Cases reported "Tracheoesophageal Fistula"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/37. Tracheoplasty in a large tracheoesophageal fistula.

    Postintubation tracheoesophageal fistulas (TEFs) are severe lesions that can be associated with tracheal stenosis and therapeutic difficulties. A case is reported of a woman with TEF and postintubation tracheal stenosis with 6.5 cm of affected trachea, and total esophageal exclusion. A tracheoplasty method is described patching the loss of the tracheal membranous wall with the posterior esophageal wall. In a final step, a self-expanded tracheal stent and esophagocolic bypass were added.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = tracheal stenosis, stenosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/37. An unusual cause of tracheal stenosis.

    PURPOSE: To report a large chronic tracheal foreign body, causing tracheal stenosis in an 11-yr-old girl. CLINICAL FEATURES: The history was suggestive of obstructive airways disease with secondary bronchiectasis. Physical findings were crepitations and rhonchi all over the chest. blood gases were normal. Chest X-ray showed bronchiectasis and a ventilation perfusion scan identified a tracheo-esophageal fistula. During anesthesia to confirm this, intubation and ventilation were difficult because of tracheal stenosis. The hypoventilation resulted in severe hypercarbia and acidosis. A subsequent CT scan showed a stenosis of 2 mm diameter and 1 cm length in the middle third of trachea, bronchiectasis, and an air filled pocket between the trachea and esophagus. PFT showed a severe obstruction. Antitubercular treatment which was started on the presumptive diagnosis of tuberculous stenosis and tracheoesophageal fistula caused a delay with deterioration of patient from intermittent dyspnea to orthopnea with severe hypecarbia and acidosis. The anesthetic management of the tracheal reconstruction was difficult due to her moribund condition even after medical treatment, the short length of the trachea above the obstruction, its severity and lack of resources for alternative techniques. A large foreign body was found lying obliquely in the trachea dividing it into an anterior narrow airway mimicking a stenosed trachea, and a wider posterior blind passage. CONCLUSION: The anesthetic consequences were peculiar to the unexpected etiology of the stenosis and poor general condition of the patient. Minor details like the tracheal tube bevel and ventilatory pattern became vitally important.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3.00659830883
keywords = tracheal stenosis, stenosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/37. An uncommon association of H-type tracheoesophageal fistula with infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis.

    Although infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis following esophageal atresia repair is known, infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis following H-type tracheoesophageal fistula has not been encountered previously. A case of H-type tracheoesophageal fistula and infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis is presented. The patient, operated on for H-type fistula, a rare congenital anomaly of the esophagus, on the tenth day of life was readmitted 19 days later because of continuous vomiting after every feeding. The clinical findings and physical and radiological examinations revealed infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis which required surgical treatment. It is suggested that the association of H-type tracheoesophageal fistula with infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis is coincidental, given the estimated incidence of one in every 84,375,000 males and 337,500,000 females.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.019794926490034
keywords = stenosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/37. Acquired tracheoesophageal fistula in critically ill patients.

    Acquired benign tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) is an infrequent complication of prolonged intubation and tracheostomy. Not infrequently, it is associated with severe circumferential malacia of the trachea and a need for concomitant correction of both. Controversy exists as to whether this should be performed in a single-stage or a 2-stage procedure. Four patients with acquired TEF underwent operation in a tertiary referral medical center between 1995 and 1997. The operations were performed through either an anterior (3) or a lateral (1) neck approach. Three patients underwent closure of the fistula with tracheal resection and anastomosis in a single stage and are doing well. One patient with complete subglottic stenosis underwent closure of the TEF and was planned for tracheal reconstruction in a second stage. This patient died in the early postoperative period. The complications included aspiration of blood leading to pneumonia (2), spontaneously resolving pneumomediastinum (1), subcutaneous emphysema (2), and cardiac arrhythmia ( 1). Residual fistula, noted in 1 patient, was treated conservatively and resolved spontaneously within several weeks. We conclude that acquired TEF is amenable to repair through a cervical approach. A single-stage correction of the TEF with reconstruction of the trachea is suitable and successful in most patients. Several stages seem justified when concurrent laryngotracheal reconstruction is needed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.0021994362766704
keywords = stenosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/37. Impacted denture causing tracheo-esophageal fistula.

    We report a 35-year-old man with an impacted denture resulting in tracheo-esophageal fistula. In view of significant local fibrosis and esophageal stenosis distal to the fistula, he was managed by subtotal esophagectomy and cervical esophagogastric anastomosis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.0021994362766704
keywords = stenosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/37. VATER/VACTERL association: clinical variability and expanding phenotype including laryngeal stenosis.

    Vertebral abnormalities and anorectal and tracheoesophageal defects are the main manifestations in the VATER/VACTERL association. Radial defects vary from radial aplasia to thumb duplication. heart and renal defects are reported with lower frequency. Additional malformations, such as the laryngeal stenosis described in the present patient, may expand the phenotype of the association. The wide spectrum of congenital abnormalities confirms the high clinical variability of VATER/VACTERL association which seems to be due to a disruption of blastogenesis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.010997181383352
keywords = stenosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/37. tracheoesophageal fistula secondary to chemotherapy for malignant B-cell lymphoma of the thyroid: successful surgical treatment with jejunal interposition and mesenteric patch.

    We report a case of tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) secondary to chemotherapy for primary thyroid lymphoma. A 65-year-old man with a short history of a rapidly enlarging neck mass was diagnosed as having thyroid lymphoma of diffuse, large B-cell type. The TEF occurred during the first course of chemotherapy including cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisolone. After placing a feeding gastrostomy without oral intake, eight cycles of chemotherapy were completed and complete remission was achieved. Although the cervical mass disappeared, TEF and esophageal stenosis persisted. Total thyroidectomy and resection of the stenotic cervical esophagus were carried out followed by interposition of the revascularized jejunum and its mesenteric patch to cover the TEF. This seems to be the first report of a TEF caused by chemotherapy for primary thyroid B-cell lymphoma. A variety of treatments for TEF including simple closure, tracheal resection, colonic bypass and muscle flap have been reported with low success rates. Our procedure using a jejunal mesenteric patch seems to be unique and may be a new treatment strategy for TEF.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.0021994362766704
keywords = stenosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/37. H-type tracheo-oesophageal fistula with congenital oesophageal stenosis.

    H-type tracheo-oesophageal fistula (H-TOF) and congenital oesophageal stenosis (COS) are both rare anomalies. Only six cases of H-TOF in association with COS have been described in the literature. Characteristically, diagnosis is delayed, often well beyond the neonatal period. We report a patient who was accurately diagnosed on day 12 of life, and outline several of the key clinical dilemmas encountered in managing a neonate with this combination of rare congenital anomalies.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.010997181383352
keywords = stenosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/37. somatostatin for intractable postoperative chylothorax in a premature infant.

    A premature infant of 31 weeks' gestation underwent repair of an oesophageal atresia, distal tracheo-oesophageal fistula and anal stenosis. A lymphatic leak was noted at the time of surgery. Chylous drainage persisted and an intravenous infusion of somatostatin was begun. The volume of chyle drained fell dramatically within the first 24 h and was negligible by the 5th day of treatment. No reaccumulation of the chylothorax was seen after the cessation of somatostatin. To our knowledge this is the youngest reported child in whom somatostatin has been used successfully in treating a postoperative chylothorax.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.0021994362766704
keywords = stenosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/37. Renovascular hypertension complicated with VATER association.

    We report herein a case of a girl with renovascular hypertension associated with VATER association. Her plasma renin activity and aldosterone were high. The ultrasonic echogram and renogram revealed a right hypoplastic kidney without function and a normal-sized left kidney with normal function. Renal angiography revealed a small diameter right main renal artery and a normal left main renal artery with segmental stenosis of left branching renal arteries in the middle segment. Selective renal vein sampling indicated that renin secretion was primarily from the left kidney. This is the first report of renovascular hypertension complicated with VATER association.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.0021994362766704
keywords = stenosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Tracheoesophageal Fistula'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.