Cases reported "Tooth Wear"

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1/3. death, after swallowing and aspiration of a high number of foreign bodies, in a schizophrenic woman.

    A 46-year-old woman who had had a long-term schizoid psychosis collapsed on the street. Upon admission to the hospital, she was determined to have an acute abdomen. The chest radiograph showed metallic foreign bodies in both main bronchi; foreign bodies in the stomach were not observed clinically. The woman died from repeated cardiac arrest shortly after hospital admission. At the autopsy a screw and a nail were found in both main bronchi. The abdominal cavity contained 2 L of greenish purulent fluid and a massive fibrinoid peritonitis was observed. Two perforations of the stomach, each 1 cm in diameter, were detected. The stomach was completely filled with a mass of metallic foreign bodies, greenish fluid, and a bezoar of a total weight of 1,400 g; 422 distinguishable and mostly metallic foreign bodies were counted. death was attributed to cardiac arrest in delayed shock after massive purulent peritonitis caused by two gastric perforations combined with obstruction of the airways by aspirated foreign bodies. Cases of massive swallowing of foreign bodies are mainly restricted to mentally handicapped persons, especially schizophrenics, whereas acute impaction of the larynx by large food particles occurs nearly exclusively in heavily intoxicated adults.
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2/3. Kawasaki disease complicated by gallbladder hydrops mimicking acute abdomen: a report of three cases.

    Three cases of gallbladder hydrops associated with Kawasaki disease are presented. The initial manifestations were high fever, jaundice and distended abdomen with guarding. The first two cases received laparotomy under the impression of suppurative cholecystitis with peritonitis. A markedly distended acalculous, nongangrenous gallbladder was noted. A cholecystostomy for drainage was performed. diagnosis of Kawasaki disease was made only when the clinical manifestations became full-blown postoperatively. Both patients led an uneventful postoperative course. The third case had apparent features of Kawasaki disease at admission though the abdominal symptoms were rather prominent. With supportive care, the patient stabilized by the sixth hospital day without complication and did not require surgical intervention. We suggest that the preferred treatment of abdominal symptoms in Kawasaki disease is medical, and surgical intervention is deserved only for the complications of the hydrops. Simple cholecystostomy seems to be safe and sufficient for such occasion. ultrasonography is helpful for the correct diagnosis of gallbladder hydrops and can exclude dilatation of the intrahepatic biliary trees and cholelithiasis.
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3/3. Spontaneous perforation of the hepatic duct in adults.

    BACKGROUND: Nontraumatic perforations of the extrahepatic biliary ductal system are a rare albeit recognized occurrence in the cystic duct, choledochus and main hepatic duct; the latter appears to be the rarest. methods: Recent experience with such a case prompted a thorough review of 26 similar cases previously reported. RESULTS: It appears that obstruction of the biliary tract by gallstones results in raised intraductal pressure leading to dilatation of the biliary tree, subsequent stasis and infection, causing ascending cholangitis and thrombosis of intramural vessels, leading to necrosis and perforation of the duct wall. Most patients present with an acute abdomen and are operated upon. CONCLUSIONS: The goals of operation, which should be tailored to the individual patient, are to stop the bile leak, cure choledocholithiasis and cholangitis and reconstruct the bile duct.
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