Cases reported "Tooth Mobility"

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1/42. Central neurilemmoma of the jaws. review of literature and case report.

    Neurilemmomas presenting as primary central bone tumors are extremely rare. Only 21 cases have been reported to have arisen in the jaws; all except for one have occurred in the mandible. The majority of these have been associated with the inferior dental nerve. A case of a central neurilemmoma arising in the anterior mandible is reported. Its probable origin is from one of the alveolar branches of the incisive nerve--an unusual site in the mandible. The radiographic features include expansion of cortical bone, resorption of roots of teeth, the presence of lace-like bony septa and a spotty calcification within the tumor. The treatment and the prognosis are briefly discussed.
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ranking = 1
keywords = bone
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2/42. Subgingival plaque and loss of attachment in periodontosis as observed in autopsy material.

    Histologic sections from six autopsy cases which from a clinical point of view fitted into the criteria of periodontosis were examined with the aim at evaluating the role of subgingival plaque in the etiology of the loss of attachment in this condition. The following pertinent observations were made: 1. The subgingival plaque in most instances was not calcified to form calculus. 2. The thickness of the subgingival plaque varied between 20 and 200 mu (0.02-0.2 mm). 3. Where loss of attachment had taken place, the distance from the most apical part of the subgingival plaque to the most apical point of the epithelial cuff varied between 0.2 and 1.1 mm; this distance was never found to be more than 1.1 mm. This would indicate a cause and effect relationship, the plaque being the obvious cause. 4. There was very severe chronic inflammation in the soft tissue bordering upon the plaque with resulting collagenolysis. 5. The cellular infiltration and the collagenolysis may be limited to a zone of 1 to 2 mm in the immediate vicinity of the plaque. Between the inflamed area and the surface of the gingivae buccally and lingually there may be a fairly wide zone of healthy tissue which hides the symptoms of inflammation from being observed on a clinical examination. In turn this could leave the clinician with the impression that attachment has been lost and bone resorbed because of degenerative changes. The following conclusions can be made: In these six cases of "alveolar bone loss vastly out of proportion to what one would expect from the local etiologic factors in the patient at that age" there was no morphologic evidence that degenerative changes were responsible for the loss of attachment. On the contrary inflammatory changes induced by the subgingval plaque dominated the histopathologic picture.
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keywords = bone
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3/42. Implant site development using orthodontic extrusion: a case report.

    One of the most important factors in the successful placement of endosseous implants is the presence of adequate alveolar bone at the recipient site. alveolar bone loss associated with destructive periodontal disease frequently results in osseous defects that may complicate subsequent implant placement. Typically, such defects are treated prior to or at the time of implant surgery using the principles of guided bone regeneration. Under certain circumstances, however, such defects may be managed non-surgically by orthodontic extrusion. orthodontic extrusion can be used to increase the vertical bone height and volume and to establish a more favourable soft-tissue profile prior to implant placement. The addition, the increase in the vertical osseous dimension at interproximal sites may assist in the preservation of the interdental papillae and can further enhance gingival aesthetics. This report illustrates the treatment sequence for site development with orthodontic extrusion prior to immediate implant placement.
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ranking = 2
keywords = bone
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4/42. A case of Burkitt's lymphoma that presented initially with resorption of alveolar bone.

    A 16-year-old male was evaluated for a 1-month history of alveolar bone resorption, which had been treated with endodontics by a neighborhood dentist. Intraoral examination showed slight gingival swelling and teeth mobility. However, no tumor mass was seen. The panoramic image showed resorption of alveolar bone and loss of teeth lamina dura. Because he complained of general fatigue, he was introduced to the internist. Biopsies of gingiva and bone marrow aspiration revealed a massive proliferation of lymphoblasts expressing CD10, 19, 20 and hla-dr antigens on the surface. Their karyotypes were abnormal; 46, XY, t (8;14) (q24;q32). Accordingly, he was diagnosed as Burkitt's lymphoma, and received intensive chemotherapy which relieved his symptoms and decreased his tumor. However, his disease soon became refractory to chemotherapy, and he died 11 weeks after the onset.
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ranking = 3.5
keywords = bone
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5/42. rehabilitation of a periodontal patient with rapidly progressing marginal alveolar bone loss: 1-year follow-up.

    BACKGROUND: The present case report describes a 1-year follow-up of functional rehabilitation of a young periodontal patient with severely advanced, rapidly progressing marginal bone loss treated by using a new splinting material, i.e., glass fiber-reinforced composite (FRC). Apart from one single tooth, the young man had retained all his natural teeth. TREATMENT: Periodontal treatment was based on cleaning and root planing enabled by partial-thickness-flap operations. This method was selected to avoid further damage to the remaining alveolar bone. After healing for 6 months, a cavity retained internal FRC splint was constructed and 1 missing lower molar was replaced by an inlay-retained FRC resin-bonded fixed partial denture (FPD). A 12 months follow-up period revealed a healthy periodontium and good functional and esthetic results. CONCLUSIONS: The new material allows the use of periodontal treatment methods instead of prosthetic alternatives, which until now have been a more generally used approach in the treatment of severely advanced periodontal cases. Internal fiber-reinforced composite splinting being affordable for the patient, easy for the clinician to construct and giving good esthetic and functional results, suggests that the method may be a valuable aid in periodontal treatment.
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ranking = 3
keywords = bone
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6/42. Coronal ridge augmentation in the absence of bilateral bony plates around a pathologically denuded implant surface.

    Guided bone regeneration via an osteopromotive barrier is indicated in different alveolar bone deficiencies and in periimplant bone destruction around pathologically denuded exposed implants. Regeneration of the osseous volume is determined by understanding the biologic behavior response of hard and soft tissues in guided tissue regeneration procedures. Consequently, a meticulous surgical approach is mandatory to preserve wound healing cascades and tissue stability. However, hard tissue augmentation in the nonsupported coronal direction has been unpredictable. A case report is presented in which a severely defected ridge around a pathologically exposed functional implant combined with a destructive extraction site was restored and regenerated. Bovine bone mineral particles (Bio-Oss) served as the graft material and were followed by an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (e-PTFE) occlusive membrane as a bilateral regenerative tissue guide. Subsequently, 2 additional implants were placed in the augmented hard tissue ridge.
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ranking = 2
keywords = bone
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7/42. Treatment of aggressive periodontitis by osseointegrated dental implants. A case report.

    BACKGROUND: Generalized aggressive periodontitis is described as a clinical entity affecting both deciduous and permanent dentition with extensive alveolar bone loss, mobility, and exfoliation of all or many teeth. Controversy exists on dental implant use to restore missing dentition in younger patients. methods: This case report presents a patient diagnosed with aggressive periodontitis who has lost all but 4 of her teeth. Her personal and functional desires led us to include implant therapy in her treatment plan. The hematological data are presented with an analysis of the immunological profile. RESULTS: dental implants were placed, and following 3 months of osseointegration, an implant-supported prosthesis was completed. The patient was followed up for 36 months. CONCLUSIONS: This case report presents an alternative treatment for rehabilitating dentition in a young patient treated for aggressive periodontitis. Similar case studies may help eliminate some of the controversy that exists regarding the use of dental implants in aggressive periodontitis patients.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = bone
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8/42. Anaesthesia of the right lower hemilip as a first manifestation of multiple myeloma. Presentation of a clinical case.

    multiple myeloma is a malignant proliferation of plasma cells. It may affect any of various bones, causing osteolytic lesions with a characteristic "punched out" radiographic appearance. The commonest symptom is bone pain. One of the most frequent locations is the mandible. Symptoms of multiple myeloma of the mandible include tumefaction, non-specific pain, tooth mobility and sometimes loss, and paraesthesia of the dental nerve. Here we report a case of multiple myeloma of the mandible which was unusual in that the presenting complaint was anaesthesia of the right lower hemilip.
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ranking = 1
keywords = bone
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9/42. Clinical effect of etidronate on alveolar pyorrhoea associated with chronic marginal periodontitis: report of four cases.

    Etidronate 200 mg daily was administered to four female patients with periodontitis and resultant alveolar pyorrhoea for periods of 2 weeks, followed by off-periods of 10 weeks or more, for 2-3 years. The macroscopic appearance of gingival mobility of the teeth, depth of periodontal pockets, and X-ray findings of alveolar bones improved markedly during this time. The effects were first observed after 6-12 months of treatment. These findings indicate that bisphosphonates may be effective in the treatment of periodontitis and resultant alveolar pyorrhoea. The effect may be mediated by the inhibitory action on bone resorption and the anti-inflammatory action of etidronate. Concomitant conventional dental management is also required.
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ranking = 1
keywords = bone
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10/42. Regenerative treatment of serious periodontosis with grafting of cancellous iliac bone and gingival flaps and replanting of patients' teeth.

    The purpose of this study was to assess the ability of serious periodontosis patients to regain satisfactory biting function, using the patients' own teeth, by regeneration of the alveolar bone. Twelve serious periodontosis patients whose alveolar bone was markedly absorbed and whose teeth were quite unstable were treated with replanting of their teeth and grafting of cancellous iliac bone and gingival flaps by the clinical team, which consisted of plastic surgeons and dentists. No patients developed postoperative complications (e.g., infections), and grafted iliac bone took in all patients. The total number of replanted teeth was 65, and only 4 of them fell off (92% take rate). Three to 4 months after surgery, the replanted teeth received prosthetic treatment so that the patients could begin biting. Ten patients were monitored for 5 months or longer, and they started to eat normal food after the fifth month. Regained biting function and satisfaction of having food were almost the same as before the periodontosis became severe in these 10 patients. Regeneration of alveolar bone was confirmed in later radiographs. To date, the maximum follow-up period is 2 years and 8 months (average = 1 year and 6 months). All patients have good biting function, and there have been no findings of absorption of reconstructed alveolar bone or of the root of replanted teeth. This treatment method would be quite useful for patients with serious periodontosis.
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ranking = 5
keywords = bone
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