Cases reported "Tourette Syndrome"

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1/254. The prevalence of Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome in children and adolescents with autism.

    Thirty-seven pupils attending a special school for children and adolescents with autism were observed for the presence of motor and vocal tics. Subsequent family interviews confirmed the diagnosis of comorbid Gilles de la Tourette's Syndrome (GTS) in three children with autism, giving a minimum prevalence rate of 8.1 %. family history data also suggested this was heritable. The presence of GTS was not associated with superior intellectual, language, or social development. Results suggest that the rate of GTS in autism may exceed that expected by chance. The limited sample size constrains this conclusion. A large-scale epidemiological study testing this association study would appear merited.
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ranking = 1
keywords = tic, vocal tic, vocal, motor
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2/254. Lamotrigine-induced tourettism.

    BACKGROUND: Lamotrigine (LTG) has a broad spectrum of antiepileptic efficacy and generally benign side effects except for idiosyncratic rashes. OBJECTIVE: Three children are described in whom LTG caused dose-related tourette syndrome (TS) symptoms. Although undoubtedly rare, this interesting phenomenon supports the mounting evidence in favor of the multifactorial genesis of TS symptoms. RESULTS: The main known antiseizure mechanism of LTG is to block excessive presynaptic release of excitatory amino acids (EAAs), which occurs when there are sustained neuronal burst firings, as happens within epileptogenic brain tissue. LTG does not prevent the spontaneous release of EAAs and thus does not affect their normal functions. CONCLUSIONS: Among the many proposed explanations for the pathogenesis of TS is the dopamine hypothesis: a dysfunction in dopamine uptake in the striatum. EAAs can also interfere with striatal dopamine uptake. Conceivably, LTG may cause TS symptoms by failing, at high doses, to regulate the presynaptic release of EAAs in the striatum properly.
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ranking = 2.0086348328957
keywords = tic
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3/254. Fractionation of visual memory: evidence from a case with multiple neurodevelopmental impairments.

    It is known that the adult visual memory system is fractionable into functionally independent cognitive subsystems, selectively susceptible to brain damage. However, it is unclear whether these cognitive subsystems can fractionate developmentally. The present study describes an investigation of visual memory of a patient (PE) with multiple developmental disorders. PE was congenitally deaf, had Gilles de la tourette syndrome and autism, with non-verbal ability in the normal range. The patient presented with a recognition memory impairment for unknown human faces. This contrasted with his superior recognition memory for unknown buildings, landscapes and outdoor scenes. PE's memory impairment for faces could not be explained by a general deficit in face processing. Interestingly, PE also showed a recognition memory impairment for animals. These findings indicate that different domains of the visual memory system can be fractionated developmentally. In particular, it demonstrates that topographical memory can develop independently from other aspects of visual memory.
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ranking = 0.50215870822392
keywords = tic
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4/254. tourette syndrome associated with unilateral cystic changes in the gyrus rectus.

    brain magnetic resonance imaging of an 11-year-old male with tourette syndrome demonstrated multicystic changes predominately in the gyrus rectus of the left frontal lobe. Other brain regions, including the basal ganglia, were normal. He did not have any symptoms of the comorbid conditions associated with tourette syndrome, such as attention-deficit disorder or obsessive-compulsive disorder. The possible neurobiologic connection between tourette syndrome and the gyrus rectus and its interconnecting pathways is discussed.
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ranking = 3.5151109575675
keywords = tic
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5/254. Tourette's syndrome mimicking asthma.

    Tourette's syndrome is a neurological disorder consisting of chronic motor tics and involuntary vocalizations. Some of these vocalizations include coughing, grunting, and wheezing. We report two adolescents with a history of chronic coughing who presented for further evaluation of previously diagnosed asthma. A careful history suggested that Tourette's syndrome might be responsible for the patients' symptoms. neurology evaluation confirmed the correct diagnosis of Tourette's syndrome for both patients. Treatment specific for this disease led to ablation of all symptoms. A history of repetitive coughing in adolescents may be the presenting symptom of Tourette's syndrome, thereby mimicking cough-equivalent asthma.
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ranking = 0.50333605447689
keywords = tic, vocal, motor
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6/254. Anticipatory grip adjustments are observed in both goal-directed movements and movement tics in an individual with Tourette's syndrome.

    We examined grip force adjustments during movements of a hand-held object in a young man (BF) with Tourette's syndrome. We directly compared BF's voluntary up and down movements with tics in the same directions. Movement tics were elicited by cueing BF to move either up or down on a GO signal which appeared after a variable delay. During the delay period, we observed frequent tics which were almost always in the cued movement direction. BF's voluntary movements were well coordinated and featured precise and appropriate anticipatory grip force adjustments such that grip force was modulated in phase with movement-induced fluctuations in load. Precise anticipatory grip force adjustments were also observed in all of BF's movement tics. These results support the hypothesis that tics in Tourette's syndrome are purposeful voluntary movements that are well organized and coordinated.
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ranking = 7.5323806233588
keywords = tic
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7/254. Do the same genes predispose to Gilles de la tourette syndrome and dystonia? Report of a new family and review of the literature.

    Gilles de la tourette syndrome (TS) and idiopathic focal torsion dystonia are both movement disorders in which the pathologic process is thought to arise within the basal ganglia. However, despite their possible functional links, they are clinically distinct and are generally considered to have different underlying etiologies. There are several reports in the literature that suggest a relationship between eye winking tics, excessive blinking, and blepharospasm and a report of the coexistence of tics and dystonia. We describe a three-generation family in which TS and dystonias cosegregate. In total, eight patients were affected, five with dystonia and three with TS/facial tics. One of the patients with historic evidence of dystonia subsequently died of motor neuron disease. The identification of this family further strengthens the evidence in favor of an etiologic relationship between some cases of Gilles de la tourette syndrome and focal dystonia.
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ranking = 1.5064864490889
keywords = tic, motor
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8/254. Late onset startle induced tics.

    Three cases of late onset Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome are presented. The motor tics were mainly induced by an unexpected startling stimulus, but the startle reflex was not exaggerated. The tics developed after physical trauma or a period of undue emotional stress. reflex tics may occur in Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome, but have not been described in late onset Tourette's syndrome. Such tics must be distinguished from psychogenic myoclonus and the culture bound startle syndromes.
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ranking = 4.0172799902085
keywords = tic, motor
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9/254. A study of endogenous dopamine metabolism in Gilles de la Tourette's disease.

    This longitudinal, blind study of Gilles de la Tourette's disease in a 44 year old male patient who was nonresponsive to haloperidol therapy indicates that dopamine excretion is related to clinical response. An increased urinary excretion of dopamine and some of its metabolites was associated with the failure of haloperidol therapy. imipramine, administered to treat the patients' depressive mood that emerged in the course of treatment, decreased the urinary excretion of dopamine and moderately alleviated the symptoms of Tourette's syndrome. The results suggest that monitering urinary dopamine and 3-methoxytyramine excretion in Tourette's disease may predict the clinical response to pharmacotherapy, and that a dopaminergic mechanism may be associated with this type of motor hyperkinesia.
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ranking = 1.0324417097371E-5
keywords = motor
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10/254. Comorbid Down's syndrome, tourette syndrome and intellectual disability: registry prevalence and developmental course.

    The co-occurrence of tourette syndrome (TS) and Down's syndrome (DS) has been previously reported in the literature. In the present study, a retrospective record review was conducted using the north dakota TS registry in order to ascertain the number of cases of TS and DS, and to develop case descriptions. We identified five cases from north dakota. Two of these patients were simply comorbid for TS and DS. One was additionally comorbid for bipolar disorder, another for childhood disintegrative disorder and a third had a D/G group translocation. The association between DS and TS occured in 2% of TS patients. Contrary to the situation in patients with pervasive developmental disorders, the presence of TS in DS may be a negative prognostic indicator.
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ranking = 0.50215870822392
keywords = tic
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