Cases reported "Tuberculosis, Lymph Node"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/205. Kikuchi-Fujimoto's syndrome masquerading as tuberculosis.

    We report a case of a 27-year-old Asian man presenting with the typical features of tuberculous cervical lymphadenitis who was commenced on anti-tuberculous therapy on the strength of the clinical presentation. Histological examination of an excised cervical lymph node however, revealed the diagnosis of Kikuchi's syndrome; a histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis which is usually self-limiting.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = tuberculosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/205. Primary tuberculosis of the penis.

    We present a case of primary tuberculosis of the inner lining of the prepuce in a 63-year-old man. The condition resembled carcinoma. The diagnosis was based on histopathology and on M. tuberculosis culture. Successful treatment was by a combined medical and surgical approach. The rarity of the case is emphasized.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.5
keywords = tuberculosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/205. Disseminated tuberculosis: still a diagnostic challenge.

    Disseminated tuberculosis is notoriously difficult to diagnose and, with the decrease in tuberculosis incidence in australia, familiarity with its manifestations has dwindled. We describe four bacteriologically proven cases which illustrate the range of presentations and diagnostic difficulties. Surprisingly, immunosuppressive therapy need not cause rapid deterioration. Disseminated tuberculosis should be considered in any patient with multisystem illness who is at risk of tuberculosis, particularly if born overseas. In the absence of confirmatory results, a prompt therapeutic trial may be life-saving.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = tuberculosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/205. Lepromatous lymphadenopathy and concomitant tuberculous axillary lymphadenitis with sinus. A case report.

    A 25-year-old male patient with florid lepromatous leprosy presented with right axillary lymphadenopathy and a discharging sinus. He also had scabies with chronic right otitis media. Histopathological examination of the lymph node revealed lepromatous lymphadenitis coexisting with tuberculosis. This unusual combination of two different clinical entities is recorded in this case report.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.25
keywords = tuberculosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/205. Reactivation of tuberculosis after conversion from azathioprine to mycophenolate mofetil 16 years after renal transplantation.

    The incidence of tuberculosis among transplant recipients is greater than in the general population. Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is a potent immunosuppressive agent that has become part of most standard immunosuppressive protocols after renal transplantation. We have recently shown that conversion from azathioprine (AZA) to MMF in patients with chronic allograft dysfunction may be beneficial. Here, we report a patient with a history of pulmonary tuberculosis during his childhood. This patient was converted from AZA to MMF therapy 16 years after allogenic renal transplantation because of chronic allograft dysfunction. Two months later, he developed axillary lymph node tuberculosis caused by mycobacterium tuberculosis. Because he denied contact with infectious persons, we diagnosed reactivation of old dormant tuberculosis. After surgical extirpation, quadruple antituberculous therapy was administered for 3 months (isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol, and pyrazinamide), followed by dual therapy for 3 months (isoniazid and rifampicin), and monotherapy for another 3 months (isoniazid). In the follow-up period, he remained asymptomatic with stable graft function. We conclude that MMF therapy in renal allograft recipients may cause reactivation of old dormant tuberculosis, even in the very late posttransplantation period. In these patients, close monitoring and isoniazid prophylaxis may be useful.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2.5
keywords = tuberculosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/205. Spontaneous oesophageal perforation due to mediastinal tuberculous lymphadenitis - atypical presentation of tuberculosis.

    Spontaneous non-traumatic oesophageal perforation secondary to bursting of a mediastinal tuberculous abscess into the oesophagus is rare. The diagnosis is delayed, as perforation remains localised due to mediastinal lymph nodes. Patient can be effectively managed by paraoesophageal drainage of the mediastinal abscess and oesophageal diversion.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = tuberculosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/205. Childhood Lichen scrofulosorum revisited.

    Lichen scrofulosorum (LS), an uncommon cutaneous tuberculous reaction, has been described in children and young adults. In the last three decades, there has been a dearth of literature on the entity in children, despite a global increase in tuberculosis. It is usually associated with localized cervical, hilar, or mediastinal lymphadenopathy or with osseous tuberculosis. The occurrence of LS in association with pulmonary tuberculosis is rare and its occurrence with generalized lymphadenopathy is unrecognized. We report LS in two children and highlight its occurrence with pulmonary tuberculosis and generalized lymphadenopathy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = tuberculosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/205. Supra-sternal notch tuberculous abscess: a report of three cases.

    Extra-pulmonary tuberculosis remains a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge; its clinical presentation can mimic a wide range of pathological conditions. Here we report on 3 female patients who presented with supra-sternal masses that were suspected clinically to be of thyroid origin. By use of fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC), they were proved to be tuberculous lesions involving the pre-tracheal lymph nodes. Serological examination for HIV-I/II was not reactive in the 3 patients. The patients responded well to a regimen of multi-drug therapy. It is concluded that extra-pulmonary tuberculosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of thyroid or para-thyroid swellings and that FNAC is a simple, quick and reliable procedure in the diagnosis of extra-pulmonary tuberculous lesions involving the neck.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = tuberculosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/205. splenic vein occlusion secondary to tuberculous lymphadenitis at the splenic hilum: report of a case.

    We report a patient with splenic vein occlusion (SVO) secondary to tuberculosis. A 17-year-old male patient with mild epigastric pain and splenomegaly was found to have gastric varices by gastroscopy, and SVO by selective angiography. At operation, the splenic vein was occluded by hard fibrous tissue at the splenic hilum, and thus a splenectomy was performed. A microscopic examination of the tissue revealed caseous necrosis surrounded by epithelioid cells and Langhans-type giant cells. Although there were no other findings suggesting intestinal tuberculosis, it seemed that tuberculous lymphadenitis of the splenic hilum most likely caused the occlusion of the splenic vein. Because specific tests for tuberculosis were negative in both immunohistochemical staining for bacille Calmette-Guerin and polymerase chain reaction of dna for mycobacterium tuberculosis, the time of infection was assumed to have occurred a long time before. SVO can sometimes be seen in pancreatic diseases, but this patient with tuberculosis appears to be the first such reported case in the English literature.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.25
keywords = tuberculosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/205. superior vena cava syndrome during the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis in an hiv-1 infected patient.

    Tuberculosis is nowadays an uncommon cause of superior vena cava syndrome (SVCS). We report the case of an HIV-infected patient who presented with respiratory symptoms accompanied by cervical and mediastinal lymphadenopathy. sputum examination showed acid-fast bacilli, and treatment was instituted with isoniazid, rifampicin, pyrazinamide and ethambutol. A few days later SVCS developed, presumably as a consequence of inflammatory lymphadenitis. With corticosteroids, all symptoms disappeared. To our knowledge, no cases of SVCS provoked by this kind of paradoxical reaction have been described previously.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = tuberculosis
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Tuberculosis, Lymph Node'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.