Cases reported "Tracheal Stenosis"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/8. Malignant laryngotracheal obstruction: a way to treat serial stenoses of the upper airways.

    BACKGROUND: Six patients known to have inoperable esophageal carcinoma presented with stridor due to both malignant tracheal stenosis (n = 6) and bilateral vocal cord paralysis. Two patients also had respiratory-digestive fistula. methods: Patency was restored by endotracheal stenting plus unilateral cordectomy. Four patients had immediate relief. Two patients required enlargement of the cord incision. One of them declined reoperation and underwent tracheotomy. RESULTS: Stent function was uneventful. There was no dislodgement or mucous impaction. fistula seal was complete. There was no aspiration through the new-shaped glottic orifice. Peak expiratory flow increased from 24.4% /- 9.7% predicted normal before to 40.5% /- 13.7% after the procedure, whereas the dyspnea score decreased from 74.2 /- 12.7 to 24.2 /- 14.0. CONCLUSIONS: Restoration of airway continuity in serial laryngotracheal stenoses using a combined approach is a feasible technique in end-stage cancer patients. It effectively relieves respiratory distress and ensures voice preservation. In addition, it may avoid the risks of tracheotomy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = voice
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/8. Concurrent glottic and tracheal stenoses: restoration of airway continuity in end-stage malignant disease.

    Six patients known to have inoperable esophageal carcinoma presented with stridor due to both malignant tracheal stenosis (with additional respiratory-digestive tract fistula in 2 patients) and bilateral vocal cord paralysis. Patency was restored by endotracheal stenting plus unilateral cordotomy. Four patients had immediate relief. Two patients required enlargement of the vocal cord incision. One of them declined reoperation and underwent tracheostomy. The stent function was uneventful, with no dislodgment or mucus impaction. The fistula seal was complete, with no aspiration through the newly shaped glottic orifice. The peak expiratory flow increased from 24.4% /- 9.7% of predicted normal before the procedure to 40.5% /- 13.7% after the procedure. Restoration of airway continuity in serial laryngotracheal stenoses by a combined approach is a feasible technique in end-stage cancer patients. It effectively relieves respiratory distress and ensures voice preservation. In addition, it may avoid the risks of tracheotomy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = voice
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/8. Combined 'trache-stent': a useful option in the treatment of a complex case of subglottic stenosis.

    The authors describe the adaptation of a Montgomery T-tube laryngo-tracheal stent to incorporate an uncuffed fenestrated Shiley tracheostomy tube in the management of a complex case of subglottic stenosis. The combined 'trache-stent' provided a secure, unobstructed airway and optimal phonation. The presence of a removable inner tube facilitated cleaning and reduced patient anxiety regarding the perceived risks of stent obstruction with dried secretions. The combined 'trache-stent' was upsized at four weeks with minimal evidence of local granulation formation. The device was removed entirely six weeks later after direct laryngoscopy reconfirmed the above findings. Almost two years later the patient retains a good voice and airway using a simple fenestrated tracheostomy tube and speaking valve. The subglottic area is stable and the patient has returned to full-time employment.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = voice
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/8. Laryngotracheal reconstruction of the congenital glotto-subglottic stenosis with autogenous thyroid cartilage interposition: a case report.

    Surgical correction of grade III glotto-subglottic stenosis in a two-month-old girl was illustrated in a staged manner. Firstly, a silicone keel was placed via anterior thyrotomy following a tracheotomy. Secondly, laryngotracheal reconstruction was performed by interposing an autogenous thyroid cartilage anteriorly between the edges of the longitudinally divided cricoid cartilage and the upper tracheal rings. A stent was maintained for two months. The glottis and subglottis appeared patent and healed following removal of the stent. A meaningful voice and rather comfortable respiration were observed during a 13-month follow-up. The use of thyroid cartilage autograft offers many advantages in laryngotracheal reconstruction with considerably less technical difficulty.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = voice
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/8. Vascularized hemitracheal autograft for laryngotracheal reconstruction: a new surgical technique based on the thyroid gland as a vascular carrier.

    BACKGROUND: The management of extensive laryngotracheal stenosis has been a challenge confronting head and neck surgeons for over a century. The key to the successful restoration of a stable airway is providing a cartilaginous infrastructure to provide support to withstand both the negative and positive lumenal pressures produced during normal respiration and deglutition. We introduce a novel technique for restoration of such defects. methods: The blood supply to the thyroid gland by way of the inferior thyroid artery and the superior thyroid artery and vein are mobilized for transfer. One half to two thirds of the circumference of the adjacent tracheal rings are mobilized on the basis of the requirements of the stenotic segment. This mucochondrial composite tracheal flap is advanced superiorly to the ipsilateral "laryngeal" region where insetting of the cartilage and the mucosa is performed. Primary reconstruction or, more likely, a staged repair of the secondary tracheal defect is performed. RESULTS: Three case reports are presented. The patients were successfully decannulated postoperatively, continue to have an adequate voice, and are tolerating a diet (3-27 months postreconstruction). CONCLUSION: A new surgical technique for reconstruction of benign laryngotracheal stenoses is introduced to restore phonatory capability and a stable airway. The composite thyroid-tracheal graft based on the inferior and superior thyroid arterial pedicles allows a single-staged, primary reconstruction of the hemilarynx with a well-vascularized composite thyrotracheal flap that allows resurfacing as well as replacement of the infrastructure of the glottis and subglottis. This technique would be an excellent method to restore the cricoid ring following partial resection for primary cartilaginous tumors.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = voice
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/8. The management of laryngotracheal stenosis in burned patients.

    Following burns of the upper respiratory tract, laryngotracheal stenosis is associated with considerable morbidity. This paper deals with the cumulative effect of various pathologic processes involved in burn trauma of the upper airway. Emphasis is placed on the extended use of endotracheal intubation and the avoidance of tracheostomy whenever possible. When laryngotracheal stenosis develops, it may be safely and successfully treated by prolonged stenting, as has been borne out by our experience with the T-shaped silicone tubes. Limited reconstructive procedures can be performed to facilitate proper placement of the stent. In our opinion, laryngotracheal resection and reconstruction are not the procedures of choice in burn cases. Our experience in following the preceding guidelines is described. Three illustrative cases serve to exemplify the difficulties and problems involved in the various stages of treatment and the results obtained. The patients are symptom-free 18 to 24 months following stenting, and all enjoy an adequate airway and good voice. There were no complications resulting from this treatment and we suggest that it is worthy of trial.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = voice
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/8. Reconstruction of the pediatric airway with an open stented tracheotomy tube.

    Reconstructive techniques for the stenotic pediatric airway have greatly enhanced the otolaryngologists ability to decannulate the tracheotomy-dependent child. stents have played an important role in this process by both maintaining the reconstructed lumen and acting as a scaffold. However, decannulation is often not achieved after the first surgical intervention with some patients requiring two, three or more procedures. In an effort to improve upon the design of today's stents, an open stented tracheotomy tube was evaluated at our institution. This stent is designed to provide advantages of immediate postoperative voice and nutrition, and ease of evaluation, as well as to provide for safe and adequate healing. Four patients underwent laryngotracheal reconstruction with this stent over a 10-month period. All patients could vocalize and eat immediately postoperatively but recalcitrant granulation tissue and restenosis has prevented decannulation in three of the cases. The experience with this stent exemplifies the persistent difficulties of stent use in pediatric airway reconstruction. It also points out that progress is still needed in current reconstructive techniques as well as in the development of new techniques.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = voice
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/8. Reconstruction of the anterior commissure with a free mucosal flap.

    INTRODUCTION: To prevent stenosis and adhesion of the anterior commissure in the laryngeal reconstruction, we devised a technique of relining using a free labial mucosal graft and human fibrin glue. MATERIALS AND methods: A single large piece of mucosal flap was prepared, folded at the anterior commissure, and sutured onto the raw wound of the larynx from both sides of the posterior glottis. Alternate suturing from both right and left sides was performed anteriorly, and the wound on the laryngeal lumen was fully covered by the mucosal graft. We applied this technique on a patient with laryngeal stenosis and two patients with laryngeal cancer. RESULTS: Without the use of a stent, we successfully reconstructed the anterior commissure and obtained a good result in voice quality in each case. CONCLUSION: Large mucosal defects including the anterior commissure should be relined to acquire good voice quality. Relining using a free mucosal flap was a useful method since there were no limitations to size and placement. The adhesive property of human fibrin glue was indispensable in this procedure.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = voice
(Clic here for more details about this article)


Leave a message about 'Tracheal Stenosis'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.