Cases reported "Tuberculosis, Cutaneous"

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1/10. mycobacterium avium infection of the skin associated with lichen scrofulosorum: report of three cases.

    We report three Japanese children with mycobacterium avium infection of the skin who also developed lichen scrofulosorum, a previously undescribed association. They were healthy except for the presence of several noduloulcerative lesions associated with multiple asymptomatic papules on the trunk and extremities. histology of the ulcerative lesions showed features of mixed-cell granuloma, whereas the papular lesions showed features consistent with lichen scrofulosorum. M. avium was identified by polymerase chain reaction-aided dna-dna hybridization analysis in specimens obtained from the noduloulcerative lesions. Both the noduloulcerative and the papular lesions responded well to combination chemotherapy consisting of antituberculous agents and antibiotics.
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ranking = 1
keywords = avium
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2/10. Cutaneous malakoplakia: a report of two cases with the use of anti-BCG for the detection for micro-organisms.

    Malakoplakia is an uncommon granulomatous infectious disease that is found primarily in the genito-urinary tract, but may rarely involve the skin. Histologic findings are marked by the presence of foamy macrophages containing basophilic concentric spherules, the Michaelis-Gutman bodies. Micro-organisms are not readily identifiable. Immunostaining with polyclonal anti-mycobacterium bovis (BCG) has been described as a method of identifying bacterial and fungal organisms in situations where organisms may be sparse. We report 2 cases of cutaneous malakoplakia with demonstration of organisms by immunostaining with anti-BCG antibodies.
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ranking = 5.0760876286998
keywords = mycobacterium
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3/10. A rare combination of sites of involvement by Mycobacterium intracellulare in a hemodialysis patient: multifocal synovitis, spondylitis, and multiple skin lesions.

    PURPOSE: Atypical mycobacterial infection is a rare but serious hazard in immunocompromised patients including those undergoing maintenance hemodialysis and immunosuppressive therapy. Recognition of unusual involvement patterns is important. methods: We describe an extremely rare combination of complications caused by such an organism in a patient with end-stage renal disease: spinal osteolysis and multiple skin lesions associated with synovitis. RESULTS: The patient had received a renal allograft 18 years previously but developed infection with mycobacterium avium-M. intracellulare complex including dermatologic manifestations, spondylitis, and synovitis involving the wrist and lateral malleolus after initiation of hemodialysis when the transplanted kidney failed. An empirical antibiotic regimen failed to alleviate skin lesions or fevers, or to lower an elevated c-reactive protein concentration, until the patient's dose of methylprednisolone was increased to treat mild adrenal insufficiency. The increase resulted in rapid resolution of skin lesions. A compression fracture 6 months later was attributed to spondylitis caused by the same organism. CONCLUSIONS: We suspect that spondylitis represented the primary focus of M. intracellulare infection.
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ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = avium
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4/10. mycobacterium avium infection of the skin resembling lepromatous leprosy.

    A patient on systemic steroid therapy developed a cutaneous papule while histologically resembled lepromatous leprosy. Cultures of this lesion grew mycobacterium avium. Since there was no evidence of disseminated infection the lesion was excised and the patient continues to do well.
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ranking = 0.83333333333333
keywords = avium
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5/10. Disseminated atypical mycobacterial infection in hairy cell leukemia.

    The clinical features are described of disseminated atypical mycobacterial infection of the subcutaneous tissues occurring in a patient 3 yr after the diagnosis of hairy cell leukemia. skin biopsy identified the causative organism as an atypical mycobacterium of the M. avium-intracellulare-scrofulaceum (MAIS) complex. in vitro studies showed that the patient had impaired mononuclear cell phagocytosis. These findings, lend support to the hypothesis of a specific defect of immunity in hairy cell leukemia.
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ranking = 5.2427542953665
keywords = mycobacterium, avium
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6/10. Cutaneous spindle-cell pseudotumors due to Mycobacterium gordonae and Leishmania infantum. An immunophenotypic study.

    We report two patients with AIDS who had cutaneous spindle-cell pseudotumors caused by leishmania infantum in one instance and by an atypical mycobacterium in the other. The lesions mimicked neoplasms with predominantly spindled macrophages, similar to those seen in the histoid variant of leprosy. This histoid reaction is known to be related to mycobacteria. To our knowledge, this is the first case of histoid reaction due to leishmania. In both cases, the histiocytic cells were positive for vimentin and desmin but negative for alpha-smooth muscle. In addition, the immunostaining by lysosyme and alpha 1 antitrypsin was positive in both and in one the S-100 protein was positive. This reaction suggests dual myofibroblast and histiocytic differentiation.
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ranking = 5.0760876286998
keywords = mycobacterium
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7/10. skin infection caused by mycobacterium avium.

    A patient with skin infection due to mycobacterium avium is reported. A 9-year-old female had 10 subcutaneous nodules and two ulcers on the abdomen and legs. She had no medical history of systemic disease, skin disease or immunosuppressive therapy. Cultures of a biopsy specimen and of aspirated seropurulent fluid in nodules showed acid-fast bacteria, identified as M. avium by the dna-dna hybridization method. We treated her with a combination of surgery and the antibiotics, cycloserine, isoniazid and clarithromycin.
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ranking = 1
keywords = avium
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8/10. Concurrent cytomegalovirus, M. tuberculosis and M. avium-intracellulare cutaneous infection in an hiv patient.

    We report a 25-year-old hiv-positive man with a past medical history of disseminated cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, who developed cutaneous lesions during a disseminated mycobacterium infection. The histological changes of CMV and acid-fast bacilli were seen on histopathology of the lesions. Cultures were positive for M. tuberculosis and M. avium-intracellulare (MAI). CMV is frequently isolated from hiv patients, but skin involvement is rare. The association of CMV and mycobacteria can occur in cutaneous lesions of AIDS patients, but concurrent cutaneous involvement of CMV, M. tuberculosis, and MAI is unusual. These findings emphasize the polymorphous presentation of infectious disorders in AIDS patients and the need for multiple biopsies and for special stains in such patients.
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ranking = 5.9094209620331
keywords = mycobacterium, avium
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9/10. Cutaneous tuberculosis: a rare presentation in an immigrant.

    The increased incidence of tubercular diseases in industrialized countries appears to be due to several factors, including development of resistance to the most commonly used specific chemotherapeutic substances, unsuitable control programmes, hiv infection, the increased influx of immigrants, and homelessness. Different forms of cutaneous tuberculosis are caused by different species of mycobacteria (e.g., mycobacterium tuberculosis, M. bovis, M. avium). Determining the species of mycobacteria is relevant when disease is suspected to be linked to the type of employment of the patient, mainly because the clinical features do not always indicate which species is the cause of the infection. mycobacterium tuberculosis (MT) usually infects through the lung, but in rare cases can penetrate the skin or mucous membranes. skin transmission can be exogenous by inoculation, or endogenous by diffusion (lymphatic or hematic) or by contiguity. The immunologic status of the patient is a crucial factor which influences the clinical variants and the course of disease itself. Here we report a case of an illegal immigrant who presented with a bilateral, symmetrical ulcer on the neck.
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ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = avium
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10/10. A case of pustular ulcerative dermatosis of the scalp associated with ulcerative skin lesions on the scrotum.

    A 79-year-old man developed pustules, erosions, and ulcer with severe pain on the parietal regions of the scalp and the scrotum. In another hospital, mycobacterium was detected from the pustules of the scalp at Gaffky scale 1, and this patient was referred to our clinic. In our hospital, repeated cultures of the pus from the skin lesions of the scalp were negative for mycobacterium. biopsy specimens obtained from the skin lesions on the scalp disclosed ulcerative granulation with infiltration of inflammatory cells. Antibiotics and antituberculotic agents were ineffective. In contrast, the ulcerative skin lesions on the scalp and scrotum responded well to topical and systemic glucocorticosteroids. Although this patient developed pustular ulcerative skin lesions not only on the scalp but also on the scrotum, we considered this case to be pustular ulcerative dermatosis of the scalp developing ulcerative skin lesions on the scrotum.
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ranking = 10.1521752574
keywords = mycobacterium
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