Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/6. Colonic tuberculosis.

    Tubercle bacillus was discovered in 1882 by Robert Koch. With the introduction of chemotherapy for tuberculosis in the 1940s the incidence of this entity decreased. The incidence of the tuberculosis of the colon began to increase at the 1980s with the rise in numbers of patients considered as high risk for this entity, such as hiv-infected individuals, patients with chronic renal disease, and immunosuppressed patients with prolonged steroid therapy. We report on two patients with history of chronic abdominal pain and weight loss with a palpable mass in the right lower quadrant. In one patient chest radiography revealed a miliary reticulonodular pattern. In both, abdominal CT scan showed retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy and colonic wall thickness. Colonoscopic examination showed ulcerative lesions and ileocecal valve disruption. Microscopic examination of intestinal content showed evidenced M. tuberculosis. Tuberculosis of the colon should be suspected in patients suffering from chronic abdominal pain and weight loss.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = bacillus
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/6. Hypertrophic colonic tuberculosis.

    A patient who has suffered from hypertrophic colonic tuberculosis caused by the human strain of tubercule bacillus is presented. Despite being an uncommon presentation of tuberculosis, it is of more than academic interest to surgeons practising in tropical countries.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = bacillus
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/6. A solitary tuberculous ulcer in the oesophagus.

    A 48-year-old woman born in pakistan was evaluated for dysphagia. endoscopy showed a solitary ulcerative oesophageal lesion. Cultures were positive for mycobacterium tuberculosis. Additional imaging showed no other manifestations of tuberculosis. Oesophageal tuberculosis is a rare entity, especially as a primary manifestation defined as involvement of the oesophagus without signs of disseminated disease. Therefore, this case was classified as primary oesophageal tuberculosis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.49820384793542
keywords = mycobacterium
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/6. Gastrointestinal tuberculosis: resurgence of an old pathogen.

    Thirteen patients with gastrointestinal tuberculosis (GITB) were treated at our hospitals from 1977-1987. Ten of these patients were seen during the last four years. Three patients required operative intervention for management of complications of their disease. This review discusses the presentation, diagnosis, and operative management of GITB. The authors feel that the increasing prevalence of GITB noted in their institution is primarily the result of the growing prevalence of mycobacterium tuberculosis pneumonia across the nation. With the recent influx of patients from areas of endemic tuberculosis and the increasing number of immunosuppressed patients, a surge in the number of patients presenting with GITB is likely to occur in the united states. Surgeons must be conversant with the diverse clinical features and operative management of this disease.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.49820384793542
keywords = mycobacterium
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/6. Concomitant ceco-appendicular and urinary tuberculosis. Description of two rare cases: physiopathological and diagnostic remarks.

    Two cases of specific tubercular processes in the ceco-appendicular zone and the urinary system in men aged 25 and 30 years are described. Both patients reported abdominal pain and persistent fever that did not respond to treatment. Surgery revealed ulcerated appendix, intraperitoneal serous exudate, ascitic liquid, peritoneal ulcerocaseous nodules, and fibrous adhesions. Histological sections revealed a tubercular puchet in the ceco-appendicular zone. Subsequent x-ray test in response to reports of frequent painful urination showed specific lesions in the papillae and renal ureteral ampullae, and urine cultures were positive for Koch's bacillus. Treatment with streptomycin, followed by isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol, and morinamid for 2 years, was effective.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = bacillus
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/6. Tuberculous colitis mimicking Crohn's disease.

    Intestinal tuberculosis is a rare disease in western countries and may mimic a variety of gastrointestinal disorders. Here, we report the case of a 63-yr-old patient who presented with profuse bleeding from a deep rectal ulcer. Similar lesions were found in different parts of the colon. Multilocular colorectal carcinoma was suspected based on the macroscopic appearance. histology, however, suggested Crohn's disease. Intestinal tuberculosis was initially ruled out by negative staining for acid-fast bacilli, mycobacterial culture, and polymerase chain reaction analysis. A treatment for Crohn's disease was started. Endoscopic reexamination revealed progressive disease with extensive ulcerations of the terminal ileum. Histopathological examination then revealed acid-fast bacilli in the colonic mucosa typical for mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. This case emphasizes the need to include intestinal tuberculosis in the initial differential diagnosis of ulcerative colorectal lesions also in the western population.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.49820384793542
keywords = mycobacterium
(Clic here for more details about this article)


Leave a message about 'Tuberculosis, Gastrointestinal'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.