Cases reported "Tracheoesophageal Fistula"

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1/217. esophageal atresia and tracheoesophageal fistula.

    esophageal atresia, with or without tracheoesophageal fistula, is a fairly common congenital disorder that family physicians should consider in the differential diagnosis of a neonate who develops feeding difficulties and respiratory distress in the first few days of life. esophageal atresia is often associated with other congenital anomalies, most commonly cardiac abnormalities such as ventricular septal defect, patent ductus arteriosus or tetralogy of fallot. Prompt recognition, appropriate clinical management to prevent aspiration, and swift referral to an appropriate tertiary care center have resulted in a significant improvement in the rates of morbidity and mortality in these infants over the past 50 years.
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2/217. Esophageal lung with multiple congenital anomalies: conundrums in diagnosis and management.

    BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: Communicating bronchopulmonary foregut malformations (CBPFM) are a diverse group of potentially devastating congenital anomalies with anatomy that may be difficult to delineate. The authors present a case that illustrates conundrums in the diagnosis and management of these complex disorders. methods: A term baby had esophageal atresia (EA), tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF), and tetralogy of fallot. Initially, a gastrostomy was performed, and a balloon catheter was inserted through the endotracheal tube to occlude the fistula until the patient was hemodynamically stable. Subsequently, the fistula was ligated. Postoperatively, the left lung collapsed, and bronchoscopy showed an atretic left mainstem bronchus. Repeat thoracotomy showed that the fistula ligation was intact. air was introduced through the gastrostomy tube, and, surprisingly, the left lung inflated, indicating the left mainstem bronchus arose from the esophagus distal to the ligated TEF. RESULTS: Despite reopening this fistula, ventilation remained poor, and support was withdrawn. autopsy findings confirmed a unilobed left lung arising from the esophagus, EA, TEF, an atretic left mainstem bronchus, tetralogy of fallot, and digeorge syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first report of a combination of EA and distal TEF with a second CBPFM involving the esophagus and the entire left lung. Successful correction of these anomalies will require extensive delineation of the anatomy to plan an operative strategy.
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3/217. Congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation of the lung associated with esophageal atresia and tracheoesophageal fistula.

    Bronchopulmonary malformations associated with esophageal atresia (EA) and tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) are extremely rare. The authors describe a case of type II congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (CCAM) of the right lower lobe associated with EA and TEF (Vogt-Gross type C) in a full-term female infant. The CCAM presented as an incidental radiologic finding, and a contralateral tension pneumothorax developed shortly after surgical repair of the EA. Early recognition of this rare association is essential for correct operative management.
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4/217. Successful long-term endoscopic closure of a recurrent tracheoesophageal fistula with fibrin glue in a child.

    We present an unusual case of recurrent tracheoesophageal fistula after primary surgical repair of congenital esophageal atresia. Traditionally, this disorder has required open-surgical correction, but successful endoscopic closure of these fistulas has been reported. This case report describes our experience using fibrin glue, applied endoscopically in a 6-year-old child, with encouraging long-term results 4 years after treatment.
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5/217. Use of a Palmaz stent for tracheomalacia: case report of an infant with esophageal atresia.

    A male infant with congenital cardiac anomalies and esophageal atresia with tracheoesophageal fistula (EA-TEF) showed intractable respiratory symptoms after delayed primary repair of EA-TEF. Computed tomography demonstrated that the trachea was compressed by the enlarged aorta. Artificial ventilation was necessary even after aortopexy performed at 2 months of age. At 140 days of age, an expandable metallic stent (Palmaz stent) was inserted through a rigid bronchoscope into the trachea underfluoroscopic control. His respiratory status improved dramatically, and he was extubated in 18 hours. Although the follow-up period has been 9 months, the short-term result is satisfactory. The expandable metallic stent placement should be considered in patients with EA-TEF who show intractable respiratory symptoms caused by tracheomalacia.
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6/217. A successful one-stage reconstruction of the esophagus in a newborn with a long gap esophageal atresia and tracheo-esophageal fistula.

    A method of one-stage surgery of long gap esophageal atresia was applied in a newborn child. An anterior muco-muscular flap was moulded from the upper pouch and transposed to the lower pouch of the esophagus. The technique allowed the tension in the anastomosis between the two parts of the esophagus to be reduced. The child had no feeding abnormalities during the follow-up till the age of 5 years.
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7/217. An uncommon association of H-type tracheoesophageal fistula with infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis.

    Although infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis following esophageal atresia repair is known, infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis following H-type tracheoesophageal fistula has not been encountered previously. A case of H-type tracheoesophageal fistula and infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis is presented. The patient, operated on for H-type fistula, a rare congenital anomaly of the esophagus, on the tenth day of life was readmitted 19 days later because of continuous vomiting after every feeding. The clinical findings and physical and radiological examinations revealed infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis which required surgical treatment. It is suggested that the association of H-type tracheoesophageal fistula with infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis is coincidental, given the estimated incidence of one in every 84,375,000 males and 337,500,000 females.
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8/217. esophageal atresia with blocked distal tracheo-esophageal fistula.

    A new born male child diagnosed for pure esophageal atresia was subsequently found to have blocked tracheo-esophageal fistula. The case is reported in view of its rarity and difficulty in management.
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9/217. Tar syndrome with unilateral absent radius and associated esophageal atresia: a variant?

    We report a male child with thrombocytopenia and Absent Radii (TAR) syndrome but with single absent radius and associated tracheoesophageal fistula which has never been reported till date.
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10/217. VACTERL with hydrocephalus and isolated tracheo-oesophageal fistula in a first cousin.

    A male infant is described of VACTERL with hydrocephalus where a female first cousin of this child had isolated oesophageal atresia with tracheo-oesophageal fistula. Possibly modes of inheritance are discussed.
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