Cases reported "Tracheal Diseases"

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1/14. Massive tracheal necrosis due to compression by an innominate artery aneurysm associated with a grade IV Chagasic megaesophagus and chronic duodenal ulcer.

    A 49-year-old man suffered necrosis of the cephalad tracheal segment due to compression by an innominate artery aneurysm. A peritracheal abscess, a grade IV chagasic megaesophagus, and a duodenal ulcer were also present. The patient underwent a three-stage surgical treatment, and 7 years later he is doing well, and breathing and eating normally.
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ranking = 1
keywords = esophagus
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2/14. Spontaneous closure of a large tracheal fistula due to descending necrotizing mediastinitis.

    We present a case of a 77-year-old man who had a large tracheal fistula due to descending necrotizing mediastinitis. He underwent long-term care with a respirator after mediastinal drainage operations. The fistula was covered spontaneously with the anterior wall of the esophagus 1.5 months postoperatively.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = esophagus
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3/14. A new variant of esophageal atresia with distal tracheo-antral fistula associated with congenital intrathoracic stomach and situs inversus.

    esophageal atresia (EA) with distal tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) is the most common anatomic pattern within congenital anomalies of the esophagus. Also, more than 50% of the infants with esophageal atresia have other congenital malformations. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of EA with distal tracheo-antral fistula associated with congenital intrathoracic stomach and situs inversus (SI).
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = esophagus
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4/14. Upper aerodigestive tract complications in a neonate with linear iga bullous dermatosis.

    linear iga bullous dermatosis (LABD) is a rare immunobullous condition known to affect the skin and mucous membranes of the eye and oral cavity in adults and young children. We describe a newborn with skin involvement who had life-threatening respiratory compromise from disease affecting the larynx, subglottis, trachea, and esophagus. Management with both tracheostomy and gastrostomy tube placement was necessary. Treatment included systemic steroids, dapsone, and intravenous immunoglobulin. We compare our neonatal case to the only other report in the literature highlighting involvement of the mucous membranes of multiple levels of the aerodigestive tract leading to respiratory compromise.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = esophagus
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5/14. Successful management of concomitant aortoesophageal and aortotracheal fistulae secondary to a thoracic aortic aneurysm: case report and review of literature.

    Thoracic aortic aneurysm with fistulization into the trachea or the esophagus is usually a lethal complication. An unusual case of combined aortotracheal and aortoesophageal fistulae is presented here. The patient had a successful outcome after resection of the aneurysm with tracheal repair and esophageal resection. A review of literature on this subject is also included in this manuscript.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = esophagus
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6/14. Cervical bronchogenic cyst: asymptomatic neck mass in an adult male.

    Bronchogenic cysts are rare congenital malformations of ventral foregut development. They are usually located in the mediastinum and intrapulmonary regions. Localization in the cervical area is unusual and the majority of cases reported have been found in the pediatric population: the literature reports few cases in adults. We describe a 57-year-old male who presented an asymptomatic right lateral neck mass. Diagnostic studies included chest X-ray, pharyngo-esophagus double-contrast X-ray, computed tomography (CT), and bronchoscopy. The mass was excised through a transverse right cervical skin incision. The right lateral neck mass of the patient was identified as a bronchogenic cyst. The embryology, the presentation, the pathological and radiological evaluation, treatment of the cyst and a review of the English literature are reported in this paper. Cervical bronchogenic cysts are usually diagnosed in the pediatric population; these lesions are rare in adults. We suggest that the clinical observation of an asymptomatic lateral neck mass in an adult should include the possibility of a bronchogenic cyst in the differential diagnosis. Surgical excision is the elective treatment for this tumor, in order to prevent complications including infection, compression symptoms, malignant transformation, and the rare but fatal air embolism.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = esophagus
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7/14. The use of the stomach in repairing tracheal leaks after resection of the oesophagus for carcinoma.

    A 44-year old male with carcinoma of the upper third of the oesophagus and invasion of the trachea recently underwent surgical treatment at our institution. After oesophageal resection tracheal and main bronchial leaks were unsuccessfully closed with pleural patches. The stomach was subsequently used to seal the remaining leaks. The post-operative recovery was uneventful and the patient was discharged after a hospital stay of 41 days.
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ranking = 1
keywords = esophagus
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8/14. Tracheo-colonic fistula: an exceptional complication after total replacement of an esophagus injured by acid.

    A 49-year-old woman underwent emergency gastrectomy for suicidal caustic ingestion, followed later by transhiatal esophagectomy and left colonic interposition. A fistula developed postoperatively between the trachea and interposed segment of colon. This exceptional complication was successfully treated by resection of the fistula, closure of the colonic defect and tracheal myoplasty using the sterno-cleidomastoid muscle.
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ranking = 0.8
keywords = esophagus
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9/14. Aberrant right subclavian artery: varied presentations and management options.

    Although an aberrant right subclavian artery arising from the proximal portion of the descending thoracic aorta is the most common aortic arch anomaly, few patients have clinical symptoms directly attributable to it. When symptoms do occur they are usually causally related to aneurysmal or occlusive sequelae of atherosclerotic disease of the anomalous vessel. More unusual manifestations peculiar to the anomalous artery include aneurysmal degeneration of the origin of the vessel from the aortic arch, with its inherent risk of rupture, or symptoms of compression of the trachea or more commonly the esophagus by the anomalous vessel as it traverses the superior mediastinum. In patients with symptoms a variety of operative approaches and management strategies have been used. Our recent experience with treatment of two patients with clinical symptoms caused by an aberrant right subclavian artery illustrate the varied surgical options and prompted a review of the surgical management of this unusual anomaly.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = esophagus
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10/14. Coughing up a stone. What to do about broncholithiasis.

    Broncholithiasis, a disease that is probably much more common than has been reported, is most often associated with pulmonary infections, for example, tuberculosis and histoplasmosis. Stones originate from calcified peribronchial lymph nodes that erode into the tracheobronchial tree, but lithoptysis occurs infrequently. The most common symptoms are persistent cough and hemoptysis, sometimes followed by findings of obstructive pneumonia (fever, chills, and purulent sputum). Physical findings are nonspecific, and radiologic findings are varied. Complications include formation of a fistula between the respiratory tract and the esophagus or aorta and obstructive pulmonary symptoms. Treatment ranges from conservative management (simple observation) to thoracotomy for patients in whom complications from stone erosion develop. The prognosis of patients with broncholithiasis is generally excellent.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = esophagus
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