literature. This paper presents a case report detailing migration of a tooth, following a surgical preprosthetic clinical crown-lengthening procedure, which was repositioned using adjunctive orthodontics with a removable maxillary modified Hawley appliance. It is incumbent upon the dentist to examine meticulously the occlusal status of the teeth prior to a planned surgical intervention and to take measures preventing any possible tooth migration during the healing process. Failure to achieve occlusal and intra-arch stability may lead to undesired tooth movement in the arch postsurgery, affecting future prognosis and complicating any planned prosthetic work.
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10/31. Spontaneous correction of pathologic tooth migration and reduced infrabony pockets following nonsurgical periodontal therapy: a case report.

    This case report describes the spontaneous correction of pathologic tooth migration and reduced infrabony pockets after nonsurgical periodontal therapy. A 3-mm diastema between the maxillary incisors was closed completely, and the mandibular teeth, which had migrated pathologically, returned to the optimal position. Clinical evaluation showed a significant reduction in probing depth, with increased clinical attachment and bone deposition demonstrated radiologically.
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