Cases reported "Tuberculosis, Pulmonary"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/51. Developing bronchial fistulas as a late complication of extraperiosteal plombage.

    A 65-year-old male, who underwent extraperiosteal plombage for pulmonary tuberculosis 46 years ago, was referred to our hospital due to relapsing hemosputa and pneumonia. A chest computed tomography scan revealed a bronchial fistula and a fluid collection in one Lucite ball. On May 20, 1996, a right-anterior thoracotomy was performed in a supine position. Five Lucite balls were removed, and the empyema space was tightly filled with an omental pedicle flap. Although the bronchial fistulas were not sutured directly, the air leakage from the drainage tube ceased 12 days later. Two years postoperatively the patient has remained well. Our simple approach of combining an anterior thoracotomy and replacement of an empyema space with an omental pedicle flap in the same posture, without closing bronchial fistulas, would be an easy procedure, and therefore exploitable in patients who have a similar problem.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/51. 'Pseudo' treatment failure of pulmonary tuberculosis in association with a tuberculoma.

    Failure of tuberculosis patients to respond to treatment is usually explained by one or more of five mechanisms: improper drug prescription; patient nonadherence to prescribed therapy; primary or acquired drug resistance; drug malabsorption; and rarely, exogenous reinfection with a drug-resistant isolate. Response to treatment is best measured bacteriologically; two different smear and one culture criteria for failure are widely used. patients meeting either smear, but not culture, criteria for treatment failure may be said to have 'pseudo' treatment failure. Whether a patient can meet both smear criteria for failure, and not have a mechanism for treatment failure nor meet culture criteria, is unknown. A case of 'pseudo' treatment failure is reported in which both smear criteria for failure were met, but no mechanism for failure was proven to be operative.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/51. Anaesthetic management for a left pneumonectomy in a child with bronchopleural fistula.

    The anaesthetic management of a left pneumonectomy in a 18-month-old girl with a bronchopleural fistula is described. An ordinary tracheal tube was slit at the bevel to ensure upper lobe ventilation on right endobronchial intubation. A combination of a bronchial blocker, endobronchial intubation with a slit tube, and nerve blocks for these manoeuvres was used. pain relief by a thoracic epidural block ensured good physiotherapy and a comfortable postoperative period.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/51. Reconstruction of upper chest wall defects with a function-preserving pectoralis major muscle flap: case report.

    The pectoralis major muscle or myocutaneous flap has a nearly 100% success rate in reconstructing chest wall defects. Major adverse sequelae resulting from the use of the pectoralis major muscle or myocutaneous flap are rarely reported in the literature. However, the loss of pectoralis major muscle function caused by the detachment of the muscle from its insertion on the humeral bone is of more and more concern. This is a significant loss for manual laborers when the patient tries to handle tools or control heavy machinery. A case of upper sternal osteomyelitis is reported. After wide debridement with partial excision of the sternum, the second and third ribs, the right pleura, and the lung were exposed. A right unilateral pectoralis major muscle flap was transposed to restore the defect. In addition, to preserve the lateral portion of the muscle and its insertion on the humerus, the origin of the lower sternocostal part of the pectoralis major muscle was transposed to the medial clavicle and residual upper sternum. In this way, not only was the chest wall defect reconstructed but the function of the residual pectoralis major muscle was also preserved. Postoperative follow-up at one year demonstrated no arm weakness, no limitation in shoulder range of motion, and no evidence of atrophy of the transposed pectoralis major muscle. Our experience with this function-preserving pectoralis major muscle flap was encouraging and we suggest it be employed in the reconstruction of the upper anterior chest wall.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/51. Bronchostenosis due to childhood tuberculosis and manifested as an asymptomatic mass.

    We report a case of bronchostenosis manifested as an asymptomatic mass on preoperative chest roentgenogram. Bronchoscopic biopsy inadvertently led to drainage of the obstructed bronchus. The various pathogenic origins of bronchostenosis are discussed, with the most likely cause in this case being previous tuberculosis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/51. mitral valve replacement in a patient with a collapsed lung.

    A 67-year-old man, with a history of pulmonary tuberculosis since 18 years old, presented shortness of breath because of severe mitral regurgitation. magnetic resonance imaging showed that the heart was displaced into the left thoracic cavity and rotated clockwise around its long axis. The forced expiratory volume per second was 1.06 l (46.7% of the predicted value) and the vital capacity was 2.48 l (72.1% of predicted value). Surgery was performed through a median sternotomy. An internal mammary artery harvest retractor was used to obtain operative exposure. Extensive pericardial suspension was used to push the over-inflated right lung across the midline. extracorporeal circulation was established. The mitral valve was replaced with a mechanical prosthesis. The patient was weaned easily from extracorporeal circulation and was extubated on the day of surgery. If preoperative respiratory function is adequate, cardiac surgery can be performed safely in a patient with only one functional lung.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/51. Surgical management of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.

    We report surgical resections in 3 patients with active multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. All cases involved strains of mycobacterium tuberculosis resistant to at least isoniazid and rifampin and patients who were poor candidates for medical therapy alone. We conducted pulmonary resections (partial resection in case 1, lobectomy in case 2, and segmentectomy in case 3). The optimum multiple-drug regimen, based on drug susceptibility studies, was used preoperatively and postoperatively. In all cases, sputum smears and cultures yielded negative results postoperatively, and continue to be negative for mycobacterium tuberculosis to date. It is recommended that, if localized disease is present and medical treatment is likely to fail, pulmonary resection be conducted for multidrug-resistant mycobacterium tuberculosis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/51. Massive intrathoracic haemorrhage after CT-guided lung biopsy.

    CT-guided lung biopsy is now widely performed for tumorous lesions in the lung, and both its usefulness in this context and the associated complications have been well described in the literature. Although severe complications are rare, we describe a case in which massive intrathoracic haemorrhage developed after lung biopsy and necessitated emergency operation for control. Intraoperative findings suggested that the source of the haemorrhage was a fibrous, cord-like substance present at the site of adhesion associated with old tuberculosis. We attributed this haemorrhage to a pneumothorax, which developed after lung biopsy and caused the new vessels penetrating the centre of the fibrous, cord-like substance to stretch and rupture. Numerous cases have been reported of spontaneous haemopneumothorax precipitated by spontaneous pneumothorax and resulting from the rupture of such vessels.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/51. Excision of a giant hydatid cyst of the lung under thoracic epidural anaesthesia.

    We present a patient with a large pulmonary hydatid cyst compressing underlying lung, with previous pulmonary tuberculosis, who presented in respiratory failure. After institution of thoracic epidural anaesthesia employing 0.25% bupivacaine, 1% lignocaine and fentanyl, the patient was placed in the sitting position and the hydatid cyst excised and drained after a limited rib resection. An air leak persisted until the 16th postoperative day. A marked improvement in symptoms as well as in spirometly and arterial blood gases occurred, and the patient was discharged on the 20th day. Thoracic epidural anaesthesia may be a safer method than general anaesthesia for removal of a hydatid cyst in a patient with severe respiratory compromise.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/51. Sternal tuberculosis after coronary artery bypass graft surgery.

    We report a case of sternal tuberculosis following sternotomy, which was performed during coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Although pre-operative evaluation revealed signs of asymptomatic tuberculosis of the lung, isoniazid chemoprophylaxis was not instituted, and the patient developed active tuberculosis in both the lung and sternum 5 y later.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Tuberculosis, Pulmonary'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.