Cases reported "Torticollis"

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1/122. Congenital fistula of the palate.

    Four cases of congenital fistula of the palate are presented. All four patients had a fistula which was situated in the vault with a bifid uvula, submucous separation of the palatal muscles, deformities of the palatal plates and unilateral cleft lip. Velopharyngeal incompetence appeared in primarily treated children. The aetiology and surgical treatment of the congenital defect are discussed.
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2/122. The sternomastoid "tumor" of infancy.

    The sternomastoid "tumor" of infancy is a firm, fibrous mass, appearing at two to three weeks of age. It may or may not be associated with torticollis. Generally, the "tumor" initially grows, then stabilizes, and in about half the cases recedes spontaneously after a few months. It may leave a residual torticollis or may be associated with a facial or cranial asymmetry of a delayed torticollis. The etiology is unknown, a direct cause and effect relationship to birth trauma has been largely disproved although approximately half these children are products of breech deliveries. The treatment is controversial. Approximately half of these "tumors" will resolve spontaneously without sequelae. Progressive torticollis or development of facial asymmetry are considered indications for surgery. The purpose of this report is to acquaint the head and neck surgeon with this entity which may confront him for diagnosis and treatment.
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ranking = 0.96498423587177
keywords = neck
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3/122. Congenital torticollis in association with craniosynostosis.

    The incidence of congenital torticollis in association with plagiocephaly is 1 in 300 newborns, with the torticollis resulting from pathologically sustained contraction of the sternocleidomastoid. Such conditions as facial asymmetries, craniovertebral anomalies, cervical hemivertebra, and mono- or polydysostoses may also be associated with torticollis diagnosed during the neonatal period. With particular reference to synostotic (coronal and/or lambdoidal) plagiocephaly, a clear distinction is made in this paper between posterior neurocranial flattening secondary to the sustained rotation of the skull resulting from torticollis and that seen in synostotic plagiocephaly. The rarity of torticollis with sustained contraction of the sternocleidomastoid muscle relative to the frequency of occipital-parietal flattening in newborn kept in the supine position has not been discussed in the literature and is therefore of clinical importance. In light of the fact that the prognosis and, consequently, the treatment plan vary directly with the presence or absence of synostoses, clinical evaluation also includes cephalometrics, plain skull x-rays, and CT imaging. If the torticollis is associated with neurocranial deformity but synostosis is absent, cervical traction and physiotherapy resolve the symptoms. When, however, the clinical picture is complicated by synostotic plagiocephaly, corrective surgery is necessary, though cervical traction and physiotherapy are essential to provide early and complete cure of the torticollis.
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4/122. Case report of malocclusion with abnormal head posture and TMJ symptoms.

    Abnormal cervical muscle function can cause abnormal head posture, adversely affecting the development and morphology of the cervical spine and maxillofacial skeleton, which in turn leads to facial asymmetry and occlusal abnormality. There can be morphologic abnormalities of the mandibular fossa, condyle, ramus, and disk accompanying the imbalance of the cervical and masticatory muscles activities. Two normally growing Japanese female patients with Class II Division 1 malocclusion presented with TMJ symptoms and poor head posture as a result of abnormal sternocleidomastoid and trapezius cervical muscle activities. One patient underwent tenotomy of the two heads of the sternocleidomastoid muscle and the other patient did not. In addition to orthodontics, the 2 patients received physiotherapy of the cervical muscles during treatment. Both were treated with a functional appliance as a first step, followed by full multi-bracketed treatment to establish a stable form of occlusion and to improve facial esthetics with no head gear. This interdisciplinary treatment approach resulted in normalization of stomatognathic function, elimination of TMJ symptoms, and improvement of facial esthetics. In the growing patients, the significant response of the fossa, condyle, and ramus on the affected side during and after occlusal correction contributed to the improvement of cervical muscle activity. Based on the result, early occlusal improvement, combined with orthopedic surgery of the neck muscles or physiotherapy to achieve muscular balance of the neck and masticatory muscles, was found to be effective. Two patients illustrate the potential for promoting symmetric formation of the TMJ structures and normal jaw function, with favorable effects on posttreatment growth of the entire maxillofacial skeleton.
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ranking = 170428.23034241
keywords = neck muscle, muscle, neck
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5/122. Bilateral sternocleidomastoid tumors of infancy.

    The sternocleidomastoid tumor of infancy (STOI) is a relatively uncommon condition. Typically, it presents as a firm, well circumscribed mass within the sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM) in infants 1-8 weeks of age and may be associated with torticollis. This condition must be considered in any infant with a lateral neck mass. The diagnosis can often be made clinically, but unusual presentations may present diagnostic challenges. Although bilateral involvement is rare, it does occur. The second reported case, a 2-week old female with bilateral STOIs and torticollis, is reported. Although many of the characteristics of the masses suggested the condition, the bilateral nature added uncertainty to the clinical impression, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to confirm the diagnosis. The clinical presentation and management of the STOI are reviewed, and the unusual features of this case are discussed.
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ranking = 1.9649842358718
keywords = muscle, neck
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6/122. Refractory torticollis after a fall.

    Though multiple medical and psychiatric causes of torticollis have been described, cervical dystonias resulting from distant somatic dysfunctions have not. This article describes the treatment of a 62-year-old woman in whom refractory retrotorticollis of surmised pelvic etiology developed after a fall. Structurally, cervical dystonias have been addressed as problems that originate in the head and neck, but this limited view of the musculoskeletal component of torticollis may prevent physicians from directing osteopathic manipulative treatment to the underlying problem.
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ranking = 0.96498423587177
keywords = neck
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7/122. Unilateral pallidal stimulation in cervical dystonia.

    Cervical dystonia (spasmodic torticollis) is a focal dystonia of the cervical region. Various treatment modalities have been performed with variable success rates. We present a 42-year-old woman complaining of involuntary head rotation for the last 3 years. Different medical treatments had been used for 3 years. Botulinum toxin injections resulted in temporary and moderate improvement for periods of 3-4 months. Pallidal stimulation was performed using a quadripolar electrode and a battery-operated programmable pulse generator. We conclude that a unilateral pallidal lesion or stimulation is an effective method of treatment in focal dystonia. The target must be the pallidum contralateral to the contracted sternocloidomastoid muscle. deep brain stimulation is superior to lesioning because of the capability of manipulating the stimulation parameters which can modify the pallidotomy effect.
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8/122. Rotary atlanto-axial subluxation with torticollis following central-venous catheter insertion.

    Atlanto-axial subluxation with torticollis is an uncommon condition that occurs in children usually as a result of pharyngeal infection, minor trauma, or neck surgery. Passive motion of the head and neck during general anesthesia is probably another etiologic factor. torticollis is the most common presenting physical finding. pain may or may not be present, but is commonly present with passive neck motion. Neurologic sequelae are uncommon. Our case illustrates this condition as a complication of central venous catheter (CVC) insertion in a child under general anesthesia. The surgeon should suspect this pathology when a child presents with torticollis following CVC placement. Precautions should be taken in the operating room to avoid aggressive rotation and extension of the child's neck while under general anesthesia whether or not cervical inflammation is present. Special attention to head and neck positioning should be taken in patients with Down's syndrome since they are at increased risk for atlanto-axial subluxation. The prognosis is excellent when diagnosed early. A delay in diagnosis can result in the need for surgical intervention.
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ranking = 4.8249211793588
keywords = neck
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9/122. Spasmodic torticollis due to neurovascular compression of the spinal accessory nerve by the anteroinferior cerebellar artery: case report.

    OBJECTIVE AND IMPORTANCE: Spasmodic torticollis is a neuromuscular disorder characterized by uncontrollable clonic and intermittently tonic spasm of the neck muscles. We report a case of spasmodic torticollis attributable to neurovascular compression of the right XIth cranial nerve by the right anteroinferior cerebellar artery (AICA). CLINICAL PRESENTATION: A 72-year-old man with a 2-year history of right spasmodic torticollis underwent magnetic resonance imaging, which demonstrated compression of the right XIth cranial nerve by an abnormal descending loop of the right AICA. INTERVENTION: The patient underwent microvascular decompression surgery. During surgery, it was confirmed that an abnormal loop of the right AICA was compressing the right accessory nerve. Compression was released by the interposition of muscle between the artery and the nerve. CONCLUSION: The patient's postoperative course was uneventful, and his symptoms were fully relieved at the 2-year follow-up examination. This is the first reported case of spasmodic torticollis attributable to compression by the AICA; usually, the blood vessels involved are the vertebral artery and the posteroinferior cerebellar artery.
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ranking = 170421.26535817
keywords = neck muscle, muscle, neck
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10/122. Effect of prolonged neck muscle vibration on lateral head tilt in severe spasmodic torticollis.

    Short term vibration of the dorsal neck muscles (10-35 s) is known to induce involuntary movements of the head in patients with spasmodic torticollis. To investigate whether neck muscle vibration might serve as a therapeutic tool when applied for a longer time interval, we compared a vibration interval of 5 seconds with a 15 minute interval in a patient with spasmodic torticollis with an extreme head tilt to the right shoulder. head position was recorded with a two camera optoelectronic motion analyzer in six different test conditions. vibration regularly induced a rapid change of head position that was markedly closer to a normal, upright posture. After 5 seconds of vibration, head position very quickly returned to the initial position within seconds. During the 15 minute interval, head position remained elevated. After terminating vibration in this condition, the corrected head position remained stable at first and then decreased slowly within minutes to the initial tilted position. CONCLUSIONS: (1) In this patient, muscle vibration was the specific sensory input that induced lengthening of the dystonic neck muscles. Neither haptic stimulation nor transcutaneous electrical stimulation had more than a marginal effect. (2) The marked difference in the change of head position after short and prolonged stimulation supports the hypothesis that spasmodic torticollis might result from a disturbance of the central processing of the afferent input conveying head position information-at least in those patients who are sensitive to sensory stimulation in the neck region. (3) Long term neck muscle vibration may provide a convenient non-invasive method for treating spasmodic torticollis at the central level by influencing the neural control of head on trunk position.
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ranking = 1363364.0878496
keywords = neck muscle, muscle, neck
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