Cases reported "Toothache"

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1/43. Abrasion, erosion, and abfraction combined with linear enamel hypoplasia: a case report.

    Linear enamel hypoplasia is a developmental disturbance of enamel resulting in clinically visible horizontal defects in enamel that are present on eruption of the tooth. Nondevelopmental lesions of the hard tissues of the tooth, including carious, abrasion, erosion, attrition, and abfraction lesions, require varying amounts of time after tooth eruption to develop. Because linear enamel hypoplasia lesions are present on eruption and are exposed to the factors responsible for abrasion, erosion, and abfraction, nondevelopmental lesions could occur within them in any combination. This report describes a patient with multiple teeth with linear enamel hypoplasia lesions containing nondevelopmental defects as well as nondevelopmental defects that occurred separately. Severe pain and a unique lesion morphology were associated with the linear enamel hypoplasia defects. Affected teeth were extracted because of advanced periodontitis and were sectioned to determine the nature of the enamel and dentin lesions.
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keywords = tooth, eruption
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2/43. toothache of cardiac origin.

    pain referred to the orofacial structures can sometimes be a diagnostic challenge for the clinician. In some instances, a patient may complain of tooth pain that is completely unrelated to any dental source. This poses a diagnostic and therapeutic problem for the dentist. Cardiac pain most commonly radiates to the left arm, shoulder, neck, and face. In rare instances, angina pectoris may present as dental pain. When this occurs, an improper diagnosis frequently leads to unnecessary dental treatment or, more significantly, a delay of proper treatment. This delay may result in the patient experiencing an acute myocardial infarction. It is the dentist's responsibility to establish a proper diagnosis so that the treatment will be directed toward the source of pain and not to the site of pain. This article reviews the literature concerning referred pain of cardiac origin and presents a case report of toothache of cardiac origin.
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ranking = 0.64997208072972
keywords = tooth
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3/43. Reversible and irreversible painful pulpitides: diagnosis and treatment.

    The foregoing clinical evidence indicates that when pain is severe, or when mild to moderate pain is present with a previous history of pain in the aching tooth, with or without periapical radiolucency, the tooth is in the IRPP category. Treatment dictates endodontic therapy or extraction. On the other hand, when clinical evidence indicates that the pain is mild or moderate with no previous history of pain, normal pulp vitality, and there is no positive percussion sign, the pulp is in the RPP category. Treatment dictates indirect or direct pulp capping in teeth with or without periapical radiolucency. The success rate favours teeth with no periapical radiolucency, 98%; in teeth with periapical radiolucency the success rate is less favorable, 43%. Efforts should be made to maintain pulp vitality. Endodontic therapy can always be done, if in time the pulp develops necrosis.
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ranking = 0.64997208072972
keywords = tooth
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4/43. Unusual tooth sensation due to maxillary sinusitis--a case report.

    maxillary sinusitis can cause pain or discomfort to the maxillary dentition but no report of patients complaining of a "jumping tooth sensation" during sinusitis has been recorded in the literature. This article presents a case of an unusual localised sensation from a maxillary right second premolar experienced while undergoing root canal treatment. This sensation was felt during walking while the patient was suffering an episode of influenza. This sensation first occurred following debridement of the root canal. However, it persisted even after the root canal had been sealed. A hypothetical explanation of this manifestation is proposed.
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ranking = 1.6249302018243
keywords = tooth
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5/43. Malignant lymphoma of the maxillary sinus manifesting as a persistent toothache.

    Many teeth have been mistakenly extracted or endodontically treated because of an incorrect diagnosis of orofacial pain, including toothache. A case of persistent toothache originating from a malignant lymphoma of the left maxillary sinus is presented. root canal therapy and extraction of the upper left quadrant teeth from the canine to the second molar did not resolve the chief complaint. The patient was referred to a neurologist and received a diagnosis of a malignant lymphoma, a rare lesion of the maxillary sinus. This case stresses the importance of considering malignant neoplasm of the maxillary sinus as a potential etiologic factor in the differential diagnosis of orofacial pain.
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ranking = 1.9499162421892
keywords = tooth
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6/43. Pseudo-dental pain and sensitivity to percussion.

    Two case reports examine a little-known cause of dental pain and sensitivity to percussion. Contrary to the traditional assumption that pain and sensitivity to percussion almost always are diagnostic of pulpal inflammation and/or necrosis, these symptoms actually may be referred to the sensitive tooth from trigger points in the masticatory muscles. Therefore, myofascial pain syndrome must be ruled out in patients who have dental pain and display sensitivity to percussion.
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ranking = 0.32498604036486
keywords = tooth
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7/43. Temporal arteritis: a cough, toothache, and tongue infarction.

    Temporal arteritis, the most common form of systemic vasculitis in adults, is a panarteritis that chiefly involves the extracranial branches of the carotid artery. The condition is illustrated in this article by the case of a 79-year-old woman with a dry cough, toothache, tongue infarction, and vision loss. The mean age of onset is 72 years and the disease rarely occurs in persons younger than 50 years. The most common presenting manifestations are headache, jaw claudication, polymyalgia rheumatica, and visual symptoms. Eighty-nine percent of patients have an erythrocyte sedimentation rate greater than 50 mm/h. However, about 40% of patients present with atypical manifestations, including fever of unknown origin, respiratory tract symptoms (especially dry cough), and large artery involvement. Familiarity with such unusual manifestations of temporal arteritis facilitates early diagnosis and treatment, thereby reducing the risk of vision loss.
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ranking = 1.6249302018243
keywords = tooth
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8/43. The diagnosis of referred orofacial dental pain.

    Every patient's description of the location of pain must be treated with caution. In order to arrive at a diagnosis of pain a logical method should be employed. This consists of the history and clinical examination including pulp tests and radiographs. Where the patient complains of pain on hot or cold, an attempt should be made to reproduce the patient's pain to check on the accuracy of its description and to aid in localisation. patients frequently refer pain to previously endodontically-treated teeth. These may not be the cause of the problem. In order to facilitate the process of diagnosis the following hypothesis has been advanced. A tooth can only be the source of pain if there are objective signs associated with that tooth. Lack of response to pulp tests constitutes such a sign, provided the tooth has not previously been endodontically treated. If, however, such treatment has taken place, (regardless of whether this was well or poorly executed), a further objective sign other than lack of vitality is required before such a tooth can be implicated as the source of pain. The guidelines suggested are illustrated by means of clinical examples.
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ranking = 1.2999441614594
keywords = tooth
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9/43. Reference fields in phantom tooth pain as a marker for remapping in the facial territory.

    Six patients with chronic phantom tooth pain were studied for the presence of reference fields for their phantom sensation. In five of them, pain or dysesthesia in the affected oral structures was elicited by thermal or mechanical stimulation of areas that were well separate from these structures. However, a relation of topographical proximity between the stimulated areas and the areas of reference could be traced in the sensory maps. Therefore, denervation of small structures with coarse sensitivity can yield the plastic changes that have previously been described for larger deafferentations of areas endowed with finer discriminative capacity.
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ranking = 1.6249302018243
keywords = tooth
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10/43. Talon cusp causing occlusal trauma and acute apical periodontitis: report of a case.

    - The talon cusp, or dens evaginatus of anterior teeth, is a relatively rare dental developmental anomaly characterized by the presence of an accessory cusp-like structure projecting from the cingulum area or cemento-enamel junction. This occurs in either maxillary or mandibular anterior teeth in both the primary and permanent dentition. One of the main problems caused by accessory cusps are occlusal interferences. The anomalous cusp even can generate occlusal trauma and reversible acute apical periodontitis of the opposing tooth. This article reports a case of talon cusp affecting the permanent maxillary left lateral incisor that caused clinical problems related to occlusal trauma and apical periodontitis caused by a premature contact. The treatment of the occlusal interference produced by the taloned tooth is described.
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ranking = 0.64997208072972
keywords = tooth
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