Cases reported "Tooth Mobility"

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1/15. Central neurilemmoma of the jaws. review of literature and case report.

    Neurilemmomas presenting as primary central bone tumors are extremely rare. Only 21 cases have been reported to have arisen in the jaws; all except for one have occurred in the mandible. The majority of these have been associated with the inferior dental nerve. A case of a central neurilemmoma arising in the anterior mandible is reported. Its probable origin is from one of the alveolar branches of the incisive nerve--an unusual site in the mandible. The radiographic features include expansion of cortical bone, resorption of roots of teeth, the presence of lace-like bony septa and a spotty calcification within the tumor. The treatment and the prognosis are briefly discussed.
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ranking = 1
keywords = resorption
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2/15. A case of Burkitt's lymphoma that presented initially with resorption of alveolar bone.

    A 16-year-old male was evaluated for a 1-month history of alveolar bone resorption, which had been treated with endodontics by a neighborhood dentist. Intraoral examination showed slight gingival swelling and teeth mobility. However, no tumor mass was seen. The panoramic image showed resorption of alveolar bone and loss of teeth lamina dura. Because he complained of general fatigue, he was introduced to the internist. Biopsies of gingiva and bone marrow aspiration revealed a massive proliferation of lymphoblasts expressing CD10, 19, 20 and hla-dr antigens on the surface. Their karyotypes were abnormal; 46, XY, t (8;14) (q24;q32). Accordingly, he was diagnosed as Burkitt's lymphoma, and received intensive chemotherapy which relieved his symptoms and decreased his tumor. However, his disease soon became refractory to chemotherapy, and he died 11 weeks after the onset.
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ranking = 6
keywords = resorption
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3/15. Idiopathic root resorption: report of a case.

    A case of multiple idiopathic apical root resorption in a 26-yr-old female patient is presented. A review of the literature revealed that extensive idiopathic root resorption is unusual. Neither local nor systemic etiological factors were found in our case. Examination of parents and siblings did not reveal a familiar tendency. Radiographs and clinical evaluation showed a very poor prognosis for most of the teeth present in the mouth of our patient.
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ranking = 6
keywords = resorption
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4/15. Clinical effect of etidronate on alveolar pyorrhoea associated with chronic marginal periodontitis: report of four cases.

    Etidronate 200 mg daily was administered to four female patients with periodontitis and resultant alveolar pyorrhoea for periods of 2 weeks, followed by off-periods of 10 weeks or more, for 2-3 years. The macroscopic appearance of gingival mobility of the teeth, depth of periodontal pockets, and X-ray findings of alveolar bones improved markedly during this time. The effects were first observed after 6-12 months of treatment. These findings indicate that bisphosphonates may be effective in the treatment of periodontitis and resultant alveolar pyorrhoea. The effect may be mediated by the inhibitory action on bone resorption and the anti-inflammatory action of etidronate. Concomitant conventional dental management is also required.
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ranking = 1
keywords = resorption
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5/15. Restoration and retention of maxillary anteriors with severe root resorption.

    BACKGROUND: The authors describe the treatment of three patients who had severe apical root resorption of maxillary lateral incisors caused by ectopically erupting canines. Ectopically erupting canines derive from a normal path of eruption and may cause resorption of the adjacent teeth. CASE DESCRIPTION: The authors present the three cases of severe root resorption caused by ectopically erupting canines. They then discuss various prosthetic options; the indications, advantages and disadvantages of various treatment modalities; the long-term retention and esthetic concerns of the patients; and the inherent limitations of restorative treatment. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Increased tooth mobility and long-term retention are significant concerns in cases of patients who have severe root resorption. Attaining stability with lingual splinting can cause esthetic problems. An interdisciplinary approach is necessary to provide optimal care for the patient.
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ranking = 8
keywords = resorption
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6/15. Primary hyperoxaluria in a pediatric dental patient: case report.

    A case is presented in which primary hyperoxaluria and oxalosis in a 14-year-old Caucasian female were diagnosed. Generalized root resorption resulted in a remarkable mobility of her maxillary central and lateral incisors, although no bone loss was noted. The management of the patient's dental concerns in this rare heritable metabolic disorder consisted of removing the maxillary incisor teeth and placing two sequential prostheses, which the patient tolerated well. A history of trauma to the maxillary incisors was ruled out, so this case adds previously unreported information to our knowledge about the effect of oxaluria on teeth and oral tissues.
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ranking = 1
keywords = resorption
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7/15. Hereditary gingival fibromatosis associated with generalized aggressive periodontitis: a case report.

    BACKGROUND: Hereditary gingival fibromatosis is a rare, genetically inherited overgrowth condition that is clinically characterized by a benign fibrous enlargement of maxillary and mandibular keratinized gingiva. A syndromic association between gingival fibromatosis and a wide variety of other genetically inherited disorders has been described. However, its coexistence with aggressive periodontitis has not been reported. methods: A 24-year-old African-American female, patient (proband X, [Px]) reported with a chief complaint of tooth mobility and gingival enlargement. Clinical examination revealed moderate to severe gingival overgrowth on both mandible and maxilla. Generalized attachment loss and mobility of the teeth were observed. Radiographic evaluation demonstrated severe alveolar bone loss. The patient was diagnosed with gingival fibromatosis and aggressive periodontitis based on the clinical and radiographic findings. Her brother (Bx) and her mother (Mx) were evaluated and diagnosed with gingival fibromatosis suggesting that this is a dominant trait in the family and gingival fibromatosis might be of hereditary origin. In addition, the brother also exhibited localized aggressive periodontitis. Medical history revealed no other systemic or local contributory factors associated with the oral findings in any of the subjects. RESULTS: Surgical therapy included internal bevel gingivectomy combined with open flap debridement procedures for Px and Bx. Only internal bevel gingivectomy was performed for Mx since there was mild bone resorption and no intrabony defects. At the time of surgery, gingival biopsies were obtained and fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde. Multiple serial sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Microscopic evaluation of the gingival specimens revealed large parallel collagen bundles associated with scarce fibroblasts in the connective tissue. The collagen bundles reached into the subepithelial connective tissue where elongated rete-pegs were also observed. Following the completion of the treatment, no signs of recurrence or bone resorption were observed over 2-year follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first report of hereditary gingival fibromatosis associated with aggressive periodontitis. Combined treatment comprising removal of fibrotic gingival tissue and traditional flap surgery for the elimination of intrabony defects represents a unique treatment approach in periodontal therapy. Two-year follow-up revealed that both the gingival overgrowth and the destructive lesions were successfully treated.
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ranking = 2
keywords = resorption
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8/15. Long-term occlusal guidance of a severely intoxicated patient with yusho (PCB poisoning): a case report.

    The peculiar dentoorofacial characteristics and 12 years of interdisciplinary management of a patient who was severely intoxicated with the man-made chemical polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are described in this case report. Cephalometric measurements showed that the SNA and SNB angles were reduced but that the developments in height and skeletal maturity were in normal ranges. Gingival hyperpigmentation that was caused by high blood PCB concentration was extremely slow to fade. A cystic mass, diffused trabeculae, and irregular calcification, which were shown on the radiograph and which were caused by high blood levels of PCB, changed gradually. However, the patient had periodontal disease because of horizontal alveolar bone resorption and a deep periodontal pocket, despite good plaque control. After the PCB poisoning the tooth roots were hypoplastic and dilacerated. One root was extracted because of chronic periodontitis. Some teeth were impacted, malposed, or ankylosed.
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ranking = 1
keywords = resorption
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9/15. Facial distortion secondary to idiopathic gingival hyperplasia: surgical management and oral reconstruction with endosseous implants.

    Little information exists regarding the surgical and oral reconstructive options for the patient with idiopathic gingival hyperplasia, especially with regard to endosseous implant placement and recurrence of the disease. The authors report a case of severe gingival enlargement and bone resorption involving the maxillary and mandibular arches in a 21-year-old female causing distortion of facial features. The etiology could not be established but the condition was exacerbated during pregnancy, causing chewing, speaking, and esthetic problems. The hyperplastic tissue and all the teeth were removed surgically, followed by immediate placement of 2 endosseous implants. Restoration of esthetics and function with a maxillary denture and mandibular overdenture were completed 3 months later. No disease recurrence was noted at the 6-month postoperative interval.
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ranking = 1
keywords = resorption
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10/15. Vertical control by combining a monoblock appliance in adult class III overclosure treatment.

    Monoblock appliances were used in combination with intermaxillary elastics for treatment of adult skeletal Class III patients. The patients showed predisposing upper incisors problems, significant mobility in patient 1 and root resorption in patient 2, which contraindicated direct intrusion of the incisors. Using the monoblock with selective extrusion of the molars, a clockwise rotation was induced to reduce overbite and to achieve a better profile. It was also possible to reduce the excessive force to the upper incisors during and after treatment, which improved incisor mobility to a physiologic extent (patient 1) and prevented further progression of root resorption (patient 2). Stability was high after the 2-year follow-up, which suggests a stable vertical control approach by using the monoblock appliance in combination with a fixed appliance in adults.
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ranking = 2
keywords = resorption
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